• Learn About Pesticides in Foods
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • SNAP Display at Event
  • Grow a Lush Garden Organically
  • Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Learn to Manage Pests Naturally
  • SNAP Tour of Organic Vegetable Garden

Latest News...

Friday, October 6, 2017

A worldwide survey of neonicotinoids in honey

We found at least one of five tested compounds in 75% of all samples

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A worldwide survey of neonicotinoids in honey

E. A. D. Mitchell1,2,* et al  (Science  06 Oct 2017: Vol. 358, Issue 6359, pp. 109-111)

We assessed the global exposure of pollinators to neonicotinoids by analyzing 198 honey samples from across the world. We found at least one of five tested compounds (acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloprid, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) in 75% of all samples, 45% of samples contained two or more of these compounds, and 10% contained four or five. 

filed under neonicotinoids and  food

Saturday, September 30, 2017

Monsanto banned from European parliament

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Monsanto banned from European parliament (The Guardian, 28 Sept. 2017)
I wish we had rules like that in North America! We coud finally start cleaning up democracy, until compamies find a way around it.

'Monsanto lobbyists have been banned from entering the European parliament after the multinational refused to attend a parliamentary hearing into allegations of regulatory interference.'
It is the first time MEPs have used new rules to withdraw parliamentary access for firms that ignore a summons to attend parliamentary inquiries or hearings.'
 

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

U of S defends prof's Monsanto ties, but some faculty disagree

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U of S defends prof's Monsanto ties, but some faculty disagree

'We encourage our faculty to translate their knowledge,' says public policy school director Jeremy Rayner  (By Jason Warick, CBC News  May 10, 2017) 

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Altered Genes, Twisted Truth

How the Venture to Genetically Engineer Our Food Has Subverted Science, Corrupted Government, and Systematically Deceived the Public,

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Altered Genes, Twisted Truth

Steven Druker talked about his book Altered Genes, Twisted Truth: How the Venture to Genetically Engineer Our Food Has Subverted Science, Corrupted Government, and Systematically Deceived the Public, in which he discusses the science and regulations behind genetically engineered food. His organization, Alliance for Bio-Integrity, filed a lawsuit that uncovered concerns that some FDA scientists had about risks related to genetically engineered food.

interesting 1 1/2 hour video of the auhor's talk. worth litening to.

files under gmos/Safety/Health Effects

Saturday, September 23, 2017

Pesticides 101

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Pesticides 101 (PANNA)

Pesticides are used all around us, in homes and gardens, schools, parks and agricultural fields.

All too often, these chemicals are allowed onto the market before their impacts are fully understood — and harms to our health and the environment are discovered years later. The science is increasingly clear that even low levels of exposure can harm human health, and children are particularly vulnerable.

includes 

  1. What are pesticides?
  2. What is the “pesticide treadmill?”
  3. Which rules govern pesticides?  US and international
  4. Exposure & impacts

filed under pesticides-101-introduction-to-pesticides

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

No doubt that neonicotinoids are killing birds, bees, scientists say

Pesticides also pose deadly risk to frogs, birds, fish, earthworms, French scientist says

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No doubt that neonicotinoids are killing birds, bees, scientists say

Pesticides also pose deadly risk to frogs, birds, fish, earthworms, French scientist says

(By Mia Rabson, The Canadian Press Posted: Sep 19, 2017) 

Since 2013 the European Union hasn't allowed the use of the three most common neonics in any crops which attract bees and is looking at extending that to additional crops.

France is phasing in a complete ban on all agricultural uses of neonics, with the full ban set to take effect next year...Bonmatin said since Europe began barring the use of neonics, there has been success at limiting the exposure honey bees have to the toxic chemicals, without a significant reduction in crop yields.

more on neonicotinoids at pesticide factsheets

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Water is the Connection: Managing Pesticide Risk for Salmon Recovery A Guide for Willamette Valley Farmers

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Water is the Connection: Managing Pesticide Risk for Salmon Recovery
A Guide for Willamette Valley Farmers
  (NCAP, June 2017)

This publication is designed to help pesticide applicators, especially in agriculture, learn about salmon in the Willamette Basin and the pesticides that are harmful to salmon or their
food sources. Pesticide label language that indicates potential for aquatic contamination is explained. Voluntary Best Management Practices (BMPs) to minimize pesticide risk to aquatic habitats are included. Pesticide applicators can choose among these BMPs to reduce the risk of harming salmon.

SNAP Comment: Most of the pesticides discussed here are also used in Saskatchewan and the risk to aquatic environments and other fish species is likely similar. With only 1 provincial  and 2 federal pesticide inspectors in Saskatchewan, most misuse is never reported, and even less prosecuted. The importance of this report is in presenting sucessful alternatives to pesticides.

filed under wildlife/ aquatic organisms and alternatives/overview

Wednesday, September 6, 2017

Farmersí Greater Risk of Diabetes Linked to Pesticide Exposure

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Farmers’ Greater Risk of Diabetes Linked to Pesticide Exposure

(Beyond Pesticides, September, 2017) A recently released report, Gallup-Sharecare State of Well-Being: The Face of Diabetes in the United States, looks at high diabetes rates across various U.S. demographic groups, including those in farming. People working in the transportation sector registered the highest incidence of diagnosed diabetes at 10.6%. But those working as farmers and fishermen came in second, with 8.5% reporting a diagnosis of the disease.

filed under health/dibetes-obesity

Friday, September 1, 2017

Complex mixtures of dissolved pesticides show potential aquatic toxicity in a synoptic study of Midwestern U.S. streams

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Complex mixtures of dissolved pesticides show potential aquatic toxicity in a synoptic study of Midwestern U.S. streams (Science of The Total Environment,online 9 August 2017)

In weekly water samples, 94 pesticides and 89 degradates were detected, with a median of 25 compounds detected per sample and 54 detected per site. Relatively few pesticides in water—atrazine, acetochlor, metolachlor, (the insecticides) imidacloprid, fipronil, organophosphate insecticides, and the fungicide carbendazim—were predicted to be major contributors to potential toxicity. Agricultural streams had the highest potential for effects on plants, especially in May–June, corresponding to high spring-flush herbicide concentrations. Urban streams had higher detection frequencies and concentrations of insecticides and most fungicides than in agricultural streams, and higher potential for invertebrate toxicity, which peaked during July–August.

SNAP Comment: I wonder how many pesticides they actually tested for (i.e. were there any negativ findings?) I suspect that the reason only 7 pesticides were major contributors to potential toxicity is that they are the most heavily used. Hopefully this assertion is examined in the paper.I suspect that most of what is used would be found in an area's streams in Canada, should we check. However we re still in the dark as to pesticides used in each province.

filed under water

Thursday, August 31, 2017

Birth Abnormalities Linked to Pesticide Exposures

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Birth Abnormalities Linked to Pesticide Exposures

(Beyond Pesticides, August 31, 2017) Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara report in a new study that exposure to pesticides as a result of living near agricultural areas increases the risk of giving birth to a baby with abnormalities. These results are more significant for those exposed to very high levels of pesticides, underscoring the continued risks faced by farmworkers and farmworker families, especially mothers living near chemically-intensive treated fields.

The study, “Agricultural pesticide use and adverse birth outcomes in the San Joaquin Valley of California,” looked at individual birth and demographic characteristics for over 500,000 birth observations between 1997 and 2011 in the agriculturally dominated San Joaquin Valley, California. The researchers, who report their findings as, “the most comprehensive to date,

filed under Birth Defects