• LIving Near Fields Increases Pesticide Exposure
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • Learn to Manage Pests Naturally
  • SNAP Tour of Organic Vegetable Garden
  • Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Driving Near Recently Sprayed Fields Exposes People to Pesticides
  • Learn About Pesticides in Foods
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • SNAP Display at Event

Archives for 2018

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Monsanto Judge Won't Block Cancer Victims' Key Witnesses

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Monsanto Judge Won't Block Cancer Victims' Key Witnesses

(Joel Rosenblatt, Bloombeg, July 10, 2018)

Friday, July 13, 2018

Monsanto’s Roundup on Trial: Day 2 in Court

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Monsanto’s Roundup on Trial: Day 2 in Court (by Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Organic Consumers Association, July 11, 2018)

"The email said:

“It would take quite some time and money/studies to get him there. We simply aren’t going to do the studies Parry suggests… We should seriously start looking for one or more other individuals. We have not made much progress in ginning up studies to prove RoundUp non-genotoxic and are currently very vulnerable in this area.”

In the end, Monsanto considered converting Parry too costly.

Subsequent emails revealed during the afternoon video testimony of Monsanto’s Dr. William Heydens show that Monsanto ultimately rejected the strategy of bribing legitimate scientists (“We could be pushing $250K or maybe even more”) and concluded that:

“a less expensive/more palatable approach might be to involve experts only for the areas of contention, epidemiology and possibly MOA Mechanism of Action (depending on what comes out of the IARC meeting), and we ghost-write the Exposure Tox & Genotox sections. An option would be to add apparently independent tame Monsanto scientists Greim and Kier or Kirkland to have their names on the publication, but we would be keeping the cost down by us doing the writing and they would just edit and sign their names so to speak. Recall that is how we handled Williams Kroes & Monroe.” 

includes linsto the papers published

Wednesday, July 11, 2018

Estimated Annual Agricultural Pesticide Use in the US

Pesticide Use Maps

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Estimated Annual Agricultural Pesticide Use in the US
Pesticide Use Maps

Would that we had something like that in Canada!

filed under Pesticide Use and Sales

Sunday, July 8, 2018

Costco takes stand on insecticides

Costco wants producers of fruits, vegetables and garden plants to stop using neonicotinoids,

 Costco takes stand on insecticides  Western Producer, 5 July 2018) 

'The grocery store chain, with more than 600 stores in the United States and Canada, said in May that it wants producers of fruits, vegetables and garden plants to stop using neonicotinoids, a class of insecticides commonly known as neonics.'

'Suppliers are encouraged to phase out the use of neonicotinoids and chlorpyrifos (an insecticide),” Costco said on its website.'

“We seek to partner with suppliers who share our commitment to pollinator health and IPM (integrated pest management).”

SNAP comment: good news. I hope it covers all neonics not only imidacloprid which may be banned by Canada. I don't understand how the PMRA can conclude that a systemic pesticide can be systemic only in some uses. It defies logic: '“Certain uses of products containing imidacloprid result in uptake by plants where it then moves into nectar and/or pollen,” said Scott Kirby, director general of environmental assessment with Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency.'
filed under factsheets/ neonicotinoids
Saturday, July 7, 2018

Dynasteam Weed Steamer

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Dynasteam Weed Steamer  availablet Canadan Tire. 

Monday, July 2, 2018

75% of non-organic spinach contaminated with a neurotoxic bug killer that is banned in Europe

US test but a lot of our spinach likely comes from there.

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75% of non-organic spinach contaminated with a neurotoxic bug killer that is banned in Europe (NaturalHealth365)  (USDA most recen tests)

The most common contaminant is permethrin as well as 3 fungicides.  This article also deals with the widespread food contamination with permethrin as well as new research indicating a likely link to ADHD. ( with links)

415  pesticide products containing permethrin are registered in Canada as of 2 July 2018. They include fle and tick sprays for dogs and cats 
Pyrethrins (general name for a number of related chemicals) are also found in insect sprays like 'Raid'. Permethrin may be present in 2 brands of mosquito coils (21 registered Canadian products) indicating active ingredients as 'pyrethrins", which is a mixture. Most other mosquito coils contain another type of pyrethrin called D-CIS,TRANS-ALLETHRIN and 1 contains METOFLUTHRIN (Off). Two products contain the least toxic non-pyrethrin citronella but check the ingredients to ensure they don't also contain allethrin or other pyrethrins. Allethrin seems to be the most commonly registered pyrethrin in Canada. (121 labels)

filed under pyrethrins/heath effects and pesticides in food 
 

Sunday, July 1, 2018

Monsanto Relied on These “Partners” to Attack Top Cancer Scientists

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Monsanto Relied on These “Partners” to Attack Top Cancer Scientists  (U.S. Right to Know, May 31, 2018 by Stacy Malkan)

filed under Industry Shenanigans

Monday, June 18, 2018

Guide pratique des trucs et conseils en horticulture écologique

French language guide to pesticide alternatives

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Guide pratique des trucs et conseils en horticulture écologique (Equiterre, from Quebec, added in June 2018)
Les conseils qui suivent concernent certains des problèmes les plus courants en horticulture. Contrairement aux pesticides, vous pouvez en faire usage sans modération! Rappelez-vous que la prévention et l’adaptation à l’environnement sont les principaux alliés de la pratique horticole écologique.

In French. deals with alternatives to pesticides for lawns, several insects, and a few weeds such as poison ivy (herbe a puces), dandelions (pissenlit) and herbe a poux (ragweed).

filed under alternatives

Sunday, June 17, 2018

CN Annual Vegetation Management Program

using herbicides

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CN Annual Vegetation Management Program

CN is required to clear its rights-of-way from any vegetation that may pose a safety hazard. Part II of the Rules Respecting Track Safety adopted by Transport Canada provide that “vegetation on railway property which is on or immediately adjacent to roadbed must be controlled.” Vegetation on railway right-of-way, if left uncontrolled, can contribute to trackside fires, reductions in visibility at road crossings, damage to integrity of the railway roadbed and impair proper inspection of track infrastructure.

Monday, June 4, 2018

Connecticut State Legislature Bans Residential Mosquito Misters

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Connecticut State Legislature Bans Residential Mosquito Misters (Beyond Pesticides, May 23, 2018) 

" Many health advocates have expressed concern that these products, able to spray toxic pesticides on a timer at regular intervals, pose a significant risk to pets and children who can be directly in the path of a mister’s spray. The chemicals employed in these machines are often synthetic pyrethroids, which have been linked to a range of human health effects, from early puberty in boys, to behavioral disorders, learning problems, ADHD, and certain cancers. Neighbors who do not want to be exposed to these chemicals are also put at risk from pesticide drift." 

SNAP Comment: There are many kinds of  pyrethrins coming under various names. A quick PMRA label search done on 4 June 2018 indicates 368 pyrethrin products registered in Canada for domestic use (i.e. by consumers) At least 2 of those pyrethrin products  (# 29683 and 28972) are registered for misters. A complete search would have to be made for each registered pyrethroid to understand the extent of the problem in Canada. 

filed under Pyrethrins and Pyrethroids

Monday, June 4, 2018

PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF PRIORITY PESTICIDES IN SELECTED CANADIAN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS

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PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF PRIORITY PESTICIDES IN SELECTED CANADIAN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS. (Water Science and Technology Directorate Environment Canada, March 2011)

This report explains the study design and results, and the state of pesticide use data.

"There is no central registry of pesticide sales or use data in Canada... a national source of sales and use data will become available in the near future. Several Canadian provinces and territories maintain sales and/or use records within their jurisdictions, or they commission regular surveys to determine which active ingredients are being sold and used. In some cases, provincial pesticide legislation requires that this information be collected. Together, these data provide a national patchwork of sales and/or use data." (p.6)" Detailed information on pesticide sales and use is lacking for Saskatchewan. However, some information is available on pesticide use in Saskatchewan in Donald et al. (1999), Donald et al. (2001) and in “protected” documents from the 1990s. In Saskatchewan, commonly used pesticides include glyphosate, 2,4-D, MCPA and bromoxynil. Brimble et al. (2005) reported that Saskatchewan is the greatest user of pesticides in Canada, accounting for an estimated 36% of total Canadian sales." (p. 8)  see also Pesticide Use and Sales - SK It is my understanding that there are no longer Environment Canada researchers working on pesticides in SK, and that the Prairie research is curently done in Alberta. (June 2018)

filed under Water/Canada

Monday, June 4, 2018

Deforestation Found to Cause Malaria to Spread, in the Face of Harmful and Ineffective Mosquito Insecticide Use

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Deforestation Found to Cause Malaria to Spread, in the Face of Harmful and Ineffective Mosquito Insecticide Use (Beyond Pesticides, May 31, 2018)

'Deforestation fragments the forest landscape, creating more forest “edges,” which means more places for mosquitoes to breed. This fragmentation may also help malaria-carrying mosquitoes spread to other areas as adults... Beyond Pesticides advocates the fighting of malaria without poisoning future generations of children in malaria hot spots. We should be advocating for a just world in which we no longer treat poverty and development challenges with poisonous band-aids, but instead, join together to address the root causes of insect-borne disease, because the chemical-dependent alternatives are ultimately deadly for everyone.”'

Monday, June 4, 2018

PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF PRIORITY PESTICIDES IN SELECTED CANADIAN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS

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PRESENCE AND LEVELS OF PRIORITY PESTICIDES IN SELECTED CANADIAN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS. (Water Science and Technology Directorate Environment Canada, March 2011)

This report explains the study design and results, and the state of pesticide use data.

"There is no central registry of pesticide sales or use data in Canada... a national source of sales and use data will become available in the near future. Several Canadian provinces and territories maintain sales and/or use records within their jurisdictions, or they commission regular surveys to determine which active ingredients are being sold and used. In some cases, provincial pesticide legislation requires that this information be collected. Together, these data provide a national patchwork of sales and/or use data." (p.6)" Detailed information on pesticide sales and use is lacking for Saskatchewan. However, some information is available on pesticide use in Saskatchewan in Donald et al. (1999), Donald et al. (2001) and in “protected” documents from the 1990s. In Saskatchewan, commonly used pesticides include glyphosate, 2,4-D, MCPA and bromoxynil. Brimble et al. (2005) reported that l Saskatchewan is the greatest user of pesticides in Canada, accounting for an estimated 36% of totaCanadian sales." (p. 8)

filed under Water

Monday, June 4, 2018

This common toothpaste ingredient could be wreaking havoc on your gut

Triclosan is everywhere, but its days seem to be numbered.

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This common toothpaste ingredient could be wreaking havoc on your gut (Popular Science,  Neel V. Patel, May 31, 2018)

Triclosan is a registered pesticide in Canada and the US.and likely everywhere. Problems have been identified with triclosan since at least 2011. It builds up in the body and the environment. Canada was to declare triclosan toxic to the environment in 2012. In spite of this, it is still in toothpaste, soap and many other products. Another illustration that our regulatory system is truly designed to allow products to remain on the market as long as possible in spite of the evidence of harm.

filed in antibacterials

Monday, June 4, 2018

Research Shows Greenspace and Biodiversity Protect Kids from Asthma

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Research Shows Greenspace and Biodiversity Protect Kids from Asthma  (Beyond Pesticides, May 17, 2018)  

Of concern are the pesticides used in green spaces. Includes links to  Beyond Pesticides’ brochure, Asthma, Children, and Pesticides and El Asma, los Niños y los Pesticidas: Lo que usted debe saber para proteger a su familia, and Children and Pesticides Don’t Mix.

filed under  respiratory

Sunday, June 3, 2018

Neonicotinoids may alter estrogen production in humans

An INRS team publishes the first-ever in vitro study demonstrating the potential effects of these pesticides on human health

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Neonicotinoids may alter estrogen production in humans (INRS,April 26, 2018,/ by Stéphanie Thibault)   

An INRS team publishes the first-ever in vitro study demonstrating the potential effects of these pesticides on human health in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. 

The results of the study show an increase in aromatase expression and a unique change in the pattern in which aromatase was expressed, which is similar to that observed in the development of certain breast cancers.

Filed under neonicotinoids and cancer/Links between individal chemicals...

Sunday, May 20, 2018

Glyphosate Monograph

seems like the mot up to date compendium of information.

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Glyphosate Monograph (PAN, 2016) seems like the mot up to date compendium of information.

filed under glyphosate

Friday, May 4, 2018

Indicator of the Risk of Water Contamination by Pesticides

the level of risk increased on 50% of agricultural land, primarily due to an increase in the area treated with pesticides and to unusually wet weather in the Maritimes and the Prairies in 2010.

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Pesticides Indicator  (Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Date modified:   2016-07-11) with interactive maps and legend. A lot of high risk land in Saskatchewan.

The Pesticides Indicator (official name: Indicator of the Risk of Water Contamination by Pesticides) evaluates the relative risk of water contamination by pesticides across agricultural areas in Canada. It can be used to assess pesticide inputs to cropland and the amount of pesticide transported to surface and ground water. This indicator has tracked pesticide risk associated with Canadian agricultural activities from 1981 to 2011.

Overall state and trend

Pesticide risk has been increasing on agricultural lands in Canada, although the majority of agricultural land is still considered to be at low or very low risk. From 1981 to 2011, the level of risk increased on 50% of agricultural land, primarily due to an increase in the area treated with pesticides and to unusually wet weather in the Maritimes and the Prairies in 2010.

Generally speaking, the increases in risk observed in between 2006 and 2011 were caused by an increase in the area treated with pesticides; in Eastern Canada and the Maritimes, this can be attributed to shifts from pasture and forage production to annual cropping systems, and in the Prairies to ongoing shifts from conventional tillage to reduced tillage and no-till systems, which require greater herbicide use for weed control. Between 2006 and 2011, there was a marked increase in the use of fungicides in the Prairies (from 3.7% to 7.5% of the land area) which can be attributed to wetter-than-usual weather in 2010, as well the shift to reduced tillage systems, both of which increase the risk of fungal diseases such as fusarium blight. Another factor that may have contributed to the increase in pesticide use per unit cropland in recent years is the expansion of land devoted to glyphosate-tolerant canola, soybeans and corn and the mass of glyphosate herbicide applied in these systems.

...Pesticide residues have been detected in surface and ground water in monitoring studies conducted in various regions of Canada, raising concerns for potential adverse effects on wildlife as well as on drinking water quality.

SNAP Comment: I just became aware of this document so am adding it to the web site. 1.The assessment is based on "the percentage of agricultural land area treated with pesticides for all Census years". However, this likely does not take into consideration use by power companies, railroads, and use in forestry, and likely not the use in urban areas. Therefore the quantity of treated acres seems to strictly refer to agriculture and the problem may be worse than estimated. 2. Considering that pesticide residues have been detected in surface and ground water in monitoring studies conducted in various regions of Canada including the Prairies, I am not sure it is an acceptable risk. 3. With widespread flooding of the 2010-16 years in Saskatchewan, there has obviously been a lot of pesticides entering water from flooded land. 

filed under Water on the new Canada page

Monday, February 26, 2018

California Court Ruling Ends Decades of State Pesticide Spraying

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California Court Ruling Ends Decades of State Pesticide Spraying (EcoWatch)

"The judge has told the state that harmful pesticides simply can't be sprayed indiscriminately, without robust consideration of impacts on people, animals and water," said Bill Allayaud, California director of government affairs for the Environmental Working Group. "The ruling also affirms that Californians have the right to know about pesticides being sprayed around them and the ability to challenge spraying that endangers public health and natural resources."

filed under Legislation/Regulatory/ USA

Thursday, February 8, 2018

Facility planned for GTH would burn chemically-soaked railway ties to produce electricity.

Neighbours concerned about possible environmental effects, says RM of Sherwood

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Facility planned for GTH would burn chemically-soaked railway ties to produce electricity. Neighbours concerned about possible environmental effects, says RM of Sherwood (CBC Investigates)

Creosote is a registered pesticide used in treating wood in Canada. It is toxic and cancer-causing. Proper disposal of treated wood is a huge can of worms around the world as we keep producing more and there is no safe way of re-using, recycling or disposing.

Any kind of smoke is already known to be cancer-causing. When it is laced with additional cancer-causing chemicals, it is even more unacceptable. and upwind from a center of population? even more unacceptable. I don't know if anyone has used the term incinerator for this project, but most recent incinerator projects have been vehemently opposed because of the pollution they cause.

filed under and more info under treated wood  

also see Creosote on wikipedia

Saturday, January 20, 2018

New German Government Would Ban Glyphosate Herbicides in Shock to Monsanto-Bayer Merger

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New German Government Would Ban Glyphosate Herbicides in Shock to Monsanto-Bayer Merger  (12 January 2018)

In a shock announcement Friday, Angela Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union of Germany (CDU) and the Social Democrats (SPD) have agreed on a blueprint for formal grand coalition negotiations, which includes a complete ban on glyphosate herbicides. Details of the suggested ban are yet to be announced.

filed under legislation/Europe

Saturday, January 20, 2018

The Organic Food and Farming Movement Calls for the Regulation of New Genetic Engineering Techniques as GMOs

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The Organic Food and Farming Movement Calls for the Regulation of New Genetic Engineering Techniques as GMOs

The current absence of regulation for these new technologies in many parts of the world means that genetically modified plants and animals can be released in the environment with no risk assessment and no information for breeders, farmers and consumers. The organic movement calls on regulators to ensure transparency and traceability, and to safeguard producers’ and consumers’ freedom not to use untested genetic engineering techniques.”

filed under gmos/general