• LIving Near Fields Increases Pesticide Exposure
  • SNAP Display at Event
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • Learn About Pesticides in Foods
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Grow a Lush Garden Organically
  • Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Driving Near Recently Sprayed Fields Exposes People to Pesticides
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • SNAP Tour of Organic Vegetable Garden

Latest News...

Friday, November 17, 2017

Baking Soda Washes Pesticides from Apples

from the surface only, not what had penetrated the skin

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Baking Soda Washes Pesticides from Apples (By Janet Pelley, for C&EN, 15 NOv. 2017)

'The scientists compared the efficacy of the germicidal bleach to rinsing with tap water or a sodium bicarbonate solution, which is alkaline. “Most pesticides are not stable at an alkaline pH, which breaks down the compounds and helps to wash them away,” she explains.'  The researchers applied two common pesticides, the fungicide thiabendazole and the insecticide phosmet, at concentrations used by farmers. 

'Immersing the apples in a sodium bicarbonate solution for 15 minutes followed by a freshwater rinse removed all pesticide residues from the surface of the apples, whereas the tap water and bleach treatments removed some, but not all. Sodium bicarbonate degrades the pesticides, boosting the physical removal force of washing, He says.' However some residue had penetrated the peel and could not be removed.

filed under Pesticide Remediation/Removal



Monday, November 13, 2017

'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds

Th birds lost wight and their sense of direction with low dose exposure

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'On life support:' Research shows common pesticides starve, disorient birds

SNAP Comment: Another great study from Christy Morrissey at University of Saskatchewan.Low dose studies are typically not required for pesticide registration, and neither are behavioral studies. Looks like she is now on the radar of CropLife Canada. I wish her the best!

"Morrissey studied the effect of two widely used pesticide types — neonicotinoids and organophosphates. Both are used on more than 100 different crops, including wheat and canola, and are found in dozens of commercial products. Both are known to be lethal to birds in large doses, but Morrissey wanted to study the impact of smaller amounts. The results were dramatic.

After three days, the low-dose birds lost 17 per cent of their weight. The high-dose birds lost 25 per cent.

The birds exposed to organophosphates kept their weight, but they lost something else — their ability to find north. Both the high-dose and low-dose group lost all orientation and didn’t get it back after the tests ended.

The neonics also disoriented the sparrows, but the effect faded when the exposure stopped.

filed under wildlife/ birds

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Sulfoxaflor and flupyradifurone: Neonicotinoids or not ?

This factsheet has demonstrated how pesticide companies make use of pseudo-science to give their new pesticides a more positive image

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Sulfoxaflor and flupyradifurone:  Neonicotinoids or not ? (PAN Europe, Sept 2016)

The pesticide industry is trying to hide the reality behind two new chemicals that are similar to the notorious group of neonicotinoids linked to massive bee death all over the world.
Their properties clearly show that they should be classified as neonicotinoids.

General conclusion
This factsheet has demonstrated how pesticide companies make use of pseudo-science to give their new pesticides a more positive image. In the frame of the ever greater interest of the general public in the relation between pesticide use and health damage, including bee health, the fact that pesticide companies themselves decide what category a pesticide belongs to, for mere regulatory or marketing purposes should not be authorised.
Sulfoxaflor and flupyradifurone are neonicotinoid insecticides. They should be treated accordingly by regulator, taking into account their systemicity and the harm they could cause to non-target organisms such as bees.

filed under pesticide fact sheets

Saturday, October 28, 2017

Press Release: New Study: Glyphosate persists! And European top soils are contaminated with it.

The concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA found in the study have been shown to be toxic to soil organisms

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Press Release: New Study: Glyphosate persists! And European top soils are contaminated with it. (PAN Europe, October 13, 2017)

"45% of Europe’s top soil contains glyphosate residues, demonstrating the over-reliance of the EU agricultural model on this harmful herbicide chemical. In contrast to what its manufactures2 purport, glyphosate persists in soils affecting not only soil fertility and crop quality, but also human and environmental health." 

"The concentrations of glyphosate and AMPA found in the study have been shown to be toxic to soil organisms such as earthworms3, beneficial bacteria4 and fungi5 , as glyphosate weakens down plants’ natural defences making them susceptible to pathogens6." 

filed under pesticide fact sheets / glyphosate

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Long-term yield trends of insect-pollinated crops vary regionally and are linked to neonicotinoid use, landscape complexity, and availability of pollinators

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Long-term yield trends of insect-pollinated crops vary regionally and are linked to neonicotinoid use, landscape complexity, and availability of pollinators (Heikki M. T. Hokkanen et al,  Arthropod-Plant Interactions, June 2017, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 449–461, First Online: 21 April 2017) a Finnish study.

 'It appears that only the uptake of neonicotinoid insecticide seed dressing about 15 years ago can explain the crop yield declines in several provinces, and at the national level for turnip rapeseed, most likely via disruption of pollination services by wild pollinators.'

filed under Bee Die-Off and neonicotinoids

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Glyphosate on feed affects livestock: vet

A veterinarian in Shaunavon, Sask., believes feed with glyphosate residue adversely affects cattle health

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Glyphosate on feed affects livestock: vet (Western Producer, 19 October 2017) 

A veterinarian in Shaunavon, Sask., believes feed with glyphosate residue adversely affects cattle health. Dr. Ted Dupmeier, who operates his own practice at Shaunavon, told about 50 people at a recent event he called an awareness seminar that he began investigating after being unable to diagnose problems in a dairy herd in which cows were inexplicably dying. He said after removing feed that had been sprayed with glyphosate the problems were resolved.

SNAP Comment: Positive that this story was actually worth an article in the Western Producer. This "anecdote" supports the facts presented in the video Poisoned Fields - Glyphosate, the underrated risk? (HD 1080p)  (Jan 25, 2016)

Saturday, October 21, 2017

Poisoned Fields - Glyphosate, the underrated risk?

a 52 minute video looking at the new evidence of harm

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Poisoned Fields - Glyphosate, the underrated risk? (HD 1080p)  (Jan 25, 2016)

Glyphosate is the world’s most widely used weed killer. Some claim it is completely harmless, others say it is a serious health hazard for man and animals. A topical investigation into a controversial substance.

filed under fact sheets/glyphosate

Friday, October 20, 2017

Warning of 'ecological Armageddon' after dramatic plunge in insect numbers

Three-quarters of flying insects in nature reserves across Germany have vanished in 25 years, with serious implications for all life on Earth

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Warning of 'ecological Armageddon' after dramatic plunge in insect numbers  (Damian Carrington, Environment editor, The Guardian, 18 October 2017) 

“Insects make up about two-thirds of all life on Earth but there has been some kind of horrific decline,” said Prof Dave Goulson of Sussex University, UK, and part of the team behind the new study. “We appear to be making vast tracts of land inhospitable to most forms of life, and are currently on course for ecological Armageddon. If we lose the insects then everything is going to collapse.”

 "In September, a chief scientific adviser to the UK government warned that regulators around the world have falsely assumed that it is safe to use pesticides at industrial scales across landscapes and that the “effects of dosing whole landscapes with chemicals have been largely ignored”."

filed under wildlife/insects

This scientific paper is also covered by the National Post and the Washington Post, 19 October 2017)  Flying insects aren't getting spattlered on your windshield any more - and scientistsare concerned

Friday, October 6, 2017

A worldwide survey of neonicotinoids in honey

We found at least one of five tested compounds in 75% of all samples

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A worldwide survey of neonicotinoids in honey

E. A. D. Mitchell1,2,* et al  (Science  06 Oct 2017: Vol. 358, Issue 6359, pp. 109-111)

We assessed the global exposure of pollinators to neonicotinoids by analyzing 198 honey samples from across the world. We found at least one of five tested compounds (acetamiprid, clothianidin, imidacloprid, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) in 75% of all samples, 45% of samples contained two or more of these compounds, and 10% contained four or five. 

filed under neonicotinoids and  food

Saturday, September 30, 2017

Monsanto banned from European parliament

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Monsanto banned from European parliament (The Guardian, 28 Sept. 2017)
I wish we had rules like that in North America! We coud finally start cleaning up democracy, until compamies find a way around it.

'Monsanto lobbyists have been banned from entering the European parliament after the multinational refused to attend a parliamentary hearing into allegations of regulatory interference.'
It is the first time MEPs have used new rules to withdraw parliamentary access for firms that ignore a summons to attend parliamentary inquiries or hearings.'