• Learn About Pesticides in Foods
  • LIving Near Fields Increases Pesticide Exposure
  • SNAP Display at Event
  • Learn to Manage Pests Naturally
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Driving Near Recently Sprayed Fields Exposes People to Pesticides
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Link to SK Organic Resources

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Monday, June 18, 2018

Guide pratique des trucs et conseils en horticulture écologique

French language guide to pesticide alternatives

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Guide pratique des trucs et conseils en horticulture écologique (Equiterre, from Quebec, added in June 2018)
Les conseils qui suivent concernent certains des problèmes les plus courants en horticulture. Contrairement aux pesticides, vous pouvez en faire usage sans modération! Rappelez-vous que la prévention et l’adaptation à l’environnement sont les principaux alliés de la pratique horticole écologique.

In French. deals with alternatives to pesticides for lawns, several insects, and a few weeds such as poison ivy (herbe a puces), dandelions (pissenlit) and herbe a poux (ragweed).

filed under alternatives

Sunday, June 17, 2018

CN Annual Vegetation Management Program

using herbicides

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CN Annual Vegetation Management Program

CN is required to clear its rights-of-way from any vegetation that may pose a safety hazard. Part II of the Rules Respecting Track Safety adopted by Transport Canada provide that “vegetation on railway property which is on or immediately adjacent to roadbed must be controlled.” Vegetation on railway right-of-way, if left uncontrolled, can contribute to trackside fires, reductions in visibility at road crossings, damage to integrity of the railway roadbed and impair proper inspection of track infrastructure.

Monday, June 4, 2018

Deforestation Found to Cause Malaria to Spread, in the Face of Harmful and Ineffective Mosquito Insecticide Use

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Deforestation Found to Cause Malaria to Spread, in the Face of Harmful and Ineffective Mosquito Insecticide Use (Beyond Pesticides, May 31, 2018)

'Deforestation fragments the forest landscape, creating more forest “edges,” which means more places for mosquitoes to breed. This fragmentation may also help malaria-carrying mosquitoes spread to other areas as adults... Beyond Pesticides advocates the fighting of malaria without poisoning future generations of children in malaria hot spots. We should be advocating for a just world in which we no longer treat poverty and development challenges with poisonous band-aids, but instead, join together to address the root causes of insect-borne disease, because the chemical-dependent alternatives are ultimately deadly for everyone.”'

Monday, June 4, 2018

PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF PRIORITY PESTICIDES IN SELECTED CANADIAN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS

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PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF PRIORITY PESTICIDES IN SELECTED CANADIAN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS. (Water Science and Technology Directorate Environment Canada, March 2011)

This report explains the study design and results, and the state of pesticide use data.

"There is no central registry of pesticide sales or use data in Canada... a national source of sales and use data will become available in the near future. Several Canadian provinces and territories maintain sales and/or use records within their jurisdictions, or they commission regular surveys to determine which active ingredients are being sold and used. In some cases, provincial pesticide legislation requires that this information be collected. Together, these data provide a national patchwork of sales and/or use data." (p.6)" Detailed information on pesticide sales and use is lacking for Saskatchewan. However, some information is available on pesticide use in Saskatchewan in Donald et al. (1999), Donald et al. (2001) and in “protected” documents from the 1990s. In Saskatchewan, commonly used pesticides include glyphosate, 2,4-D, MCPA and bromoxynil. Brimble et al. (2005) reported that l Saskatchewan is the greatest user of pesticides in Canada, accounting for an estimated 36% of totaCanadian sales." (p. 8)

filed under Water

Monday, June 4, 2018

This common toothpaste ingredient could be wreaking havoc on your gut

Triclosan is everywhere, but its days seem to be numbered.

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This common toothpaste ingredient could be wreaking havoc on your gut (Popular Science,  Neel V. Patel, May 31, 2018)

Triclosan is a registered pesticide in Canada and the US.and likely everywhere. Problems have been identified with triclosan since at least 2011. It builds up in the body and the environment. Canada was to declare triclosan toxic to the environment in 2012. In spite of this, it is still in toothpaste, soap and many other products. Another illustration that our regulatory system is truly designed to allow products to remain on the market as long as possible in spite of the evidence of harm.

filed in antibacterials

Monday, June 4, 2018

Research Shows Greenspace and Biodiversity Protect Kids from Asthma

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Research Shows Greenspace and Biodiversity Protect Kids from Asthma  (Beyond Pesticides, May 17, 2018)  

Of concern are the pesticides used in green spaces. Includes links to  Beyond Pesticides’ brochure, Asthma, Children, and Pesticides and El Asma, los Niños y los Pesticidas: Lo que usted debe saber para proteger a su familia, and Children and Pesticides Don’t Mix.

filed under  respiratory

Monday, June 4, 2018

Connecticut State Legislature Bans Residential Mosquito Misters

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Connecticut State Legislature Bans Residential Mosquito Misters (Beyond Pesticides, May 23, 2018) 

" Many health advocates have expressed concern that these products, able to spray toxic pesticides on a timer at regular intervals, pose a significant risk to pets and children who can be directly in the path of a mister’s spray. The chemicals employed in these machines are often synthetic pyrethroids, which have been linked to a range of human health effects, from early puberty in boys, to behavioral disorders, learning problems, ADHD, and certain cancers. Neighbors who do not want to be exposed to these chemicals are also put at risk from pesticide drift." 

SNAP Comment: There are many kinds of  pyrethrins coming under various names. A quick PMRA label search done on 4 June 2018 indicates 368 pyrethrin products registered in Canada for domestic use (i.e. by consumers) At least 2 of those pyrethrin products  (# 29683 and 28972) are registered for misters. A complete search would have to be made for each registered pyrethroid to understand the extent of the problem in Canada. 

filed under Pyrethrins and Pyrethroids

Monday, June 4, 2018

PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF PRIORITY PESTICIDES IN SELECTED CANADIAN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS

view details »

PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF PRIORITY PESTICIDES IN SELECTED CANADIAN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS. (Water Science and Technology Directorate Environment Canada, March 2011)

This report explains the study design and results, and the state of pesticide use data.

"There is no central registry of pesticide sales or use data in Canada... a national source of sales and use data will become available in the near future. Several Canadian provinces and territories maintain sales and/or use records within their jurisdictions, or they commission regular surveys to determine which active ingredients are being sold and used. In some cases, provincial pesticide legislation requires that this information be collected. Together, these data provide a national patchwork of sales and/or use data." (p.6)" Detailed information on pesticide sales and use is lacking for Saskatchewan. However, some information is available on pesticide use in Saskatchewan in Donald et al. (1999), Donald et al. (2001) and in “protected” documents from the 1990s. In Saskatchewan, commonly used pesticides include glyphosate, 2,4-D, MCPA and bromoxynil. Brimble et al. (2005) reported that Saskatchewan is the greatest user of pesticides in Canada, accounting for an estimated 36% of total Canadian sales." (p. 8)  see also Pesticide Use and Sales - SK It is my understanding that there are no longer Environment Canada researchers working on pesticides in SK, and that the Prairie research is curently done in Alberta. (June 2018)

filed under Water/Canada

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Neonicotinoids may alter estrogen production in humans

An INRS team publishes the first-ever in vitro study demonstrating the potential effects of these pesticides on human health

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Neonicotinoids may alter estrogen production in humans (INRS,April 26, 2018,/ by Stéphanie Thibault)   

An INRS team publishes the first-ever in vitro study demonstrating the potential effects of these pesticides on human health in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. 

The results of the study show an increase in aromatase expression and a unique change in the pattern in which aromatase was expressed, which is similar to that observed in the development of certain breast cancers.

Filed under neonicotinoids and cancer/Links between individal chemicals...

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Glyphosate Monograph

seems like the mot up to date compendium of information.

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Glyphosate Monograph (PAN, 2016) seems like the mot up to date compendium of information.

filed under glyphosate