• SNAP Display at Event
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • Learn About Pesticides in Foods
  • LIving Near Fields Increases Pesticide Exposure
  • Grow a Lush Garden Organically
  • Driving Near Recently Sprayed Fields Exposes People to Pesticides
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Learn to Manage Pests Naturally

Diabetes/Obesity

Farmers’ Greater Risk of Diabetes Linked to Pesticide Exposure  (Beyond Pesticides, September, 2017) A recently released report, Gallup-Sharecare State of Well-Being: The Face of Diabetes in the United States, looks at high diabetes rates across various U.S. demographic groups, including those in farming. People working in the transportation sector registered the highest incidence of diagnosed diabetes at 10.6%. But those working as farmers and fishermen came in second, with 8.5% reporting a diagnosis of the disease.

Study Links Carbamate Insecticides to Diabetes and other Metabolic Diseases (Beyond Pesticides, January 25, 2017) A study conducted at the University of Buffalo recently revealed a connection between two common insecticides and an increased risk for certain metabolic diseases, including diabetes. Researchers found that by binding to and disrupting melatonin receptors that control numerous physiological functions, chemicals such as insecticides can affect melatonin levels, creating a higher risk for metabolic diseases to develop... The implicated chemicals in this research, carbaryl and carbofuran, are notoriously dangerous carbamate insecticides.SNAP Comment: Independent research once more finding health issues with pesticides. As of this writing, there are still 30 carbaryl insecticide products available in Canada and none with carbofuran. Canada's Cabofuran registration expired at the end of 2012. 

Chemical toxins: a hypothesis to explain the global obesity epidemic. (Apr 2002)  The number of obese people worldwide has escalated recently. There is more evidence to indicate that the body's natural weight-control mechanisms are not functioning properly in obesity. During the last few decades, there has been the exponential production and usage of synthetic organic and inorganic chemicals. Many of these chemicals are better known for causing weight loss at high levels of exposure but much lower concentrations of these same chemicals have powerful weight-promoting actions. This property has already been widely exploited commercially to produce growth hormones that fatten livestock and pharmaceuticals that induce weight gain in grossly underweight patients. This paper presents a hypothesis that the current level of human exposure to these chemicals may have damaged many of the body's natural weight-control mechanisms. Furthermore, it is posited that these effects play a significant role in the worldwide obesity epidemic.

Long-term Pesticide Exposure May Increase Risk of Diabetes   Seven pesticides were linked to increased type 2 diabetes:aldrin, chlordane, heptachlor, dichlorvos, trichlorfon, alachlor and cynazine, with a 250% (The strongest correlation) increased risk of diabetes for people who sprayed the pesticide Trichlorfon more than ten times!   Out of the 50 pesticides studied, the seven pesticides involved in increasing diabetes risk are all chlorinated compounds, including two herbicides, three organochlorine insecticides and two organophosphate pesticides. (Thanks to John  for the diabetes and pesticide material) 

Canada: As of October 2012, dichlorvos is still of concern as there are still 11 products registered including 1 domestic product (Ortho Home Defense Max No-Pest Insecticide Strip) and products registered for fogging. Vapona pest strips used to be common. Trichlorfon: Historically there were many products including cattle insecticide and granular bait..Trichlorfon: Historically there were many products including cattle insecticide and granular bait. Only 3 products are still registered withcommercial and restricted uses since 2008. Re-evaluation Decision  Trichlorfon

POPs lead to insulin resistance in rats. (Environmental Health Perspectives Jan 14, 2010) . Persistent organic pollutant exposure leads to insulin resistance syndrome.

Obesogens: Can common chemicals make us fat? (phthalates, endocrine disruption)