• Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Grow a Lush Garden Organically
  • Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • SNAP Display at Event
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Learn to Manage Pests Naturally
  • SNAP Tour of Organic Vegetable Garden
  • Driving Near Recently Sprayed Fields Exposes People to Pesticides

Latest News...

Friday, August 18, 2017

Beyond Pesticides Journal Articles Link Pesticides to Soil Microbiota and Gut Microbiome Poisoning and Resulting Diseases

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Beyond Pesticides Journal Articles Link Pesticides to Soil Microbiota and Gut Microbiome Poisoning and Resulting Diseases

(Beyond Pesticides, August 15, 2017) With increasing scientific understanding about the importance of beneficial bacteria in soil and the human body —microbiota in the soil and microbiome in the human gut, the summer 2017 issue of Beyond Pesticides’ journal, Pesticides and You, publishes two critical articles to advance the importance of community discussion and action on organic and sustainable practices. The lead article, Sustaining Life: From Soil Microbiota to Gut Microbiome by professor of geomorphology (University of Washington) and author David Montgomery, PhD, contains excerpts from Dr. Montgomery’s talk to Beyond Pesticides’ 35th National Pesticide Forum, documenting the importance of soil microbiota to healthy soil, resilient plants, and sustainability. Also in the Journal, Monsanto’s Roundup (Glyphosate) Exposed, by Terry Shistar, Ph.D., documents the science linking the most widely used herbicide on the planet, Monsanto’s glyphosate, to the blocking of an enzyme that supports the essential pathway for beneficial bacteria, critical to human health.

talks are available for free on Beyond Pesticides youtube channel

Friday, August 18, 2017

Beyond Pesticides Sues Mott’s for Labeling Pesticide-Laden Applesauce “Natural”

The Labeling wars...

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Beyond Pesticides Sues Mott’s for Labeling Pesticide-Laden Applesauce “Natural”

(Beyond Pesticides, May 5, 2017)  One of the unfortunate side effects of living in countries where chemical pesticides are at the forefront of agriculture is the widespread contamination of our food and water with them. In this case the neonicotinoid insecticide acetamiprid.
 

Friday, August 18, 2017

Rod Cumberland - Presentation on the effects of glyphosate on deer

Indirect effect but massive.

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Rod Cumberland - Presentation on the effects of glyphosate on deer

A New Brusnwick deer biologist explains how he researched the problem of the tumbling New Brunswick deeer population and what he found. Softwood tree plantations sprayed with RoundUp to eliminate any other growth are the culprit. No food left for deer or most other species.

Indirect effect but massive. Very interesting. the kind of thing one suspects, but to find someone who investigated it is great. A new piece in the puzzle of how we destroy the earth that sustains us.
filed under wildlife/mammals

Monday, August 14, 2017

Popular Pesticides Keep Bumblebees From Laying Eggs

the reduction in reproduction is so large that wild bumblebee populations exposed to these chemicals could enter a spiral of decline and eventually die out.

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Popular Pesticides Keep Bumblebees From Laying Eggs  (The Salt, August 14, 2017)

The scientists, based at Royal Holloway University of London, set up a laboratory experiment with bumblebee queens. They fed those queens a syrup containing traces of a neonicotinoid pesticide called thiamethoxam, and the amount of the pesticide, they say, was similar to what bees living near fields of neonic-treated canola might be exposed to.

Bumblebee queens exposed to the pesticide were 26 percent less likely to lay eggs, compared to queens that weren't exposed to the pesticide. The team published their findings in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution.... According to Raine and his colleagues, the reduction in reproduction is so large that wild bumblebee populations exposed to these chemicals could enter a spiral of decline and eventually die out.

filed under wildlife/insects

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

EPA Rejects Pesticide Use in Cannabis Production, Paves Way for Organic Marijuana

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EPA Rejects Pesticide Use in Cannabis Production, Paves Way for Organic Marijuana

(Beyond Pesticides, July 25, 2017) With the legalization of medical and recreational marijuana in dozens of states, the question of pesticide use in commercial cannabis production and resulting residues in a range of products is a burning issue. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) injected itself into this question when last week it issued a notice of intent to disapprove the planned registration of four pesticides for cannabis production by the state of California...Over the past several years, cannabis production has been marred by consistent reports of contamination with illegal pesticides. States where the substance is legal have experienced large recalls over contamination. In 2015, the Governor of Colorado issued an executive order declaring pesticide-tainted pot “A threat to public safety.” The pesticide most often cited for illegal use on cannabis is a fungicide called Eagle 20, which contains the active ingredient myclobutanil. Myclobutanil is an endocrine (hormone) disruptor that can turn into cyanide gas when ignited. It is also listed as a reproductive toxicant under California’s Proposition 65: Chemicals Known to the State to Cause Cancer or Reproductive Toxicity.

filed under pesticides in drugs

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Millions of eggs removed from European shelves over toxicity fear

Fipronil is an insecticide used to get rid of fleas, lice and ticks on pets but is not allowed in food production

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Millions of eggs removed from European shelves over toxicity fears (The Guardian, 3 Aug.2017)

Food contamination is not an unknown occurrence in Canada either.

Fipronil is an insecticide used to get rid of fleas, lice and ticks on pets but is not allowed in food production. If ingested long term the highy toxic can damage the liver, thyroid gland and kidneys.
...but it's OK for pets... When you buy a flea product, pease check the ingredients.

filed under food and pets
 

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Crop Damage from Monsanto’s Herbicide Dicamba Being Investigated in 17 States, Pointing to New Formulation Used in GE Fields

Dicamba, a toxic pesticide prone to drift off the target site, has been used in agriculture for decades.

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Crop Damage from Monsanto’s Herbicide Dicamba Being Investigated in 17 States, Pointing to New Formulation Used in GE Fields

(Beyond Pesticides, August 8, 2017) More than 1,400 official complaints of crop damage related to the herbicide dicamba have been recorded across 17 states this year, leading some to question a new formulation of the chemical used in genetically engineered (GE) fields. 

Dicamba, a toxic pesticide prone to drift off the target site, has been used in agriculture for decades. However, new GE crops developed by Monsanto must be paired with specific formulations of dicamba, and until now many believed these drift incidents were the result of illegal formulations of dicamba being applied to fields. But the extent of damage now being observed, covering over 2.5 million acres, is casting doubt on this theory, and raising more questions as to whether the new dicamba formulation is actually the cause of the widespread drift damage.

Fruits and vegetables, as well as other crops that are not genetically engineered to tolerate dicamba are often left cupped and distorted when exposed to the chemical.

SNAP Comments: Last year, the incidents were due to illegal formulations used because the dicamba-resistant crops were put on the market before  the "less volatile" new formulations were approved for use. Looks like the new ones are no better.... Remember that all most chemical lawn herbicide formulations contin dicama as one of 3 active ingredients. 

filed under pesticide drift

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

National Academy of Sciences Urges EPA to Study Low Dose Endocrine Disruption

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National Academy of Sciences Urges EPA to Study Low Dose Endocrine Disruption

(Beyond Pesticides, July 24, 2017) A new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NAS) is recommending to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) a strategy to evaluate the evidence of adverse human health effects from low doses of exposure to chemicals that can disrupt the endocrine system... In 2013, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and the World Health Organization (WHO) declared Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals a global health threat. A 2016 report concluded that exposures to endocrine disrupting chemicals costs the U.S. more than $340 billion annually in  health care costs and lost wages.

SNAP Comment: As far as I can tell, the test panel mandated to register a pesticide in Canada still dates from 1984. While the US was forced by a law suit to add one endocrine test  few years ago, Canada did not follow suit. Researchers in the field of endocrine disruption were not impressed with the test chosen because it is outdated. So, for all practical purposes, pesticides are not tested in any significant way for endocrine disruption in North America. My other concern is how the Canadian PMRA and US EPA evaluate risk. Their risk assessment is still based on the now outdated concept of "the dose makes the poison" . This cannot fit in the concept of endocrine disruption which shows effects at current environmental exposures and lower, well below the exposures the regulatory approach currently allows.

filed under endocrine disruption

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Glyphosate Stresses Tadpoles to Produce More Venom

both in a laboratory setting, as well as a mesocosm

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Glyphosate Stresses Tadpoles to Produce More Venom  (Beyond Pesticides, August 9, 2017)

Scientists tested the effects of formulated glyphosate products on toad tadpoles through experiments in a laboratory setting, as well as a mesocosm, a controlled outdoor environment that replicates natural conditions. 

This is not the first instance of glyphosate altering the normal development of amphibians. Earlier this year, the same team of researchers found that glyphosate products reduced the survival and growth of common toads, and otherwise slowed down their development. A 2012 study from the University of Pittsburg found that glyphosate induced morphological changes in the development of leopard and wood frogs similar to those seen under significant predatory threat.

The results of accumulated scientific research on stress-induced changes following glyphosate exposure points to underlying flaws in U.S. regulation of pesticides. Ecosystem-wide impacts caused by the secondary effects of pesticide use are rarely, if ever, considered under the risk assessment framework used to register pesticides.

filed under Wildlife/ Frogs

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Uncovered: Monsanto campaign to get Séralini study retracted

The documents also show that the editor of the journal that first published the study entered into a contract with Monsanto in the period shortly before the retraction campaign began.

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From the writings of Monsanto themselves.
Uncovered: Monsanto campaign to get Séralini study retracted 

Internal Monsanto documents released by attorneys leading US cancer litigation show that the company launched a concerted campaign to force the retraction of a study that revealed toxic effects of Roundup. The documents also show that the editor of the journal that first published the study entered into a contract with Monsanto in the period shortly before the retraction campaign began.

EU regulators side with Monsanto

To the public’s detriment, some regulatory bodies have backed Monsanto rather than the public interest and have backed off the notion that long-term studies should be required for GM crops. In fact, the EU is considering doing away with even the short 90-day animal feeding studies currently required under European GMO legislation. This will be based in part on the results of the EU-funded GRACE animal feeding project, which has come under fire for the industry links of some of the scientists involved and for its alleged manipulation of findings of adverse effects on rats fed Monsanto’s GM MON810 maize.

filed under industry shenanigans