• SNAP Display at Event
  • Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Grow a Lush Garden Organically
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Driving Near Recently Sprayed Fields Exposes People to Pesticides
  • LIving Near Fields Increases Pesticide Exposure
  • Learn About Pesticides in Foods
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides

Archives for 2021

Sunday, April 25, 2021

No Pollinator is Safe — New Evidence of Neonicotinoids Harming Wild, Ground Nesting Bees

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“No Pollinator is Safe” — New Evidence of Neonicotinoids Harming Wild, Ground Nesting Bees

(Beyond Pesticides, April 13, 2021) A new study is making it increasingly clear that current laws are not protecting wild, ground nesting bees from the hazards of neonicotinoid insecticides.... Blue Orchard Mason Bees (Osima spp) are at particular risk from pesticide-contaminated soil they use to create their nest. 

filed under wildlife/insects and neonicotinoids

Sunday, April 25, 2021

Invertebrates and Plants Face Increasing Threat from Pesticide Use, Despite Declining Chemical Use Patterns

pyrethroids, neonicotinoids, organophosphates, glyphosate

Invertebrates and Plants Face Increasing Threat from Pesticide Use, Despite Declining Chemical Use Patterns

Pesticide use threatens aquatic and terrestrial invertebrates and plants more than ever, despite declining chemical use and implementation of genetically engineered (GE) crops in the U.S., according to a University Koblenz-Landau, Germany study.' Although the new generation of pesticides (e.g., neonicotinoids, pyrethroids) pesticides are more target-specific, requiring lower chemical concentrations for effectiveness, they have over double the toxic effects on invertebrates, like pollinators....'The study results find a decrease in total pesticide amounts by volume on U.S. farms by 40 percent over the last 25 years. Although bird and mammal toxicity decreases with a reduction in pesticide use (95 percent), invertebrates experience higher toxicity levels. Pyrethroid insecticides cause toxicity to double among aquatic invertebrates. Neonicotinoid insecticides present double the risk to terrestrial invertebrates. Overall, pesticide toxicity for terrestrial plants is highest regardless of whether fields are conventional, non-GE, or GE

filed under wildlife

Sunday, April 25, 2021

Toxic Pesticides Are Polluting Over Half of Arable Land, Reinforcing Need for Global Organic Transition

world study

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Toxic Pesticides Are Polluting Over Half of Arable Land, Reinforcing Need for Global Organic Transition

(Beyond Pesticides, April 7, 2021) 'Toxic pesticides are putting more than half of the Earth’s farmland at risk of pesticide pollution that contaminates water, harms biodiversity, and ultimately undermines food security, according to research published in Nature Geosciences last month.   A pesticide was deemed to put a location at risk if the predicted environmental concentration of the pesticide was expected to be above the no-effect concentration for ecotoxicological harm. The high risk designation was noted when expected environmental concentrations were more than three orders of magnitude (1,000x) higher than the no-effect concentration.     Scientists determined that 75% of global agricultural land was at risk, with 31% at high risk. Considering the additive effects of pesticide use, researchers found that 64% of ag land was at risk from more than one of the 92 pesticide active ingredients evaluated. Shockingly, 21% of farmland is at risk by more than 10 pesticides.'

filed under Pesticides in Soils

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Hazardous Pesticide Breakdown Chemicals Found in Streams Nationwide, Raising Health Concerns

US study

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Hazardous Pesticide Breakdown Chemicals Found in Streams Nationwide, Raising Health Concerns     (Beyond Pesticides, March 31, 2021) Pesticide breakdown products are just as ubiquitous as their parent compounds in urban streams throughout the United States, according to research conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and published in Environmental Science and Technology.   Herbicide metabolites were detected more frequently than insecticides and fungicides, but one problematic insecticide metabolite alone, fipronil sulfone (breakdown of the active ingredient fipronil), has the potential to significantly increase the toxicity of a steam to aquatic organisms. With fipronil sulfone detected in 20% of sampled streams – more frequently than its parent compound—there are significant implications for the health of U.S. waterways.   SNAP Comment: A PMRA label search found 0 fipronil products registered in Canada.

filed under water

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Living Within 2.5 Miles of Chemical Farming Increases Risk of Childhood Brain Tumors

California study

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Living Within 2.5 Miles of Chemical Farming Increases Risk of Childhood Brain Tumors

(Beyond Pesticides, April 6, 2021) Pregnant women living within 2.5 miles of agricultural pesticide applications have an increased risk that their child will develop central nervous system (CNS) tumors, according to a study published in the journal Environmental Research by a team at University of California, Los Angeles. The results are particularly concerning as it reveals that individuals do not have to be in close contact with pesticides for risky, health-harming exposures to occur.    For astrocytoma tumors, the use of the pesticides bromacil, thiophanate-methyltriforine, and kresoxim-methyl increased risk of tumor development. Medulloblastoma was associated with the use of chlorothalonilpropiconazoledimethoate, and linuron. Development of ependymoma was linked to nearby use of thiophanate-methyl. In sum, the pesticides chlorthalonil, bromacil, thiophanate-methyl, triforine, kresoxim-methyl, propiconazole, dimethoate, and linuron were all linked to elevated rates of a CNS tumor.

SNAP Comment: California is one of the only locations where such a study can be performed because they keep pesticide use data. In Saskatchewan, we don't even have pesticide sales data since 2003! The transition from farmland to residential is equally abrupt in SK.  As of 20 April 2021, the number of registered products of the pesticides quoted above are registered by the PMRA: Linuron 4 (herbicide) (annual weeds in crops); bromacil, 6 (herbicide); thiophanate-methyl,(fungicide) 13. included uses for seed potatoes ((not an extensive search of uses); Triforine,2 (fungicide) for blueberries, other berries and fruit);  kresoxim-methyl 2 (fungicide) for pear scab and powdery mildew; chlorothalonil,38 labels (fungicide) formarket gardens, corn and fruit, golf courses, ornamentals and aerial applications (not an extensive search of uses); propiconazole,65 labels (fungicide) turf, golf courses. Christmas tree plantations, crops, market gardens (not an extensive search of uses); dimethoate (Cygon) 6 labels (systemic insecticide) flowers, vegetables, field crops, ornamental trees (not an extensive search of uses)

filed under children, hazads of living near fields, and cancer /links between individual chemicals....

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Roundup Shown to Kill Bees—But Not How You Might Expect

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Roundup Shown to Kill Bees—But Not How You Might Expect

(Beyond Pesticides, April 20, 2021) 'Roundup products manufactured by Bayer-Monsanto kill exposed bumblebees at high rates, according to a new study published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, which points to undisclosed inert ingredients (those that typically make up a majority of the product formulation) as the primary culprit.

Bumblebees sprayed with consumer use Roundup Ready-To-Use (contains glyphosate) experienced a shocking 94% mortality. Subsequent experiments were conducted at lower application rates for that product, and significant mortality was seen for the 1:1 dilution (98% mortality) as well as the 1:3 dilution rate (78% mortality). The agricultural use Roundup Proactive (contains glyphosate) saw lower rates of death at 30%. Weedol, a glyphosate-based consumer product, displayed a mortality rate (6%) similar to the unexposed control group of bumblebees (4%). However, Roundup Speed Ultra' (containing acetic acid and no glyphosate) 'was found to kill 96% of exposed pollinators.'.

SNAP Comment: Interesting that the UK formulation containing acetic acid andno glyphosate was so toxic as this is considered an alternative product.

filed under inerts/formulants and wildlife/insects

Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Pesticides Are More Widespread in Both Conventional and Organic Agricultural Soils than Previously Thought

Swiss study

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Pesticides Are More Widespread in Both Conventional and Organic Agricultural Soils than Previously Thought

(Beyond Pesticides, April 1, 2021) 'A legacy of toxic pesticide use in agriculture is showing up as residues on organic farms, emphasizing the threat of a history of weak regulatory standards that has left farmland poisoned and the urgent need to transition to organic. A study, published in Environmental Science & Technology, documents the findings of pesticide residues on organic farmland and shows a decrease in residues after transition, with lingering effects for decades.' Researchers studied residues of 46 current pesticides. Conventional soils had 9 times higher pesticide contamination and the longer land was organic, the lower the residue. These pesticide residues affect soil organisms and consequently soil processes and functions. More studies are needed. 

filed under pesticides in soils

Monday, April 19, 2021

Stop the Spray groups in Canada working to ban glyphosate in forestry

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Stop the Spray Canada Facebood group _ members only

Stop the Spray Alberta Facebood group _ members only

Stop the Spray BC Facebood group _ members only

Stop Spraying in New Brunswick  Facebood group _ members only

Stop Spraying and Clear-Cutting Nova Scotia (SSACCNS) Facebood group _ members only

Stop the Spray Ontario Facebood group _ members only  They have a petition to sign “Ontario Legislative Assembly: Stop the use of non-essential chemical herbicides in Ontario's public forests ...”. 

From what I gather, Quebec and Saskatchewan do not currently allow forestry companies leasing provincial Crown land to spray herbicides on the forest. 

Other uses of pesticides in Canadian forests

  • In addition to forest companies, many provincial department of highways spray road edges to maintain visibility, railroads spray rail beds for weeds, and power companies spray under power lines. If you become aware of other uses, let SNAP know. 
  • Tree seedlings planted by tree planters also generally seem to be treated, likely with fungicide or insecticides as many tree planters reported to me. I needmore details about this use. 
  • At lest Saskatchewan sprays when needed for insects such as Spruce Budworm and Tent Caterpillars. Btk is an acceptable natural insecticide for organic agriculture and is effective for both. It has generally replaced much more toxic insecticides such as DDT and fenitrothion. Each province would have different rules about this. 

filed under forestry/Canada

Monday, April 19, 2021

City of Regina Pests and Wildlife page

What the city does and what you can do

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City of Regina Pests and Wildlife page

Learn about invasive pests and how to keep them under control without compromising the health of our ecosystems. Learn what the city does and what you can do for many issues. 

Regina does not have a pesticide bylaw but these efforts are a step in the right direction.

filed under Alternatives

Friday, April 16, 2021

Over 100 Chemicals Detectable in Pregnant Women, Including 98 “New” or Unknown Compounds

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Over 100 Chemicals Detectable in Pregnant Women, Including 98 “New” or Unknown Compounds

(Beyond Pesticides, March 25, 2021) 'A new University of California San Francisco (UCSF) study, published in Environmental Science & Technology, finds over 100 chemicals present in U.S. pregnant women’s blood and umbilical cord samples. This discovery ignites concerns over prenatal exposure to chemicals from consumer and industrial products and sources. Furthermore, 89 percent of these chemical contaminants are unknown sources and uses, lacking adequate information, or are not previously detectable in humans. This discovery ignites concerns over prenatal exposure to chemicals from consumer and industrial products and sources.

The study detects 109 chemicals within blood samples of mothers and newborns, including pesticides, plasticizers, compounds in cosmetics and consumer products, pharmaceuticals, flame retardants, and per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) compounds. Of the 109 chemicals, 55 lack preceding reports on their presence in humans, and 42 chemical compounds have little to no information regarding chemical classification, use, and source of contamination.'

filed under children

Friday, April 16, 2021

Hazardous Pesticide Breakdown Chemicals Found in Streams Nationwide, Raising Health Concerns

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Hazardous Pesticide Breakdown Chemicals Found in Streams Nationwide, Raising Health Concerns

(Beyond Pesticides, March 31, 2021) Pesticide breakdown products are just as ubiquitous as their parent compounds in urban streams throughout the United States, according to research conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and published in Environmental Science and Technology.   Herbicide metabolites were detected more frequently than insecticides and fungicides, but one problematic insecticide metabolite alone, fipronil sulfone (breakdown of the active ingredient fipronil), has the potential to significantly increase the toxicity of a steam to aquatic organisms. With fipronil sulfone detected in 20% of sampled streams – more frequently than its parent compound—there are significant implications for the health of U.S. waterways.

SNAP Comment: A PMRA label search found 0 fipronil products registered in Canada.

filed under water

Friday, April 16, 2021

Kenyan Farmers Are Resorting to Hand Pollination After Pesticide Use Kills Off Local Pollinators

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Kenyan Farmers Are Resorting to Hand Pollination After Pesticide Use Kills Off Local Pollinators

(Beyond Pesticides, March 24, 2021) "The worst predictions of scientists and advocates are playing out in the fields of eastern Kenya, as chemical-intensive farming there threatens the future of food production. 

Crop yields in the region have tapered off over the last two years, and farmers like Mr. Mbithi are pointing to pesticide use as the cause, citing past reliance on the herbicide Roundup (glyphosate) and the organophosphate insecticide malathion. “Pollinators such as bees and butterflies are not around due to chemicals which we spray in our farms,” he told RFI."  

filed under Bee Die-Off

Friday, April 16, 2021

Endangered Florida Manatees Contaminated with Glyphosate/Roundup Due to Widespread Use

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Endangered Florida Manatees Contaminated with Glyphosate/Roundup Due to Widespread Use

(Beyond Pesticides, March 30, 2021) Florida manatees are experiencing chronic glyphosate exposure that is likely to impact their immune system and make them more susceptible to other environmental stressors such as red tide and cold stress... Results found glyphosate in the bodies of 55.8% of Florida manatee samples. Most concerning, the amount of pesticide increased in a straight line over the course of the study.  Authors of the study indicate that it is appropriate to consider glyphosate a “pseudo-persistent” pollutant, “in which new applications of the herbicide replace the molecules that are being removed,” the study reads.'

filed under wildlife/mammals

Thursday, April 15, 2021

Advancing consideration of endocrine-disrupting chemicals under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

Committee report – July 18-19 2018

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Advancing consideration of endocrine-disrupting chemicals under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999

Chemicals Management Plan Science Committee. Committee report – July 18-19 2018

filed under Legislation/Canada

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Researchers Find Nontoxic Method Kills a Problematic Fungus When It Least Expects It

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Researchers Find Nontoxic Method Kills a Problematic Fungus When It Least Expects It

(Beyond Pesticides, March 17, 2021) Ultraviolet radiation (UV-C) applied at night can successfully kill powdery mildew in farm fields, providing a potential route to significantly reduce the use of toxic fungicides, new research published in the journal Plant Disease finds. “UV treatments applied once or twice weekly were as effective as the best available fungicides applied on similar schedules for control of strawberry powdery mildew,"

filed under Alternatives/Diseases

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Arkansas Plant Board Takes First Step to Roll Back Crop Damage Protections from Dicamba/Herbicide Drift

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Arkansas Plant Board Takes First Step to Roll Back Crop Damage Protections from Dicamba/Herbicide Drift    (Beyond Pesticides, March 23, 2021) 'Earlier this month, the Arkansas State Plant Board (ASPB) voted to loosen regulations curtailing use of the highly drift-prone herbicide dicamba. With an 8-7 vote, ASPB eliminated measures advanced in 2016 that protect growers from dicamba drifting off of genetically engineered (GE) soybean fields.'

filed under Legislation/regulatory/USA

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Pesticide Exposure, Agricultural Work Associated with Chronic Lung Disease

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Pesticide Exposure, Agricultural Work Associated with Chronic Lung Disease

(Beyond Pesticides, March, 16, 2021) Occupational and environmental exposure to pesticides and other contaminants in the environment increase the risk of developing a lung condition known as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), according to a meta-analysis published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports. IPF is a chronic, degenerative disease with no certain cause or cure. It is estimated to affect roughly 13 women and 20 men in 100,000 adults worldwide annually, with onset averaging age 66.   Pesticide use and agricultural work were found to have the strongest association with IPF. Pesticide exposure increased risk of IPF by 107%, whereas agricultural workers recorded an 88% increased risk.

filed under respiratory

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Common Use Organophosphate Insecticides Pose a Greater Threat to Women’s Health

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Common Use Organophosphate Insecticides Pose a Greater Threat to Women’s Health

(Beyond Pesticides, March 18, 2021) A new study published in Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology finds chronic (long-term) organophosphate (OP) pesticide exposure increases adverse health and cancer risk for U.S.women relative to men.   Study results demonstrate that non-smoking women with higher concentrations of OP metabolites are at greater risk of developing cardiovascular disease, bronchitis, asthma, and total cancer, including breast cancer. OP exposure contributes most significantly to cardiovascular disease risk in women 60 to 85 years old. Increasing prescription drug use to treat pulmonary issues among women with higher OP concentrations indicates a relationship between exposure and health issues. Although breast cancer risk is highest among women overall, female smokers have a significantly higher risk of developing breast cancer in combination with OP exposure. Lastly, OP exposure among male smokers can increase rates of prostate cancer.

filed under Fact Sheets/Organophosphates and cancer/links

Tuesday, March 30, 2021

Glyphosate Profile

PROBABLE CARCINOGEN (IARC 2A)

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Glyphosate Profile (Carex Canada) CAREX Canada   PESTICIDES – PROBABLE CARCINOGEN (IARC 2A)

(CARcinogen EXposure) is a multi-institution team of researchers and specialists with expertise in epidemiology, risk assessment, toxicology, geographic information systems, and knowledge mobilization. The purpose of CAREX Canada is to provide a body of knowledge about Canadians’ exposures to known and suspected carcinogens, in order to support organizations in prioritizing exposures and in developing targeted exposure reduction policies and programs.

filed under glyphosate and cancer 

Sunday, March 28, 2021

Economic Impact of Glyphosate Contamination on Organic Production in Saskatchewan

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Economic Impact of Glyphosate Contamination on Organic Production in Saskatchewan (COTA Organic summit, November 18. 2019)

  1. 26% producers had an unintended contact with glyphosate incident on their farm
  2. 46% of respondents had to take land out of production
  3. 20% of respondents lost a sale
  4. 52% of respondents reported a financial loss
  5. 20 % of exporters had loads rejected by buyer that had passed glyphosate residue testing before it left Saskatchewan.

filed under 

Wednesday, March 24, 2021

Minnesota Deer Threatened by Ubiquitous Neonicotinoid Contamination, According to Study

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Minnesota Deer Threatened by Ubiquitous Neonicotinoid Contamination, According to Study  (Beyond Pesticides, March 10, 2021)  

'Preliminary results reveal that 61% of deer spleen samples contained neonicotinoids. Although MDNR notes that these levels are below allowable levels set by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for consumption of other foods like fruit and beef, it has not yet released exact numbers, and that fact alone does not equate to safety.

Subsequent reporting from the Minneapolis Star Tribune indicates that some of the deer spleens tested contained detections well above levels found in the South Dakota study that result in fawn birth defects (.33 parts per billion). A letter written to hunters who provided MDNR spleen samples informed them that initial testing found levels as high as 6.1 parts per billion.

The detections were not simply from one particular location, but widespread throughout the state, even in remote, forested areas.    These data reinforce long-standing calls by scientists and conservation groups to eliminate the use of neonicotinoids due to their broad ranging impacts on ecosystems. In 2018, the Task Force on Systemic Pesticides, an international group of over 240 scientists published a Worldwide Integrated Assessment (WIA) synthesizing 1,121 published peer-reviewed studies over the last five years. The scientists found that, “neonics impact all species that chew a plant, sip its sap, drink its nectar, eat its pollen or fruit and these impacts cascade through an ecosystem weakening its stability.”

filed under wiildlfe/mammals and neonicotinoids

Wednesday, March 24, 2021

EPA Proposes Cancellation of Highly Toxic Wood Preservative Pentachlorophenol (“Penta”)

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EPA Proposes Cancellation of Highly Toxic Wood Preservative Pentachlorophenol (“Penta”)

(Beyond Pesticides, March 9, 2021)   Last week, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced an interim decision to cancel of one of the most hazardous pesticides still used in the United States, pentachlorophenol (penta). Although long overdue, health advocates are hailing the agency’s action, taken due to significant risks to human health, the availability of alternatives, and the uncertain future of penta production. ...Although most uses of penta were eliminated in the 1980s, its application as a wood preservative remained.

Beyond Pesticides has extensive documentation on the history of penta production and regulation.linked to in this article.

SNAP Comment: As of 23 March 2021, there are still 2 commercial pentachlorophol products registered din Canada. SaskPower is still widely using penta-treated power poles and I suspect that penta is the product they use to retreat the poles to ensure a longer life. See Publications May 7, 2017 for Sask Power use and SNAP letter.

filed under Treated wood

Wednesday, March 24, 2021

Ecosystem Health: Pesticide Use from Forest Management Practices Threatens Essential West Coast Marine Organisms

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Ecosystem Health: Pesticide Use from Forest Management Practices Threatens Essential West Coast Marine Organisms

(Beyond Pesticides, March 11, 2021) A Portland State University (PSU) study finds that pesticides from the forestry industry threaten clams, mussels, oysters (bivalves) along the Oregon state coast. Bivalves are excellent indicator species, signaling environmental contamination through their sedimentary, filter-feeding diet. However, continuous pesticide inputs—from various forestry management regimes—into watersheds along Oregon’s coastal zone endanger these species in downstream rivers and estuaries (river mouths).... there is a lack of studies addressing the overall impact of multiple chemical mixtures and application on watersheds and subsequent aquatic transport. 

The study results detect 12 different chemical compounds (two herbicides, three fungicides, and seven insecticides) in both water and bivalve samples—five of which are current-use pesticides in forest management. Although pesticide concentration and type vary by season, organism, and watershed location, 38 percent of bivalve samples harbor pesticide concentrations high enough to accumulate in tissuesIndaziflam (a current-use herbicide in Oregon forestry) is present in seven percent of bivalve samples. Furthermore, water samples find current-use herbicides hexazinone and atrazine, and banned pesticides like DDT/DDE contribute to aquatic contamination downstream. The study uncovers that most contamination occurs along the Central Oregon Coast in the Siuslaw and Smith watersheds

Additionally, coastal and offshore aquaculture (farming of aquatic organisms) presents a new, looming threat to marine health. Namely, the use of antibiotics and pesticides on local marine ecosystems (e.g., insecticides to control sea lice in farmed salmon) results in coastal habitat loss and genetic and health risks to wild marine populations.

SNAP Comment: As of 23 March 2021, 7 Indaziflam products are registered in Canada, most for orchards and one for non residential/non-crop areas which includes railroads and utilities but not specifically forestry. 5 Hexazinone products with 3 used for alfalfa and blueberries, and 2 for woodland management and Christmas tree plantations, and 12 Atrazine labels which seem to be for use mostly in corn and agriculture. I suspect that extensive water testing in Canada would indicate the presence of many pesticides that likely could accumulate in bivalves and other aquatic organisms. If these particular products were found, the source would likely be agricultural and not forestry. 

filed under Wildlife/ aquatic organisms and forestry

Wednesday, March 24, 2021

Despite 1,700 Dog and Cat Deaths from Flea Collars, EPA Silent; Children at Risk

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Despite 1,700 Dog and Cat Deaths from Flea Collars, EPA Silent; Children at Risk

(Beyond Pesticides, March 5, 2021) Pet owners will be alarmed to read the report, by USA Today, that a popular flea and tick collar — Seresto, developed by Bayer and sold by Elanco — has been linked to nearly 1,700 pet deaths, injuries to tens of thousands of animals, and harm to hundreds of people... Beyond Pesticides and other advocates have warned of the toxicity of pet pesticide treatments, not only to the animals themselves, but also, to children and other household members. There are nontoxic ways to protect pets from fleas and other pests, and to protect human family members at the same time.

The active pesticide ingredients in the Seresto pet collars are imidacloprid and flumethrin. The neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid is a commonly used pesticide associated with serious health and environmental decline. ... Flumethrin is a chemical in the pyrethroid class of synthetic neurotoxic insecticides, which have been repeatedly linked to neurological issues, such as seizures and learning disabilities in children, and to gastrointestinal distress, as well as to damage to non-target invertebrates, according to EPA’s own analysis.'

SNAP Comment: There are 99 imidacloprid products registered in Canada as of 23 March 2021, many of them registered for pet treatments. Flumethrin is not and has not bee registered in Canada. The Seresto trademark is not registered in Canada.

Filed under pets, neonicotinoids and pyrethrins

Sunday, March 21, 2021

No more excuses: Global network demands phase-out of Highly Hazardous Pesticides by 2030

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No more excuses: Global network demands phase-out of Highly Hazardous Pesticides by 2030 (PAN, March 19, 2021)

Includes links to the PAN International Consolidated List of Banned Pesticides and PAN International List of Highly Hazardous Pesticides (PAN List of HHPs) (March 2021)

PAN’s Bans List shows that 162 countries have banned a total of 460 pesticide active ingredients or groups of actives regarded as still ‘currently in use’ in the global market, i.e. not obsolete. In total, there were 94 active ingredients that were newly added to the list of banned pesticides. This includes the world’s most popular weedkiller, glyphosate. The list also shows that for the first time, imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiamethoxam – neonicotinoids linked to bee deaths – have all lost approval in the European Union (EU).

 filed under Pesticide Safety

Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Glyphosate: Its Environmental Persistence and Impact on Crop Health and Nutrition

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Glyphosate: Its Environmental Persistence and Impact on Crop Health and Nutrition   (Ramdas Kanissery et al, Plants (Basel). 2019 Nov; 8(11): 499).

'The purpose of this brief review is to present and discuss the state of knowledge with respect to its persistence in the environment, possible effects on crop health, and impacts on crop nutrition.'

filded under Food/Nutrition

Tuesday, March 16, 2021

Let s talk about herbicide residues in forest communities: what are they doing?

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 Let’s talk about herbicide residues in forest communities: what are they doing?(Dr. Lisa Wood, UNBC - November 13 2020) 1 hour and 16 minutes video presentation. Several charts indicating that  glyphosate and its breakdown products AMPA persist much longer in the "real world" scenario,.When plants such as raspberries and Blueberries are not kiilled outright by glyphosate, they accumulate glyphosate and AMPA intheir tissues and fruits. The first year after spraying, over 70% of samples contained glyphosate and AMPA.. It took 6 years for new raspberry samples contained no herbicide. 

filed under forestry/ herbicides

Stop the Spray Canada Facebook group

Monday, March 15, 2021

Solitary Wild Bees Harmed by Neonicotinoid Pesticides Applied by Soil Drenching

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Solitary Wild Bees Harmed by Neonicotinoid Pesticides Applied by Soil Drenching

(Beyond Pesticides, March 2, 2021) 'Populations of solitary ground nesting bees decline after exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides, according to a study published in Scientific Reports late last month. In addition to ground-nesting bees, neonicotinoids have been shown to harm butterflies, hummingbirds, songbirds, aquatic species and mammals, including human,.. Squash seeds were treated with the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam, the neonicotinoid imidacloprid was applied as a soil drench, and chlorantraniliprole was sprayed on plant foliage. A fourth group of hoop houses did not have a pesticide applied in order to act as a control.

Results show that the soil drench (imidacloprid) presents significant hazards to ground nesting bees. Hoary squash bees in this group initiated 85% fewer nests, harvested 5 times less pollen, and produced 89% fewer offspring than the untreated control group... Whatever the etiology of the deleterious effects observed, study authors are certain that their data points to unacceptable hazards from the use of imidacloprid.' 

filed under wildlife/insects and neonicotinoids

Monday, March 15, 2021

Implications for Human Health: Glyphosate-Related Soil Erosion Re-Releases Toxic Pesticides from Soil

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Implications for Human Health: Glyphosate-Related Soil Erosion Re-Releases Toxic Pesticides from Soil

French West Indies study. (Beyond Pesticides, March 4, 2021) A new study finds glyphosate use stimulates soil erosion responsible for releasing banned, toxic pesticide chlordecone (Kepone), which was used in banana production. ... Researchers note, “Chlordecone fluxes drastically increased when glyphosate use began, leading to widespread ecosystem contamination. As glyphosate is used globally, ecotoxicological risk management strategies should consider how its application affects persistent pesticide storage in soils, transfer dynamics, and widespread contamination.” Conventional pesticide use contaminates soil and their respective Critical Zone (CZ) compartments.

SNAP Comment: I wonder how many other chemicals it might release through erosion... However, there was a lot more soil drifting in SK before chem fallowing with Roundup.

filed under glyphosate, water and soils

Monday, March 15, 2021

Update on the Neonicotinoid Pesticides

(Government of Canada, 30 September 2020)

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Update on the Neonicotinoid Pesticides (Government of Canada, 30 September 2020)

filed under Legislation/Regulatory/Canada

Monday, March 15, 2021

Massachusetts Regulators Restrict Consumer Use of Bee-Toxic Neonicotinoid Pesticides

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Massachusetts Regulators Restrict Consumer Use of Bee-Toxic Neonicotinoid Pesticides

(Beyond Pesticides, March 3, 2021) Earlier this week, pesticide regulators in the commonwealth of Massachusetts voted to restrict outdoor consumer uses of neonicotinoid insecticides. The move is the result of sustained advocacy from broad coalition of individuals and organizations focused on protecting pollinators and ecosystem health. 

SNAP Comment:  This law does not restrict use in pet products and nursery plants or commercial products used by pest control applicators if used indoors or for health reasons.As of 15 March 2021, there are 63 PMRA imidacloprid  and 3 dinotefuran (mostly for tiick and fleas on pets) 1 acetamiprid, and 1 Thiamethoxam (antgel).registered as insecticides consumer (domestic) products, Although I haven't checked the commercial products, there are likely some that can be used by pest control applicators.. 

filed under Bylaws/USA

Monday, March 15, 2021

Chemical control in forest pest management

a Canadian history

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Chemical control in forest pest management  (Stephen B. Holmes and Chris J.K. MacQuarrie, Cambridge University Press:  25 January 2016)

a history.from Roman and Chinese times to modern. In Canada it starts with DDT in Algonquin Park, Ontario, in 1944-45 and goes throuhg a slough of products including some that were never registered.like Mexacarbate used in Quebec and Ontario (1972-75) to pyrethrins and fenitrothion (until 1998). Then tebufenozide, an insect moulting hormone analogue, temporarily registerd in 1996 for moths and butterflies, like Spruce Budworm. The neonicotinoid imidacloprid is also used in forestry. For control pine bark beetle, the arsenic based herbicide MSMA has also been used on selective trees after bringing the beetles in with a pheromone attractant. Environmental effects of the various insecticides are also mentioned. The article also discusses botanical based insecticides like azadirachtin and spinosyns. The article also discussesaerial application.

filed under forestry

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Eliminating Pesticides Increases Crop Yields, Debunking Myth of Pesticide Benefits

soil fungi eliminate nematodes

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Eliminating Pesticides Increases Crop Yields, Debunking Myth of Pesticide Benefits

(Beyond Pesticides, February 12, 2021) Recent research points to an example of such ecosystem efficacy. The study, by researchers in California and China, sought to evaluate whether increased population densities of fungi might be suppressing nematode populations in California production fields frequently planted with the cole crops (such as brussels sprouts and broccoli) they favor. The research finds that a diverse population of fungi in soils is highly likely to be effectively killing nematodes that threaten such crops

These research results demonstrate how faulty the use of fungicides — which in 2012 amounted to 105 million pounds in the U.S — is likely to be. These compounds destroy fungi that provide a variety of beneficial and economically valuable ecosystem (and crop) services. Fungi decompose and recycle nutrients, improve moisture retention, and even act as biological controls for some fungal diseases. Many other pesticides, including glyphosate (which is an antibiotic) threaten microbial life, as well.

filed under Alternatives/insects and invertebrates

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Glyphosate and Other Weed Killers Create Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Agricultural Soils

as well as glufosinate and dicamba

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Glyphosate and Other Weed Killers Create Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Agricultural Soils

(Beyond Pesticides, February 24, 2021) 'Soil sprayed with weedkillers glyphosate, glufosinate, or dicamba are likely to contain higher amounts of antibiotic resistant bacteria, according to research published earlier this month in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. Each year in the United States, at least 2 million people develop an antibiotic resistant infection, and over 23,000 die. Authors of the study say widespread herbicide use is likely playing a role. “Our results suggest that the use of herbicides could indirectly drive antibiotic resistance evolution in agricultural soil microbiomes, which are repeatedly exposed to herbicides during weed control,” said Ville Friman, PhD of the University of York in the United Kingdom.

Contrary to the pesticide industry’s claim that these chemicals break down quickly and become inert by binding to soil particles, large proportions of the herbicides remained in the soil at the end of the 60-day experiment, stemming back from the first application. For glyphosate 18% remained, glufosinate 21%, and dicamba 34%.

... scientists determined that herbicide exposure triggers evolutionary pressures on bacteria similar to those exposed to antibiotics.

“Interestingly, antibiotic resistance genes were favoured at herbicide concentrations that were not lethal to bacteria,” said Dr. Friman. “This shows that already very low levels of herbicides could significantly change the genetic composition of soil bacterial populations. Such effects are currently missed by ecotoxicological risk assessments, which do not consider evolutionary consequences of prolonged chemical application at the level of microbial communities.”'

The field 'Samples matched up closely to the results of the microcosm experiment:'

filed under glyphosate, dicamba and Health/Antibiotic Resistance

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Implications for Human Health: Chronic Inhalation of Paraquat in Low-Doses Disrupts Sense of Smell

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Implications for Human Health: Chronic Inhalation of Paraquat in Low-Doses Disrupts Sense of Smell

SNAP Comment: As of 9 March 3021, the PMRA still lists 3  paraquat labels as being registered in Canada. The commercial product is Gramoxone 200 SL

(Beyond Pesticides, February 18, 2021) 'New research published in the journal Toxicological Sciences finds extended inhalation of the common herbicide paraquat causes male mice to lose some sense of smell, even at low doses. This study highlights the significance of understanding how specific chemical exposure routes can influence disease development. Olfactory (relating to the sense of smell) impairment is a precursory feature of Parkinson’s disease (PD), and studies connect paraquat poisoning to PD risk.'

filed under Health/Nervous System Effects/ Parkinson Disease, Low Dose Effects and Loss of Smell

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

New Mexico Bill Will Protect Children from Toxic Pesticides Where They Learn and Play

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New Mexico Bill Will Protect Children from Toxic Pesticides Where They Learn and Play

(Santa Fe, New Mexico, February 11, 2021)—New Mexico State Senator Brenda McKenna  introduced the Public Schools Pesticide Management Act (PSPMA) (SB 326) in order to protect school children from exposure to toxic pesticides where they learn and play. The legislation advances ecological pest management, an environmentally healthy way to protect children and the public from weeds and pests, within all schools, classrooms, community parks, and playgrounds in the state.

Under PSPMA, only organic and minimum risk pesticides, the least toxic, yet still-effective products on the market will be allowed. Toxic pesticide use will be permitted only under a defined public health emergency, as determined by a public health official.

filed under bylaws

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Hummingbirds Harmed by Pesticides Killing Off Bees, Butterflies, and Other Pollinators

effects of neonicotinoid imidacloprid

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Hummingbirds Harmed by Pesticides Killing Off Bees, Butterflies, and Other Pollinators

(Beyond Pesticides, February 23, 2021)  'Well known for their nectar-fueled hovering flight powered by wings beating over 50 times per second, hummingbirds display unique reactions to toxic pesticides. Research by scientists at the University of Toronto finds that hummingbirds exposed to systemic neonicotinoid insecticides for even a short period of time can disrupt the high-powered metabolism of this important and charismatic animal.

Given their high energy demands and with such razor thin margins for error, neonicotinoids may significantly damage hummingbird’s fitness in the wild.' 

filed under wildlife/birds and neonicotinoids

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

In Cahoots with Pesticide Industry, Former U.S. Officials Try to Stop Mexico from Banning Glyphosate, But Fail

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In Cahoots with Pesticide Industry, Former U.S. Officials Try to Stop Mexico from Banning Glyphosate, But Fail

(Beyond Pesticides, February 17, 2021) New details are emerging around the pressure campaign Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador and his administration withstood as the country moved towards banning Bayer/Monsanto’s glyphosate (Roundup) herbicide. According to documents obtained by a Freedom of Information Act request and published in the Guardian, U.S. Trade Representative, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) worked in coordination with Bayer/Monsanto and the agrichemical industry umbrella group Croplife America to stop the Mexican government from embracing a precautionary approach to pesticide regulation. While the Trump administration and its collaborators were successful in a similar campaign against Thailand, there are no indications that Mexico will rescind its final decision to ban glyphosate, made at the end of last year. 

filed under Industry Shenanigans/Regulatory and legal and glyphosate

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Aggressive Cancer in Sea Lions Linked to Legacy Pesticides and Herpesvirus Precursor, Implications for Human Health

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Aggressive Cancer in Sea Lions Linked to Ocean Pollution and Herpesvirus Precursor, Implications for Human Health

(Beyond Pesticides, February 11, 2021) California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are experiencing high rates of urogenital carcinoma (UGC) cancer incidences from the combined effect of toxic “legacy” pesticides like DDT and the viral infection Otarine herpesvirus-1 (OtHV1), according to a new study published in Frontiers in Marine Science. Previous research documents the role herpesvirus infection, genotype, and organochlorine pesticides play in sea lion cancer development. However, synergism (collaboration) between viral infection and toxic chemical exposure increases cancer development odds.

“This study has implications for human health, as virally associated cancer occurs in humans, and likelihood of cancer development could similarly be increased by exposure to environmental contaminants. Efforts to prevent ecosystem contamination with persistent organic pollutants must be improved to protect both wildlife and human health.”

Filed under Wildlife/Mammals

Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Herbicide Use in “Regenerative” No-Till Contaminates Waterbodies

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Herbicide Use in “Regenerative” No-Till Contaminates Waterbodies

US study. (Beyond Pesticides, February 19, 2021)  'Tackling any one problem without precautionary attention to potential consequences of a solution — before it is enacted — is the opposite of the holistic understandings and strategies needed to solve environmental crises. Piecemeal approaches often generate unintended consequences. To wit: Vermont Public Radio (VPR) reports on revelations from a retired state scientist, Nat Shambaugh, who finds that farmers’ efforts to reduce agricultural runoff from fields into waterbodies, by planting cover crops, has resulted in significant increases in the use of herbicides to kill off those crops.'  

filed under Risk Assessment and water

Friday, January 22, 2021

Genetically Weakened Skin Barrier Allows for Easier Absorption of Toxic Chemicals

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Genetically Weakened Skin Barrier Allows for Easier Absorption of Toxic Chemicals

Genetically Weakened Skin Barrier Allows for Easier Absorption of Toxic Chemicals   (Beyond Pesticides, January 21, 2021)  (I)ndividuals with genetically weakened skin barrier protection experience higher rates of toxic chemicals (i.e., pesticides) absorption through the skin. Studies provide evidence that filaggrin genetic mutations can exacerbate the impacts of chemicals upon dermal (skin) exposure, causing various skin diseases like dermatitis and other chemical-related effects like asthma and cancer. Filaggrin is a protein that is critical to skin cell structure or epidermal homeostasis.   Dermal exposure is the most common pesticide exposure routes, compromising 95 percent of all pesticide exposure incidents. Furthermore, many pesticides contain chemicals that act as sensitizers (allergens). Therefore, it is essential to mitigate direct skin contact with these toxic chemicals and enforce proper application protocol.      Researchers find that pesticide levels are two times higher in individuals with FLG null mutations. Therefore, increased chemical absorption can have implications for human health.   FLG null mutations are relatively common, especially among people of European descent.

filed under Exposure and Skin

Friday, January 22, 2021

Ethanol Plant Processing Pesticide Coated Seeds Contaminates Nebraska Town

seeds treated with neonicotinoids

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Ethanol Plant Processing Pesticide Coated Seeds Contaminates Nebraska Town

US info. (Beyond Pesticides, January 13, 2021)  Under FIFRA (the Federal Insecticide Fungicide and Rodenticide Act), a clause known as the “treated article exemption” permits seeds to be coated with highly toxic pesticides without any requirement for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to assess environmental or public health effects of their use.This allows hazardous pesticides (primarily insecticides and fungicides) to be used indiscriminately with no effective oversight. Research finds that over 150 million acres of farmland are planted with toxic seeds, including nearly four tons of bee-killing neonicotinoids each year.

The AltEn plant is unique in that it is accepting unused treated seeds for farmers, advertising the site as a “recycling” facility, according to The Guardian. Apart from biofuel production, ethanol plants usually sell their spent, fermented grains to livestock farmers for feed. Processing toxic seeds has made that product too hazardous for cattle, so AltEn has been selling it to farmers as a soil amendment.

The neonicotinoid clothianidin was found in a waste mound at an astounding 427,000 parts per billion (ppb). A wastewater storage pond found high levels of three neonicotinoids – imidacloprid, cloathianidin, and thimethoxam. Thiamethoxam was discovered at 24,000 ppb, over 300 times higher than its acceptable level in drinking water (70ppb), and roughly 1,300 times higher than the level considered safe for aquatic organisms by EPA (17.5ppb).

Expectedly, pollinators near the plant are dying off. Judy Wu-Smart, PhD, bee researcher at University of Nebraska documented a sustained collapse of every beehive used by the university for a research project on a farm within a mile of the AltEn plant.

SNAP Comment: SK apparently has two ethanol plants with several more in Canada. I hope we donot make the same mistake under the idea of recycling. Why not? Because we did it about treated wood, allowing it to be used or burnt in an unsafe manner under the guise of 'recycling" and 'reusing.' Let's face it,some products are just too toxic for tha

filed under neonicotinoids and safety
 

Friday, January 22, 2021

EPA Confirms Widespread PFAS Contamination of Pesticides, Announces “Investigation,” Stops Short of Action to Protect Public

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EPA Confirms Widespread PFAS Contamination of Pesticides, Announces “Investigation,” Stops Short of Action to Protect Public

(Beyond Pesticides, January 20, 2021) The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has confirmed that PFAS (per and polyfluorinated alykyl substances) ‘forever chemicals’ are contaminating containers that store pesticide products, and subsequently the products themselves.

According to EPA, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) containers used to store and transport pesticides are commonly treated with fluoride in order to create a “chemical barrier” that will “prevent changes in chemical composition.” The fluorinated container is supposed to be more stable, and “less permeable, reactive, and dissolvable.”

Testing so far has been limited to one pesticide product supplier (likely the company Clarke, maker of Anvil 10+10), but resulted in detection of 9 different PFAS chemicals at levels the agency has not yet released. Earlier testing found PFAS chemicals well above safety limits established by states, as well as EPA’s health advisory.    There are also indications that fluorinated HDPE containers may have other storage uses, such as food packaging. EPA announced that it is subpoenaing the company that fluorinates HDPE containers under the Toxic Substances Control Act, but has done little else from a regulatory standpoint.    Contamination of widely used storage and transportation containers with chemicals that have been linked to cancer, liver damage, birth and developmental problems, reduced fertility, and asthma is a scandal without compare. It is unclear how long such a practice has been commonplace without any regulatory oversight. 

filed under Formulants/Inerts and Contaminants/ Contaminants

Friday, January 22, 2021

Alternatives to CCA-Treated Wood

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Alternatives to CCA-Treated Wood (PANNA Green Resource Center)

'Pressure-treated lumber is used in applications where decay and insect damage are of concern, such as for playground equipment, decks, telephone poles, building foundations, picnic tables, landscaping ties, wharfs, retaining walls, and fence posts. Preservative treatment chemicals make the wood inedible for fungi, insects, and other organisms that can destroy wood. Until its use for residential applications was voluntarily restricted by industry in January 2004, copper chromated arsenate (CCA) was the most common wood preservation treatment that a typical homeowner would encounter.' (same timeline in Canada)

Rubbing a cloth on the CCA treated wood in a playground collected toxic levels of arsenic and chromium.

When arsenic treated wood is new, it tends to have a greenish tint. When CCA wood is older, it is harder to tell. 

filed under treated wood/CCA 

Friday, January 22, 2021

Study Finds Link Between Pesticide Exposure and Rare Blood Cancer Predecessor (MGUS)

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Study Finds Link Between Pesticide Exposure and Rare Blood Cancer Predecessor (MGUS)

(Beyond Pesticide, January 14, 2021) Long-term exposure to permethrin and legacy organochlorine pesticides (aldrin, dieldrin, and lindane) increase the risk of developing monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), a blood disease that likely precedes multiple myeloma (MM)—a type of blood cancer,    This study highlights the importance of understanding how pesticide use can increase the risk of latent diseases, which do not readily develop upon initial exposure. Study researchers state, “Our findings provide important insights regarding exposures to specific pesticides that may contribute to the excess of MM among farmers.

The presence of abnormal proteins (monoclonal M protein) in the blood within bone marrow is a characterization of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Although MGUS is benign (non-cancerous) and largely asymptomatic, it can be premalignant or a precursor for cancer development. Annually, one percent of individuals with MGUS will develop cancers like multiple myeloma, lymphoma, or amyloidosis. However, the cancer risk increases in people whose protein levels are abnormally high, which can occur upon repeated exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals, like pesticides. Moreover, multiple myeloma is a rare type of blood cancer of the plasma cells, killing nearly 40 percent of 32,270 people it afflicts in the U.S. annually.

filed under cancer/ links between individual pesticides and cancer.

Sunday, January 10, 2021

Pesticides and Road Salt: A Toxic Mixture for Aquatic Communities

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Pesticides and Road Salt: A Toxic Mixture for Aquatic Communities

(Beyond Pesticides, January 7, 2021) Insecticides and road salts adversely interact to alter aquatic ecosystems, reducing organism abundance and size, according to a study in the journal Environmental Pollution. Pesticide use is ubiquitous, and contamination in rivers and streams is historically commonplace, containing at least one or more different chemicals.

Researchers performed a toxicity evaluation of six insecticides from three chemical classes (neonicotinoids: thiamethoxam, imidacloprid; organophosphates: chlorpyrifos, malathion; pyrethroids: cypermethrin, permethrin). Additionally, researchers note the potentially interactive effects of these insecticides with three concentrations of road salt (NaCl).   Researchers find that differing pesticide classes directly impact aquatic communities, and exposure to insecticides indirectly alters the food web in freshwater communities.    Although pesticides and road salts individually impact aquatic communities, this study is the first to demonstrate their interactive effects. 

filed under wildlife/aquatic organisms

Sunday, January 10, 2021

In support of the city of Prince Albert purchasing a Thermal Weed Control machine

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SNAP letter in support of Parks Manager Tim Yeaman's proposal to buy a Thermal Weed Control option to diminish pesticide use in the city.

In support of the city of Prince Albert purchasing a Thermal Weed Control machine 

filed under publications

Sunday, January 10, 2021

Long-Term Roundup Exposure Found to Harm Keystone Wildlife Species

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Long-Term Roundup Exposure Found to Harm Keystone Wildlife Species

(Beyond Pesticides, January 6, 2021)  “The problem is that much of the evidence is rooted in outdated toxicity tests which only look at the number of animals that die on exposure to extremely high concentrations of these chemicals,” Dr. Orsini said. “These tests also overlook the pathological effects arising from long-term exposure to low doses. What we’re proposing is that toxicity is measured by looking at what happens to the animal at a molecular and fitness level following long-term exposure, which encompasses the entire animal life cycle.”

Changes in fitness were seen for every trait except mortality. Roundup delayed average age of sexual/reproductive maturity, reduced size at maturity, decreased the total number of offspring produced, and increased developmental failure – as determined by the number of aborted eggs, and juveniles borne dead..  Researchers also observed damage to DNA, with glyphosate and Roundup showing only slight differences in affected pathways      Roundup and glyphosate were also found to indirectly alter both the makeup and total number of microbiota in the water flea’s gut. These changes were correlated with alterations to the way fat and carbon are metabolized, as well as the animal’s detoxification pathways.

filed under glyphosate and wildlife/aquatic organisms  

Sunday, January 10, 2021

Federal Court Blocks EPA from Weakening Farmworker Protections

US story.

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Federal Court Blocks EPA from Weakening Farmworker Protections

(Beyond Pesticides, January 5, 2021) 'In the waning days of 2020, a federal court provided a hint of hope that farmworkers will retain basic buffer zone protections from toxic pesticides. The District Court for the Southern District of New York  issued in late December a temporary restraining order against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), prohibiting the agency from implementing industry-friendly rules that weaken application exclusion zones (AEZs) for farmworkers.'

SNAP COMMENT: The work is never done...

filed under Legislation/Regulatory/ USA

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

The global distribution of acute unintentional pesticide poisoning: estimations based on a systematic review

385 million farmers and farmworkers are poisoned every year around the world.

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The global distribution of acute unintentional pesticide poisoning: estimations based on a systematic review    {Wolfgang Boedeker et al, BMC Public Health volume 20, Article number: 1875 (2020), 7 December 2020) 

'A recent systematic review of unintentional acute pesticide poisonings found that an estimated 385 million farmers and farmworkers are poisoned every year around the world. That’s about 44% of the global population of 860 million people working in agriculture. Fatalities were also estimated, and found to be around 11,000 annually. This is the first global estimate of unintentional pesticide poisonings done since 1990.'

filed under Pesticide Poisoning

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

The Lynchpin of Industrial Ag

Pesticides are the lynchpin of an unsustainable industrial agriculture system.

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The Lynchpin of Industrial Ag   (PANNA, The Pesticide Problem, Pesticides:The Big Picture) 'Pesticides are the lynchpin of an unsustainable industrial agriculture system.

This model of farming is inefficient and does not represent the cutting edge of modern farming. In 1940, we produced 2.3 food calories for every fossil fuel calorie used. By industrializing our food and farming systems, we now get a single food calorie for every 10 fossil fuel calories used — a 23-fold reduction in efficiency.'

filed under Pesticide Use

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

New Test Will Help Researchers Understand Pesticide Threats to Wild Bat Populations

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New Test Will Help Researchers Understand Pesticide Threats to Wild Bat Populations

(Beyond Pesticides, December 10, 2020) 'A new test developed by a team of Mexican and Canadian scientists will help field researchers detect early warning signs of pesticide exposure in wild bat populations.

The test in question is referred to as a micronucleus test. Although it does not measure the level of pesticide contaminating a bat’s body, it can assess genotoxicity (the effect of pesticides and other chemical agents that damage genetic information in a cell). This is done by taking blood samples of bats, and testing for the presence of micronuclei formation, which are materials in blood that contain damaged chromosomes not incorporated into a cell after cell division. 

What little research that has been conducted on the harm pesticides cause to bats shows significant cause for concern. Agricultural pesticide use results in a large proportion of a bat’s insect diet being contaminated with highly toxic chemicals. Bats are particularly sensitive to pesticides that bioconcentrate in fat (lipophilic pesticides); they develop large stores to use while migrating or hibernating, and high concentrations of toxic pesticides in this fat can result in significant poisoning as the body burns it off.  Despite the unique ways in which pesticides harm bats, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does not evaluate a pesticide’s effect on bats prior to registration.   Because bats are unusually long-lived for animals their size — lifespans range from 20 to 40 years — their bodies can accumulate pesticide residues over a long period, exacerbating adverse effects associated with those pesticides that can accumulate in fatty tissue.' A bat's 'consumption of large volumes of pesticide-contaminated insects can mean that these compounds may reach toxic levels in their brains — making them more susceptible to White Nose Syndrome.'.

ffiled under wildlife/mammals and monitoring pesticides

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

Video: Seed Keepers and Truth Tellers (PANNA)

From the Frontlines of GM Agriculture.

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Video: Seed Keepers and Truth Tellers (PANNA)

Seedkeepers and Truth Tellers From the Frontlines of GM Agriculture. You can find more information regarding the video and contributors at the video's home site, seedsandtruth.com.

filed under gmos

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

What’s Bad for Bees Could Be Bad for Marine Life, Too

The neonicotinoid imidacloprid hampers arthropods in the ocean.

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What’s Bad for Bees Could Be Bad for Marine Life, Too   Preliminary research shows that a popular insecticide hampers arthropods in the ocean. (by Ramin Skibba, PANNA, May 4, 2020)

'They found that coral exposed to the insecticide had reduced polyp activity—an indication of increased stress. Shrimplike amphipods were affected, too. Even at low doses, imidacloprid exposure inhibited their movement. And for some, high levels of exposure were fatal.

Hladik says most of the concentrations of neonics tested in Davis’s experiment were unrealistically high—beyond what is seen in the wild. But even low doses, she adds, could still be a hazard for marine life.'

filed under neonicotinoids and wildlife/ aquatic organisms

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

Investigation on Weed Killer Dicamba Adds to Pattern of Corporate Deception on Pesticide Hazards

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Investigation on Weed Killer Dicamba Adds to Pattern of Corporate Deception on Pesticide Hazards

(Beyond Pesticides, December 18, 2020) 'The Midwest Center’s investigation finds that Monsanto and BASF, makers of the extremely problematic herbicide dicamba, engaged in a variety of deceitful, unethical, and possibly fraudulent practices to enable its use. The bottom line is that the companies knew, before they released dicamba, about the massive damage it would cause — and then put it on the market.'

filed under Industry Shenanigans

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

Flying Blind in Weed Control

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Flying Blind in Weed Control  (by Margaret Wilson, Rodale Press, 10 December 2020) 

'Learn from the experts at Rodale Institute why blind cultivation may be the answer to getting ahead of weeds on your farm.'

filed under Weeds

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

Winter House Guests

how to deal with them naturally

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Winter House Guests (NCAP)

includes rodents, seed bugs, ladybugs, and natural pest repellents.

filed under Alternatives

Tuesday, January 5, 2021

Chemicals to Avoid: Groundbreaking Database of Illnesses from Pesticide Exposure Launched

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Chemicals to Avoid: Groundbreaking Database of Illnesses from Pesticide Exposure Launched

(Beyond Pesticides, December 11, 2020) The national environmental and public health group Beyond Pesticides announced today the updating of its Pesticide-Induced Diseases Database (PIDD), including over 1,100 study entries, with a relational search feature to address the complex pervasiveness of adverse health effects of pesticides

filed under pesticides and health