• SNAP Tour of Organic Vegetable Garden
  • Grow a Lush Garden Organically
  • LIving Near Fields Increases Pesticide Exposure
  • Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • SNAP Display at Event
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Learn About Pesticides in Foods

Latest News...

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

Glyphosate perturbs the gut microbiota of honey bees

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Glyphosate perturbs the gut microbiota of honey bees  (Erick V. S. Motta, Kasie Raymann, and Nancy A. Moran, PNAS October 9, 2018 115 (41) 10305-10310) complete sccientific paper.

'The honey bee gut microbiota is dominated by eight bacterial species that promote weight gain and reduce pathogen susceptibility. The gene encoding EPSPS is present in almost all sequenced genomes of bee gut bacteria, indicating that they are potentially susceptible to glyphosate. We demonstrated that the relative and absolute abundances of dominant gut microbiota species are decreased in bees exposed to glyphosate at concentrations documented in the environment.

filed under bee die-off and pesticide fact sheets/glyphosate

Monday, December 17, 2018

Cardiovascular Disease Linked to Pesticide Exposure

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Cardiovascular Disease Linked to Pesticide Exposure  (Beyond Pesticides, December 17, 2018)

As Science Daily reports, “After taking account of potentially influential factors, including lifestyle and workplace factors, exposure to pesticides was associated with nearly six-fold higher odds of atrial fibrillation, while exposure to metals was associated with nearly four-fold higher odds.”...'A 2016 meta-review of research by Azizah Wahab, et al., and published in the International Journal of Community Medicine and Public Health, concluded that, “individual pesticide evaluation revealed significant association with non-fatal myocardial infarctionOrganochlorine pesticides are significantly associated with peripheral arterial disease and stroke. In severe poisonings, the general impression is that cardiac abnormalities are common. This systematic review suggests that pesticide exposure is associated with increased risk of CVD and CVD mortality.”'

filed under Health/Cardiovascular

Monday, December 17, 2018

“Safe Levels” Of Exposure Don’t Exist When It Comes To Monsanto’s Glyphosate Poison

interesting and accurate video on the state of research on glyphosate

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“Safe Levels” Of Exposure Don’t Exist When It Comes To Monsanto’s Glyphosate Poison (The Ring of Fire, Dec 16, 2018)

interesting and accurate video on the state of research on glyphosate.

The main ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup, glyphosate, is not safe, even at levels that the EPA is telling us is safe. Mike Papanotnio and Farron cousins discuss.

SNAP comment: Technically, neither the EPA or the PMRA can say a pesticide is 'safe" because all registered products are designed to kill. What they determine through LD50 (the dose that kills 1/2 fo the animals) put through some equations, is an acceptable dose i.e.a dose at which they don't think negative health effects will occur. Another issue with re-evaluation of pesticide is the people chosen to sit on the re-evaluation committees, many of whom have a long history of contracting with pesticide companies to do 'regulatory science'. The case of 2,4-D re-evaluation for home use in Canada (2005) illustrates that. The committee was formed of 2 industry-related 'experts', 1 PMRA official and 2 epidemiologsts. Studies of cancer in dogs were eliminated, and the cancer ones minimized so it remained on the Canadian market. The pesticide industry previously unsuccessfully tried to re-write the book on epidemiology so the burden of proof would be so high that all studies would be negative. Regulatory pesticide testing was designed decades ago and has not kept up with the science of low dose and endocrine effects so is totally meaningless in that regards.

filed under pesticide fact sheets/ chlorpyrifos 

Sunday, December 16, 2018

Vermont, Confirming Insect Apocalypse

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Vermont, Confirming Insect Apocalypse

(Beyond Pesticides, December 14, 2018) 'The richness, diversity, and abundance of wild bumblebees in Vermont has plummeted over the last century, according to an analysis from researchers at the University of Vermont and Vermont Center for Ecostudies (VCE). This research adds fresh evidence to the growing realization that mankind is witnessing and contributing to, as the New York Times recently labeled, a worldwide insect apocalypse.'

'According to the results, of the 17 bumblebee species considered native to Vermont, four showed evidence of significant declines, and four are simply not detected, leading researchers to the conclusion they are likely to be locally extinct...Overall Vermont’s pollinators experienced significant declines in species richness (the number of different species found), abundance (the number of pollinators found), and diversity (a measure of species richness and relative abundance).'

filed under wildlife/insects

Sunday, December 16, 2018

U.S. Asks World Trade Organization to Force Lower International Safety Standards

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U.S. Asks World Trade Organization to Force Lower International Safety Standards

(Beyond Pesticides, December 13, 2018) 'The U.S. is pushing back against international standards that restrict pesticides by appealing to the World Trade Organization (WTO) to intervene. At issue are new EU maximum residue levels (MRLs) on food for the following pesticides: buprofezin, diflubenzuron, ethoxysulfurom, ioxynil, molinate, picoxystrobin and tepraloxydim.'

'Taking issue with the new MRLs – as with all other STCs mentioned above – the U.S. said new MRLs would cause barriers to trade, and therefore, must be rejected by the WTO. Advocates point to the introduction of GMOs as an example of the U.S. using the WTO to block standards that restrict potentially hazardous products.'...

'In her book Stolen Harvest: The hijacking of the global food supply, Vandana Shiva, PhD, says, “The right to food, the right to safety, the right to culture, are all being treated as trade barriers that for the continuation of the WTO need to be dismantled.” Dr. Shiva continues, “The WTO’s Agreement on Agriculture legalizes the dumping of genetically-engineered foods on countries and criminalizes actions to protect the biological and cultural diversity on which diverse food systems are based.”'

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Pesticides Contaminate Medical and Recreational Marijuana

pesticides not registered for use in the crop, and fraud.

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Pesticides Contaminate Medical and Recreational Marijuana  (Beyond Pesticides, December 7, 2018)

'Colorado’s recent experience is a case in point: in early December, the state’s Marijuana Enforcement Division (MED) announced two recalls on cannabis products out of concern about their contamination by pesticide residues...Three off-label pesticides were listed in the recall announcement. Pyriproxyfen was found in samples tested from Colorado Wellness Centers LLC (dba Lush), and bifenthrin and diuron were found in samples from Crossroads Wellness LLC (dba Boulder Botanics). None of those compounds is approved by Colorado for use on marijuana; two are listed as possible carcinogens by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).'

'At roughly the same time came news out of California of a decidedly human glitch in that state’s recreational cannabis rollout: when the state’s new, mandated, and rigorous cannabis testing protocols became operational on July 1 of 2018, a lab director — at Sequoia Analytical Labs of Sacramento — allegedly began to falsify analyses of hundreds of batches of cannabis that went out to retailers. The alleged fraud continued for some months, without the knowledge of anyone else at the company.'

'Colorado, Washington State, and Oregon have all taken steps to list “allowable” pesticides for marijuana cultivation. California began in June 2018 to set out parameters for testing of cannabis; at this juncture, all cannabis for medical and recreational use must be tested for 66 different proscribed pesticides, as well as for other contaminants, such as E. coli,  feces, mold, insect and rodent parts, mycotoxins, terpenoids, and heavy metals. The regulatory matrix in the states is dynamic, and events such as Colorado’s recalls and California’s fraudulent lab reporting may spur further adjustments.'

SNAP Comment: Does anyone know what testing there is in Canada? or is it just assumed, as it is for all registered pesticides, that users will follow the label because it is a legal document?

filed under pesticides in drugs

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

DDT in Glacial Melt Puts Alaskan Communities at Risk

DDT has also deposited in Canadian mountain glaciers and is put into circulation again.

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DDT in Glacial Melt Puts Alaskan Communities at Risk  (Beyond Pesticides, December 11, 2018) 

SNAP Comment: In addition to pesticide aerial transport causing deposition in the far North, similar Canadian and world studies have detected DDT and several other pesticides in all mountain glaciers studied including in Banff and Jasper where the mountain aquatic organisms and fish contained higher pesticide levels than those of the Arctic. The ice is certainly melting off most glaciers of the world, putting these pesticides in circulation, and the environment and people at risk everywhere.

filed under water

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Camera-wielding robot records effects of pesticide on bees’ behavior

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Camera-wielding robot records effects of pesticide on bees’ behavior  (Mongabey, by Stephanie Parker on 21 November 2018)

'The team found that bumblebees exposed to environmentally realistic amounts of neonicotinoid compounds reduced their nursing and caretaking activities at night and were less able to regulate the colony’s temperature, among other behavioral changes that may impact their population.' SNAP comment: A very sophisticated experiment with results indicating that curent pesticide testing is woefully inadequate to prevent damage. 

filed under wildlife/insects

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

Beekeepers at Risk of Losing Hives after Mosquito Insecticide Spraying

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Beekeepers at Risk of Losing Hives after Mosquito Insecticide Spraying  (Beyond Pesticides, November 21, 2018) A study published last month in the Journal of Apicultural Research finds significant numbers of U.S. honey bees at risk after exposure to hazardous synthetic pesticides intended to control mosquitoes. With many beekeepers rarely given warning of insecticide spraying, researchers say the risk of losing colonies could increase.

SNAP Comment: The Saskatchewan government West Nile virus program trained municipal workers in identifyng mosquito larvae breeding grounds and using the bacterium Bti as larvicide for mosquito control This program has been discontinued by the SaskParty. However, some municipalities have kept on using malathion or other insecticide fogging and some routinely spray the area of upcoming events with insecticides. Check with your municipality on their approach and policy. 

filed under Bee Die-Off

Wednesday, December 12, 2018

new pesticides in glaciers page on SNAP

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pesticides in water/pesticides in glaciers. Includes Canadian study