• Learn to Manage Pests Naturally
  • SNAP Tour of Organic Vegetable Garden
  • Driving Near Recently Sprayed Fields Exposes People to Pesticides
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • Grow a Lush Garden Organically
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides
  • SNAP Display at Event
  • Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides

Antibacterials

more at http://www.snapinfo.ca/info/wildlife under aquatic communities and links between individual pesticides and cancer., children

G20 Health Ministers Craft Plan to Address Antimicrobial Resistance   (Beyond Pesticides, May 23, 2017) Health ministers from the G20 nations, the largest advanced and emerging economies, identified Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) as a “current and increasing threat and challenge to global health” and committed the member countries to several actions aimed at reducing the occurrence of AMR.

Levels of Triclosan Spike in Children Following Hand Washing or Tooth Brushing (Beyond Pesticides, June 2, 2017)  The researchers found triclosan in over 70% of samples taken. In the group of 8 year olds, they report that levels were 66% higher in the children that used hand soap. For those that wash their hands over five times a day, the levels increase more than four times in comparison to children who wash their hands once or less per day. For toothpaste, researchers find that children who had brushed their teeth and then been tested within 24 hours had concentrations of triclosan that were 167% higher than those who had not brushed their teeth in the last 24 hours. Meanwhile, EPA, which has jurisdiction over non-cosmetic consumer products containing triclosan (microban), continues to allow the use of this hazardous chemical in numerous plastic and textile products, from toys, cutting boards, hair brushes, sponges, computer keyboards to socks and undergarments.  SNAP comment: I believe triclosan and triclocarban have to be listed on labels. Perhaps the product only mentions antibacterials like the shoes I bought last year. I have not been able to find out which anti-bacterial was used. 

FDA toughens stand on antibacterial soap labelling  and FDA Finally Bans the Antibacterial Triclosan in Soaps, While EPA Allows Its Use in Common Household Products and Toys,'Antibacterial ingredients may do more harm than good over the long term,' says FDA medical doctor  (CBC News, Sep 02, 2016)This includes the registered pesticides triclosan and triclocarbanThe FDA statement said that data submitted by the companies about the 19 ingredients wasn't sufficient: "The rule does not affect hand sanitizers or wipes." "Meanwhile, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which has jurisdiction over household products containing triclosan (microban), continues to allow the use of this hazardous chemical in numerous plastic and textile products, from toys, cutting boards, hair brushes, sponges, computer keyboards to socks and undergarments." and it remains in toothpaste!    In the meantime in Canada, we propose a voluntary cut out by industry and "The government will continue to monitor new scientific evidence related to triclosan and will take further action if warranted," André Gagnon said.' This example illustrates how difficult it is to get any registered product off the market in spite of long-standing evidence of harm. 

NGOs support banning triclosan in Canada.  November 27, 2014  Environment and Health Groups' Statement on TriclosanSNAP signed on to the original statement and is also signing the letter of support because no action has yet been taken by the Canadian government. 

Groups’ Petition to Ban Harmful Antibacterial Pesticide Rejected by EPA (Beyond Pesticides, May 15, 2015) ­­­In a response that took over five years, yesterday the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its long-awaited response denying the request to cancel registered products that contain the antibacterial pesticide triclosan, often sold under the trade name microbanThe decision allows this toxic substance to continue to be sold nationwide in common household products, from toys, cutting boards, hair brushes, sponges, computer keyboards to socks and undergarments.The cosmetic uses of triclosan, such as toothpaste and liquid soaps, are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and subject to a separate petition for which there has been no response since its filing in 2005 and again in 2009.

Antibacterial Soap Exposes Health Workers to High Triclosan Levels (Beyond Pesticides, August 21, 2014)

FDA Questioned Triclosan’s Safety in Colgate’s Total Toothpaste in 90′s (Beyond Pesticides, August 19, 2014)

Colgate is the only US toothpaste to still contain triclosan...
FDA questioned safety.

Study Finds Individuals Exposed to Triclosan More Likely to Carry Staph Bacteria (Beyond Pesticides, April 21, 2014) Finding has troubling implications for public health.

Researchers Show Impaired Muscle Function from Antibacterial Chemical, Call on Regulators to Reconsider Consumer Uses (Beyond Pesticides, August 16, 2012) Triclosan hinders muscle contractions at a cellular level, slows swimming in fish, and reduces muscular strength in mice.

Triclosan video (Allison Aiello, PhD).2012 Beyond Pesticides Forum: Pesticides & Health Panel, pt. 4    Triclosan started out being regulated as a pesticide in the US. it is widespread in consumer products. At low levels present, it does not reduce bacteria on hands and evidence indicates users harbour more dangerous resistant bacteria. 

Johnson and Johnson to Phase Out Triclosan, Regulators Remain Unresponsive (Beyond Pesticides, August 17, 2012)

Study Documents Triclosan’s Failure To Kill Bacteria in Hospital Settings  (Beyond Pesticides, March 9, 2011) A recent study reports that the underlying cause of a fatal outbreak of P. aeruginosa in a hospital came from the contamination of triclosan soap dispensers, which acted as a continuous source of the bacterium. see the following action item:

From Yoga Mats to Toothpaste: Tell EPA to ban triclosan by April 8, 2011 Triclosan, found in many consumer products like yoga mats, cosmetics, kitchen utensils and toothpaste is now found in the bodies of 75% of the US population, is linked to hormone disruption, bacterial and antibiotic resistance, dioxin contamination, and contaminated fish and biosolids. Studies this past year show that triclosan can interfere with pregnancy hormones and possibly impact fetal development. This is critical since pregnant women have elevated levels of triclosan in their bodies. Triclosan is also an endocrine disruptor that interferes with the thyroid hormone. Triclosan contaminates our waters, food and accumulates in wildlife.(CANADA: Triclosan is contaminating many of the same consumer products in Canada. Banning it in the U.S. where most are made is one step in getting rid of it in Canada.)   

The scientific literature has extensively linked the uses of triclosan, and its cousin triclocarban, to many health and environmental hazards.

Canada 

Canada To Declare Triclosan Toxic to Environment (Beyond Pesticides, March 28, 2012) The draft risk assessment finds triclosan to be toxic to the environment but but does not find enough evidence to say it is hazardous to human health.(!) The formal proposal to list the chemical as toxic to the environment will be published Friday...A toxic designation under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act triggers a process to find ways to curtail a chemical’s use, including a possible ban in a range of personal-care products. 

Alternatives

Antibacterial Soap: Do You Need It to Keep Your Home Clean? Antibacterial cleaners don’t work any better than regular ones – and they damage the environment. By Matthew Hoffman, MD Several studies compared people who washed their hands with regular or antibacterial soap. In all but one trial, “there was no difference between groups, either in bacteria on the hands or in rates of illness.” In a single study, people who used antibacterial soap did have fewer bacteria on their hands, but only if they washed for 30 seconds, 18 times a day, for five days straight. Products used in hospital settings are up to10 times more concentrated. By definition, antibacterials kill bacteria, not the viruses responsible for most minor illnesses.