• Learn to Manage Pests Naturally
  • Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Driving Near Recently Sprayed Fields Exposes People to Pesticides
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Learn About Pesticides in Foods
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • SNAP Tour of Organic Vegetable Garden
  • Grow a Lush Garden Organically

Archives for 2022

Sunday, June 26, 2022

Civil society and Indigenous Peoples’ appeal to the FAO Council to rescind the FAO partnership agreement with CropLife International

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Civil society and Indigenous Peoples’ appeal to the FAO Council to rescind the FAO partnership agreement with CropLife International 

Ahead of the FAO Council’s 170th session that began on June 13, PAN submitted to members of the Council a letter co-sponsored by 10 other global networks on behalf of 430 organizations from 69 countries, urging Member States to take immediate action in the Council session and rescind the agency’s partnership with CropLife International.

Thursday, June 16, 2022

Non-Toxic Ways to Deal with Weeds in the Lawn and Garden

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Non-Toxic Ways to Deal with Weeds in the Lawn and Garden (Toxic-free Future)

generally good article includes sections on moss, invasives and mulching. I would like to add the use of infrared or steam weeders for hard and gravel surfaces, sources of which are presented in Resources. alternatives/weeding and also on this page.

filed under weeds

Monday, June 13, 2022

Cockroaches Show Increasing Resistance to Sugar-Laden Baits

Cockroaches Show Increasing Resistance to Sugar-Laden Baits

(Beyond Pesticides, June 1, 2022) A new evolutionary strategy spreading among German cockroaches is making them more difficult to kill than ever before. In a recent publication in Nature Communications Biology, scientists determined that cockroaches are developing an aversion to sugar baits containing glucose, with impacts that are changing their behavior and altering their mating rituals. “We are constantly in an evolutionary battle with cockroaches,”

filed under resistance/insecticides and alternatives/insects/ additional information

Monday, June 13, 2022

Glyphosate Weed Killer Disrupts Bumblebees’ Nest Temperature, Leading to Colony Failure

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Glyphosate Weed Killer Disrupts Bumblebees’ Nest Temperature, Leading to Colony Failure

(Beyond Pesticides, June 7, 2022) 'Bumblebee colonies exposed to low levels of the weed killer glyphosate are unable to adequately regulate nest temperature, imperiling the next generation of bumblebees and long-term colony growth and survival.' Most pesticide regulatory systems refuse to adequately account for sublethal impacts, including the US EPA and, I suspect, the PMRA.

filed under insects and glyphosate

Monday, June 13, 2022

DDT Still Harming Birds of Prey, 50 Years After Its Ban

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DDT Still Harming Birds of Prey, 50 Years After Its Ban

(Beyond Pesticides, May 31, 2022) 'Fifty years after the banning of DDT, the notorious insecticide is still harming iconic birds of prey along the California coastline. According to research published in Environmental Science and Technology, California condors and marine mammals along California’s coast are contaminated with several dozen different halogenated organic compounds (hazardous, often-chlorinated chemicals) related to DDT, chlordane, and other now-banned legacy chemicals.'

filed under birds

Monday, June 13, 2022

Plastic Coated Pesticides Adding to Soil and Ecosystem Contamination with Microplastics

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Plastic Coated Pesticides Adding to Soil and Ecosystem Contamination with Microplastics

(Beyond Pesticides, June 3, 2022) This article explains the role of plastics in climate change as well as the widespread contamination of everything wiht them. Agricultural uses of plastics go from synthetic mulches to coating pesticides and fertilizers, purportedly to allow for controlled release of chemicals or nutrients. '...agriculture is one of the largest users of products with intentionally added microplastics, and that this use is rising (11% growth is projected for 2018 to 2025). Microplastics remain in the soil long after the encapsulation’s function — slow release — ends, polluting the soil and readily dispersing into the air or water.' These coatings are greenwashed as “planet-safe” choices. The marketing 'involves no mention of “plastics,” but instead, use of less well-known and poorly understood terms, such as “polymer,” in describing the coating material. Further, “plastic encapsulation may be portrayed as a plus for the environment.'

although not technically a pesticide, I have linked this to the soil page. As plastics are well known for adsorbing all kinds of toxins, miroplastics may increase the half-life of applied pesticides. 

 

Saturday, June 11, 2022

Broadscale Devastating Ecological and Health Effects Associated with Herbicide Indaziflam; Ask To Go Organic

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Broadscale Devastating Ecological and Health Effects Associated with Herbicide Indaziflam; Ask To Go Organic

(Beyond Pesticides, May 23, 2022)  'The climate change-induced increase in wildfire frequency and intensity has lent new urgency to efforts to manage so-called “invasive” plants. Unfortunately, the herbicide-based approach favored by many is both counterproductive and hazardous.

Use of the herbicide indaziflam is an example of the ineffectiveness of management based on herbicides. While indaziflam is considered a “selective” herbicide, it actually kills and prevents germination of a wide range of broad-leaved plants and grasses and comes close to being a soil sterilant. The action on seedlings is long-lasting, thus inhibiting the growth and establishment of a resilient plant community that is resistant to invasion. Given its persistence and nonselective action and the extent of the damage it causes to native soil seed banks and plant biodiversity, indaziflam could contribute to the eventual ecological collapse of ecosystems where it’s applied, similar to the cascading impacts of the systemic insecticides, fipronil and the neonicotinoids on animals.'

 'Indaziflam’s health effects are also significant. The nervous system is the major target for toxicity in mammals.'

SNAP Comment: As of 11 June 2022, there are 7 indaziflam labels registered by the PMRA. Indaziflam was promoted and used for 10 years with an incomplete (“conditional”) registration in the US. It was likely the same in Canada as we still allowed conditional registrations at that time. Several labels are registered for use in orchards and containers.

filed under Indaziflam 

Saturday, June 11, 2022

Creeping bellflower (Campanula rapunculoides) control

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Creeping bellflower (Campanula rapunculoides) control (Edmonton Horticultural Society on Facebook)

My whole yard is surrounded by this awful weed. It is my nemesis....

filed under weeds/natural control of Individual weeds

Saturday, June 11, 2022

Neurotoxic Pesticides Disrupt Gut Function Linked to Parkinson’s Disease Development

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Neurotoxic Pesticides Disrupt Gut Function Linked to Parkinson’s Disease Development

(Beyond Pesticides, May 26, 2022) A study published in The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology finds environmental exposure to neurotoxic pesticides increases Parkinson’s Disease (PD) risk through gastrointestinal (GI) disruption. Research finds exposure to chemical toxicants, like pesticides, can cause neurotoxic effects or exacerbate preexisting chemical damage to the nervous system. Although the mechanism by which pesticides induce disease development remains unclear, this study suggests environmental pesticide exposure disrupts GI cells responsible for supporting the autonomic nervous system. Enteric glial cells (EGCs) are GI cells that play a critical role in the functional changes that accompany GI dysfunction, as this dysfunction is one of the earliest symptoms indicating the onset of PD.

filed under digestive tract and nervous system effects/ Parkinson's

Saturday, June 4, 2022

Mother s Exposure to Pesticides during Pregnancy Results in Sleep-Related Problems among Daughters

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Mother’s Exposure to Pesticides during Pregnancy Results in Sleep-Related Problems among Daughters

(Beyond Pesticides, April 20, 2022)  'Levels of inadequate sleep patterns are rising among children and adolescents. Reports find variability in sleep duration results in higher rates of depression, anxiety, and fatigue among juveniles. Since sleep is an important factor in normal brain development, disturbance in sleep patterns, such as sleeping too much or too little, can result in long-term associations between sleep and the brain’s white matter integrity (responsible for age-dependent cognitive function).  The results demonstrate that exposure to chlorpyrifos, but not pyrethroids, during pregnancy have greater associations with longer sleep duration and changes in sleep patterns among offspring.

filed under endocrine disruption

Saturday, June 4, 2022

Study of Dramatic Flying Insect Declines Reinforces Earlier Findings

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Study of Dramatic Flying Insect Declines Reinforces Earlier Findings

UK study. (Beyond Pesticides, May 17, 2022)  'Between 2004 and 2021, 58.5% fewer flying insects were squashed onto car license plates. “The results from the Bugs Matter study should shock and concern us all,” says Paul Hadaway, conservation director at Kent Wildlife Trust, which conducted the study alongside UK organization Buglife. “We are seeing declines in insects which reflect the enormous threats and loss of wildlife more broadly across the Country.   These results line up with the latest data on the insect apocalypse from peer-reviewed scientific literature. '

filed under insects

Saturday, June 4, 2022

Pesticide Concentration through Metamorphosis Contaminates Birds and Bats

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Pesticide Concentration through Metamorphosis Contaminates Birds and Bats

(Beyond Pesticides, April 27, 2022) Pesticides can accumulate in aquatic fly larvae, be retained through metamorphosis, and represent a source of chronic pesticide exposure to birds and bats, according to research published in Environmental Science and Technology earlier this month. ...researchers aimed their study at present use fungicides and herbicides that have not yet undergone similar scrutiny. This includes seven fungicides—azoxystrobin, boscalid, cyflufenamid, fluopyram, tebuconazole, pyrimethanil, and trifloxystrobin—and two herbicides—napropamide and propyzamide. The study notes that formulated end use products, rather than technical grade active ingredients, were used in order to best mimic real world exposure conditions.

Exposed midge larvae were then allowed to metamorphosize into adults. After this process, researchers again tested the level of pesticide concentrated in the flies. Adult flies in the medium and high exposure levels all retained pesticides in their bodies, and five of the nine pesticides (trifloxystrobin, tebuconazole, boscalid, propyzamide, azoxystrobin) were also found in adult midges exposed to the lowest treatment levels.

It was determined that roughly 10-94 parts per billion of pesticide per year is moving from aquatic to terrestrial ecosystems as a result of this process. ...the researchers find that bats and birds feeding on contaminated midges could result in low to moderate chronic pesticide exposure.

SNAP Comment: There are currently 46 pesticides containing azoxystrobin registered in Canada, 19 containing boscalid, 0 with cyflufenamid, 18 with fluopyram, 57with tebuconazole, 6 with pyrimethanil, 28 with trifloxystrobin, 8 with napropamide and 4 with propyzamide. This research is relevant to Canada. Swallows and especially shorebirds depend on aquatic insects.

filed under aquatic organismsbirds, mammals

Saturday, June 4, 2022

Ocean Health: First Reports of Salmon Lice Resistance in the Pacific Ocean Threatens Local Ecosystems

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Ocean Health: First Reports of Salmon Lice Resistance in the Pacific Ocean Threatens Local Ecosystems

(Beyond Pesticides, April 12, 2022) 'A recent study published in Scientific Reports warns that parasitic salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) in Pacific Ocean open-net fish farming operations are becoming resistant to emamectin benzoate (EMB), an active ingredient used to control salmon lice population in North America, both in the U.S. and British Columbia, Canada. Previously, researchers believed parasitic salmon lice only had high rates of chemical resistance in the Atlantic region due to the mixing of farmed and wild salmon. However, Pacific salmon lice are exhibiting similar rates of decreased sensitivity to EMB from various sources, including a decrease in the wild Pacific salmon population, overuse of chemical treatments, and reliance on single chemical treatments.'

filed under resistance

Saturday, June 4, 2022

Environmental Pesticide Exposure Alters Gut Microbes, Increasing Urgency for Organic Transition

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Environmental Pesticide Exposure Alters Gut Microbes, Increasing Urgency for Organic Transition

UK study. (Beyond Pesticides, May 12, 2022) A report published in Environmental Health finds that exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of pesticides can alter gut microbial communities, as demonstrated through fecal samples. Over 300 environmental contaminants and their byproducts, including pesticides, are chemicals commonly present in human blood and urine samples.     The report finds all urine samples contain pyrethroid or organophosphate insecticide residues, with 53 percent of urine samples containing glyphosate. Individuals who consume more  fruits and vegetables grown with chemical-intensive practices have higher concentrations of organophosphate residues. Although urinary metabolite (pesticide breakdown product) excretion lacks a correlation with gut microbial changes, there are 34 associations between the concentration of pesticide residues and metabolite residues in fecal matter and gut health.

SNAP comment: There are more than 80,000 chemicals on the market. Only a few have been tested for presence in humans.

filed under digestive tract/human microbiome

Saturday, June 4, 2022

Glyphosate Breakdown Product, Associated with Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage Among Children

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Glyphosate Breakdown Product, Associated with Oxidative Stress and DNA Damage Among Children

(Beyond Pesticides, April 28, 2022) 'A study in Environmental Research finds that glyphosate’s primary metabolite (breakdown product), aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA), induces DNA damage through oxidative stress among subpopulations of primary school children. The results find that AMPA, but not glyphosate, has a positive association with DNA damage via oxidation. Moreover, the metabolites of pyrethroids (3-PBA) and chlorpyrifos (TCPy) are also associated with DNA damage and oxidative stress. Lipid damage from oxidative stress did not occur among these pesticides. However, the results suggest parental education levels influence urinary pyrethroid levels. ...Glyphosate degrades relatively quickly in the environment, between five and 20 days, leaving behind AMPA, which is highly persistent with a half-life of 151 days.

SNAP Comment: As illustrated here, AMPA, the byproduct of glyphosate, persists a lot longer in the environment. This is not a unique case. Not only can degradation byproducts persisit  longer, they can also be more toxic than the original product. Current registration regulations generally overlook the effects of byporducts.

filed under children /glyphosate

Saturday, June 4, 2022

Conventional Apples Found to Be Coated in Fungicides and Drug-Resistant Fungi

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Conventional Apples Found to Be Coated in Fungicides and Drug-Resistant Fungi

(Beyond Pesticides, April 6, 2022) Conventional apples sold at market and sprayed with synthetic fungicides may not only contain drug-resistant fungi, but function as a transmission reservoir and route to spread these dangerous pathogens, finds research published in mBio late last month by a team of researchers from India and Canada. As reports of fungal resistance rise, particularly in hospitals and among the immunocompromised, there is an urgent need to understand and address the root causes of these emerging disease threats. 

Overall, eight (13%) of apples had the presence of C. auris on its surface. All of the isolates were found in stored fruits purchased at market, while those purchased directly from the orchards contained no pathogenic fungi. Fungicides were found to be present on every apple that also contained C. auris, and included a range of different classes with varying modes of action. This included triazole fungicides (such as tebuconazole, difenoconazole, sulfentrazone, and flusilazole), methyl benzimidazole carbamates (such as carbendazim and thiabendazole), phthalimides like captan, pyridinecarboxamides like boscalid, aromatic amines like diphenylamine, the phenolpyrrole fludoxonil, and quinone outside inhibitors (like kresoxim-methyl and pyraclostrobin).   However, the presence of fungicides was generally evenly distributed between those found with and without drug-resistant pathogenic C. auris. Fresh fruit from neither conventional nor organic orchards contained C. auris, but only organic apples were free of any fungicide residue, while conventional apples were contaminated with two or three fungicides on each fruit. Further isolation and culture of C. auris apples found them to have reduced sensitivity to commonly found triazole fungicides.

filed under food and immune/ infection

Saturday, June 4, 2022

Study Finds Chemical Exposure Increasing among Pregnant Women

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Study Finds Chemical Exposure Increasing among Pregnant Women

(Beyond Pesticides, May 11, 2022) U.S. study. 'Pregnant women are being exposed to increasing amounts of dangerous industrial chemicals, according to research published this week in Environmental Science and Technology. The chemicals in question include pesticides, plastics, and parabens, as well as ‘replacement chemicals’ for substances like phthalates and bisphenols that have gained notoriety for risks to public health.

Of the 103 chemicals reviewed, over 80% is detected in at least one woman enrolled in the research. One third of the compounds is found in over 50% of women. In particular, the study finds that many women have levels of neonicotinoid insecticides in their urine...a range of data over the last decade has pointed to concerning impacts on human development from prenatal exposure. Peer-reviewed studies have linked these exposures to autism like symptoms, birth defects in the heart, and birth defects in the brain, per a review by the Natural Resources Defense Council.

Body burden of these hazardous chemicals are disproportionate between women of different races and backgrounds. Higher exposure amounts is seen in non-white women, those with less education, and pregnant women who are single. Researchers also note that Latinas encountered higher levels of parabens, bisphenols, and phthalates... These data line up with recent research showing that BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) communities are exposed to pesticides at disproportionately higher rates than other communities. '

filed under exposure

Saturday, June 4, 2022

CDC Study: Pesticide Use Does Not Reduce Risk of Lyme, Other Tick-Borne Disease

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CDC Study: Pesticide Use Does Not Reduce Risk of Lyme, Other Tick-Borne Disease

(Beyond Pesticides, April 26, 2022) 'Using pesticides to reduce the number of ticks in residential areas does not translate to lower rates of tick-borne disease in humans.' This finding is the culmination of (over a decade of) research overseen by scientists at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Neither direct pesticide applications to individual household lawns or a broader, neighborhood-wide implementation of control measures played a role in reducing tick-borne disease.

The number of ticks collected in neighborhoods was reduced by 53% after using TCS (bait boxes for carrier rodents), but reductions from Met52 ( fungus) were not found to be statistically significant. The number of ticks reported on white-footed mice was also reduced by roughly half due to TCS boxes, but Met52 again showed no statistical reduction. The number of ticks found on pets was not reduced to a statistically significant level, but incidence of disease was half of what it was in prior years for both TCS and Met52 applied neighborhoods. (based on paraticipant reporting) For humans, however, no statistical reduction in tick encounters was experienced, nor was there any reduction in the number of reported tick-borne diseases during the study period.

Friday, June 3, 2022

BACKGROUNDER: Busting the myths about cosmetic pesticide bans

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BACKGROUNDER: Busting the myths about cosmetic pesticide bans (EcoJustice)  worth repeating every year at this time when cosmetic pesticide use starts in earnest.

Well-researched 10 point backgrounder. Full of links.

filed under  bylaws/general, lawn/turf and safety

Monday, May 23, 2022

Bill Banning Aerial Herbicides on Forestland Vetoed by Mill

Maine Gov. Janet Mills has vetoed a bill to ban aerial spraying of glyphosate in forests

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Bill Banning Aerial Herbicides on Forestland Vetoed by Mill  (Associated Press, June 26, 2021)

Maine Gov. Janet Mills has vetoed a bill to ban aerial spraying of glyphosate in forestland. Democratic Senate President Troy Jackson spent 17 years fighting the spraying, and finally got the bill passed in 2021, only to have her veto it!

SNAP Comment: a larger buffer zone to protect water will do little to control fires or provide habitat.

filed under Legislation/Regulatory/USA

Saturday, May 21, 2022

How the ghouls of Monsanto influenced science and the media

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How the ghouls of Monsanto influenced science and the media   (GM Watch, 04 May 2022)

Last week, the award-winning investigative journalist Paul Thacker gave a presentation at Carleton University on Monsanto’s ghostwriting to influence both science and media, detailing Monsanto’s ghostwriting campaign which kicked off in 2015 to attack the World Health Organization’s cancer agency, after it found glyphosate was a “probable carcinogen.”   A year after Monsanto began plotting their 2015 attack on IARC, the journal Critical Reviews in Toxicology (CRT) published a special issue titled “An Independent Review of the Carcinogenic Potential of Glyphosate.” But emails show Monsanto directed and edited the studies... In 2015, Monsanto secretly recruited scientists from Harvard, Cornell University and three other schools to write about the benefits of GMO technology. In the case of Harvard’s Calestous Juma, Monsanto suggested the topic and provided a summary and headline.' and a lot more with links.

filed under glyphosate and industry shenanigans/propaganda

Saturday, May 21, 2022

Why Did Health Canada Change Their Mind About Neonics?

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Why Did Health Canada Change Their Mind About Neonics?   (Canadian Wildlife Federation blog, May 18, 2022) 

In 2018, the PMRA recommended that ALL agricultural, ornamental and greenhouse uses be cancelled and phased out over a three to five year period.  This is why, in spring 2021, we were shocked when Health Canada did a complete about-face. Suddenly, these pesticides that were so hazardous to aquatic life that their use needed to be terminated, were deemed “largely acceptable with some mitigation.”    The agricultural chemical industry provided the PMRA with additional data on contamination levels in the prairies, and these data were used by the federal government to base their reversal decision. While that is not in and of itself a bad thing, these data are now considered to be proprietary by the government. 

filed under neonicotinoids and Legislation/Regulatory/Canada
 

Sunday, May 15, 2022

CN spraying schedule for 2022

across Canada

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CN spraying schedule for 2022 for all of Canada. A few 'No spray" but  most are pending right now.

filed under Railroads

Monday, April 25, 2022

Giving Up Glyphosate

The forestry industry’s prized pesticide may be harming people and nature. Is it time to stop spraying?

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Giving Up Glyphosate
The forestry industry’s prized pesticide may be harming people and nature. Is it time to stop spraying? (by Moira Donovan, Maisonneuve, 26 January 2022)

History of glyphosate spraying if forestry, environmental and health effects and the politics. Also  the trial methods that could reduce herbicide use at several points along the process. Ontario and New Brunswick stories. 

SNAP Comment: I would like to address the following quote: 'Because mammals and vertebrates don’t have the cellular pathway affected by glyphosate, some scientists and industry players have said that this makes the chemical relatively safe for people.' Whie mammals and people don't have this cellular pathway, the bacteria living within us do and are affected. 

filed under forestry/herbicide

Saturday, April 23, 2022

Neonic Pesticides: Potential Risks to Brain and Sperm

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Neonic Pesticides: Potential Risks to Brain and Sperm  (Jennifer Sass, PANNA,January 06, 2021) where CDC biomonitoring indicates over 50% of the US population is regularly exposed to neonics as evidenced by their breakdown productsi urine. Neonics have been linked to birth defects, developmental neurotoxicity, reduced thyroid function, sensorimotor deficits in rats, and poor sperm qhalityand quantity.

SNAP Comment:   the article does a good job of exploring the various routes of exposure, except one: neonics in flea collars for pets (Seresto brand in the US) and monthly liquid treatments for fleas and lice for pets which form most of the imidacloprid labels in Canada.

filed under children/neonics and neonicotinoids

Saturday, April 23, 2022

Neonics under fire

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Neonics under fire (Jennifer Sass, PANNA blog 21 April 2022)

Maine prohibited use of most neonics on residential landscapes, and New Jersey passed a law that prohibits outdoor, non-agricultural neonic uses. Great links to other posts regarding pollinators and human and animal health including:  Neonic Pesticides: Potential Risks to Brain and Sperm  (Jennifer Sass, PANNA,January 06, 2021) where CDC biomonitoring indicates over 50% of the US population is regularly exposed to neonics as evidenced by their breakdown productsi urine. It does a good job of exploring the various routs of exposure, except one: neonics in flea collars for pets (Seresto brand in the US) and monthly liquid treatments for fleas and lice for pets which form most of the imidacloprid labels in Canada.

filed under bylaws/USA

Friday, April 22, 2022

Former Monsanto CEO files for protective order in Roundup case

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Former Monsanto CEO files for protective order in Roundup case
Former top exec Hugh Grant does not want to testify in upcoming trial

(by Carey Gillam, Unspun (blog))

Thursday, April 21, 2022

Regina City Council voted in favour of a report on a cosmetic bylaw

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Regina City Council voted in favour of a report on a cosmetic bylaw (email from Councillor Cheryl Stadnychyk)
The motion to have a report on a cosmetic pesticide ban passed 7-3. Voting against were Mayor Masters, Terina Shaw and Lori Bresciani. 
The report will come back to Council in early 2023. In the meantime, there will be public consultation so it will be important to continue to raise issues and do public awareness. 
The mayor spoke against and repeatedly brought up that Manitoba is walking back some aspects of its ban. She also believes that the public doesn’t support a ban and that we are spending $70,000 for a report that won’t go anywhere. 
will link the Leader Post article if one comes out.
 

Tuesday, April 19, 2022

Canfor ‘pest management’ consultation triggers stakeholders’ concerns about glyphosate herbicide

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Canfor ‘pest management’ consultation triggers stakeholders’ concerns about glyphosate herbicide  (BC story. Rules about replanted forests likely vary between provinces)

Canfor served notice to forest stakeholders on its five-year ‘pest management plan’ for harvested forest blocks around the Prince George region, but wouldn’t reveal which specific tracts of Crown land are being considered for glyphosate herbicide aer
(Fran Yanor - Local Journalism Initiative Reporter (The Rocky Mountain Goat) Nov 13, 2020)

'"Forestry management stipulates replanted forests must be 95 per cent conifer. Timber companies are responsible for replanted trees until they reach the ‘free-to-grow’ stage, when they can survive on their own. To speed growth of new conifers, glyphosate solutions are sprayed from planes across massive cut blocks to wipe out deciduous competition.
“It's not based on (ecological) science,” said Steidle. “It's based on the science of agriculture, an agricultural mindset to maximize yields.”

Mike Morris, Liberal MLA for Prince George-Mackenzie, has lived, hunted, fished and trapped in the Prince George Timber Supply Area (TSA) for upwards of 50 years. During that time, he’s seen dramatic effects from logging and spraying.
Forests in the northern interior naturally have a range of deciduous trees and plants, said Morris. “Glyphosate kills that and virtually eliminates all wildlife populations within the area being: sprayed,” said Morris. “It's pretty tragic.”'

SNAP Comment: Glyphosate mostly indirectly eliminates wildlife populations by eliminating their food sources.

filed under forestry/herbicide and glyphosate

Friday, April 15, 2022

It is Time to Show Mosquitoes a Little Love - Here is Why

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It's Time to Show Mosquitoes a Little Love - Here's Why  (EcoWest News, 12 April 2022)

Interestng article on the ecological role of mosquitoes and the effects , interesting factss and the effects of the mosquito control Bti (natural) and methoprene on wildlife. 'Other approaches are worth investigating in order to maintain mosquitoes as pollinators and important elements in the food chain. Fernand suggests a campaign to get rid of stagnant water as this is where mosquitoes thrive. Dan Peach suggests “targeting specific mosquito species or making the mosquitoes themselves immune to pathogens and thus unable to spread them would protect humans while keeping the ecosystem function of mosquitoes intact”. SNAP Ccomment: During the West NIle virus period, there were education programs for getting rid of stagnant water. It is still a cornersstone of mosquito control even if we are forgetting to talk about it. 

filed under mosquito control

Thursday, April 14, 2022

Opinion: No reasonable scenario to allow cosmetic pesticides in city

I would be hard pressed to imagine a scenario in which pesticides would be protecting our health or our safety

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Opinion: No reasonable scenario to allow cosmetic pesticides in city

I would be hard pressed to imagine a scenario in which pesticides would be protecting our health or our safety, writes Tanya Dahms,   (Leader Post Letter to the editor by Tanya Dahms, Apr 13, 2022)  This powerful etter dispels misinformation about pesticides. 

Here is a document link in case it disappears from the Leader Post web site. Tanya Dahms letter to editor of the Regina Leader Post

filed under bylaws/provincial/ Saskatchewan/Regina and Presentations and publications/media

Thursday, April 14, 2022

Regina city council discusses possible regulation, ban of cosmetic pesticide use

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Regina city council discusses possible regulation, ban of cosmetic pesticide use

"I do not use pesticides in my own garden, in clients’ gardens, or in community-based projects. Pesticides create more harm than good, and simply are not needed."     (Jennifer Ackerman, Regina Leader Post,  City Hall, Mar 16, 2022) 

'Among them was Paule Hjertaas, president and spokesperson of the Saskatchewan Network for Alternatives to Pesticides (SNAP).

Hjertaas founded SNAP after suffering what she called “severe” health issues related to pesticide exposure. It is this health condition that inspired her to become an advocate for alternatives to pesticides.

“Councillor Stadnichuk’s motion is striking in that it does not question the effects of pesticides on wildlife, pets, people and the environment. It states them as facts,” she said to council. “It also builds on Regina’s current commitment to environmental sustainability, health, and well-being through its to Official Community Plan.”

filed under bylaws/provincial/ Saskatchewan/Regina and Presentations and publications/ media

Wednesday, April 13, 2022

Montreal becomes first Canadian jurisdiction to ban glyphosate

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Montreal becomes first Canadian jurisdiction to ban glyphosate  (Marian Scott, Montreal Gazette, August 23, 2021)

filed under Bylaw/provincial/Quebec

Wednesday, April 13, 2022

Conventional Apples Found to Be Coated in Fungicides and Drug-Resistant Fungi

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Conventional Apples Found to Be Coated in Fungicides and Drug-Resistant Fungi

(Beyond Pesticides, April 6, 2022) 'Conventional apples sold at market and sprayed with synthetic fungicides may not only contain drug-resistant fungi, but function as a transmission reservoir and route to spread these dangerous pathogens.' The fungus was only found on stored apples, not ones purchased from the orchard.

'Fungicides were found to be present on every apple that also contained C. auris, and included a range of different classes with varying modes of action. This included triazole fungicides (such as tebuconazole, difenoconazole, sulfentrazone, and flusilazole), methyl benzimidazole carbamates (such as carbendazim and thiabendazole), phthalimides like captan, pyridinecarboxamides like boscalid, aromatic amines like diphenylamine, the phenolpyrrole fludoxonil, and quinone outside inhibitors (like kresoxim-methyl and pyraclostrobin).. However, the presence of fungicides was generally evenly distributed between those found with and without drug-resistant pathogenic C. auris. Fresh fruit from neither conventional nor organic orchards contained C. auris, but only organic apples were free of any fungicide residue, while conventional apples were contaminated with two or three fungicides on each fruit. Further isolation and culture of C. auris apples found them to have reduced sensitivity to commonly found triazole fungicides.

In the context of the present study, the source of a pathogen resistant fungal outbreak in a hospital could conceivably be caused by the fruit served in the hospital cafeteria sourced through a global supply chain.'

filed under resistance/fungicide

Wednesday, April 13, 2022

Health Implications: Common Herbicide 2,4-D Threatens Most Species Health, Especially Vertebrates

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Health Implications: Common Herbicide 2,4-D Threatens Most Species Health, Especially Vertebrates

While 2,4-D use had often been replaced by glyphosate, it is making a comeback in formulation with glyphosate for GMO crops. It is also apparently still used in B.C.forestry.

(Beyond Pesticides, April 5, 2022) 'A meta-analysis by the Federal University of Technology – Paraná finds the herbicide 2,4-D causes indiscriminate harm, increasing the mortality rate among exposed animals. The severity of chemical exposure relies on species sensitivity, exposure rate, and lifecycle stage. However, commercial formulations of 2,4-D, commonly used in the environment, prompt a higher species mortality rate than technical (pure) 2,4-D alone. Like many other common herbicides such as glyphosate, 2,4-D has global uses that allow the chemical to accumulate in the environment, including soils, waterways, and tissues of non-target species.  ... vertebrates experience higher mortality rates from 2,4-D exposure, with fish and birds presenting the highest mortality rate. '

(2.4-D) is a possible human carcinogen (e.g., soft tissue sarcoma and nonHodgkin lymphoma), can cause neurotoxicities like the development of ALS and loss of smell, kidney/liver damage, and endocrine disruption. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finds babies born near areas of high 2,4-D use, such as farming communities, have higher rates of birth abnormalities, respiratory and cardiovascular issues, and developmental defects. 

filed under 2,4-D and formulants/inerts//toxicity

Saturday, April 9, 2022

Documents show concerns about instructor s views on glyphosate ahead of firing

Cumberland s criticisms triggered emails between Natural Resources, college director, J.D. Irving

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Documents show concerns about instructor's views on glyphosate ahead of firing

Cumberland's criticisms triggered emails between Natural Resources, college director, J.D. Irving  (Jacques Poitras, CBC News, Apr 03, 2022)

The college denies Cumberland was fired for his views on glyphosate, though his dismissal letter says his "undermining" of the conference was one of the reasons.

Cumberland's wrongful dismissal lawsuit is scheduled to go to trial April 4.

His lawyer Paul Champ obtained the 169 pages of documents and emails through the federal Access to Information Act and gave them to CBC News.

Cumberland emailed Prof. Van Lantz, the dean of forestry at the University of New Brunswick, on Jan. 16, 2019.

He complained that the upcoming scientific conference hosted by UNB on vegetation management science was presenting "but one perspective" on glyphosate and should have relied on "a broader range of so-called 'experts.'"

He accused the forest industry of hiring "select scientists" to provide their opinions on the herbicide while ignoring "independent research" and "critical analysis" on the issue.

Cumberland sent a similar note to all faculty and students at the college, who had been invited to the seminar.

Updates from Rob Cumberland: 'The entire trial was cancelled with the rationale that the judge tested positive for Covid 19.  The trial was re-scheduled for August 29-Sept 4, and Sept 12-14.' ( personal communication) Len Ritter (a well-known pesticide industry shill) was one of the presenters at the conference.

SNAP Comment: I understand that it is not unusual for industry groups to offer to sponsor a conference.The issue is usually that they get complete control of the agenda and choose ALL the speakers. I have seen it documented in the field of health as well (diabetes, multiple chemical sensitivities). This is not good for science as in only presents what seems like a 'unified view' while suppressing other evidence.

filed under: Industry Shenanigans/Defamation and Legal/Litigation/Canada

Thursday, April 7, 2022

Coverup of Dog Deaths at EPA, According to Internal Emails on Seresto Flea and Tick Collars

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Coverup of Dog Deaths at EPA, According to Internal Emails on Seresto Flea and Tick Collars

(Beyond Pesticides, April 1, 2022) According to reporting by E&E’s Greenwire, internal emails at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) show that career scientists at the agency expressed worry about pesticide-laced pet collars, such as the notorious Seresto flea and tick collars, but that EPA managers “instructed them to avoid documenting those worries in publicly accessible records.” The emails were released pursuant to a 2021 FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) lawsuit, brought by the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD), that sought records of internal communications. 

filed under pets and industry shenanigans/regulatory and legal

Thursday, April 7, 2022

Certain Essential Oils Found To Be Highly Effective at Killing Mosquito Larvae and Adults

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Certain Essential Oils Found To Be Highly Effective at Killing Mosquito Larvae and Adults

(Beyond Pesticides, March 24, 2022) A range of essential oils can provide high levels of larvicidal and adulticidal activity against Culex pipiens a widespread N.A.mosquito (also commen in SK) that is known to vector West Nile virus and Saint Louis encephalitis, among other diseases.

In sum, the researchers note, “Camellia sinensis tea plant and F. vulgare fennel were the most potent larvicides whereas V. odorata sweet violet, T. vulgaris garden thyme, An. Graveolens dill and N. sativa fennel flower were the best adulticides and they could be used for integrated mosquito control… EOs could serve as suitable alternatives to synthetic insecticides because they are relatively safe, available, and biodegradable.”

filed under mosquito control

Thursday, April 7, 2022

Outcry grows as B.C. government agency plans widespread South Coast herbicide spray

targets native hard woods and Indigenous medicines and food in efforts to increase lumber output

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Outcry grows as B.C. government agency plans widespread South Coast herbicide spray

The five-year Pest Management Plan, which covers Squamish to Hope, targets native hard woods and Indigenous medicines and food in efforts to increase lumber output. (by Charlie Carey, North Shore News, 24 march 2022)

'The proposed management plan would come into effect on April 1, 2022, and cover the Chilliwack and Sea to Sky Natural Resources District, including the traditional unceded territories of the Stó:lō, St’át’imc, Nlaka'pamux, xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish), and Tsleil-Waututh First Nations. The proposed plan is for five years, ending in 2027. 

While the notice was printed in the local newspaper in Hope, along with the draft proposal available online, it does not include a map of specified locations where herbicides such as glyphosate, triclopyr (Garlon, Release) and 2,4-D (Formula 40) will be used. 

The management plan highlights cottonwood, red alder, salmonberry, red elderberry, devil’s club, thimbleberry, salal, fireweed, huckleberry and blueberry as plants which will be targeted by the proposal. All of which, Rose said, Indigenous people have used as medicines and food for thousands of years.

“Our rush to get rid of these, so called, competing species is making our forests more vulnerable to wildfire,”'

SNAP Comment: and tht is how you turn a forest into a plantation...

filed under forestry/herbicides, glyphosate, 2,4-D, triclopyr

Thursday, April 7, 2022

Traditionally-Produced Compost Improves Soil, Outperforms Synthetic Chemical Fertilizers

Field study in India

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Traditionally-Produced Compost Improves Soil, Outperforms Synthetic Chemical Fertilizers

(Beyond Pesticides, March 31, 2022) 'Composts produced using traditional ecological knowledge create healthier, more fertile soil than industrial, chemical-based fertilizers, according to the findings of a recent study published in PLOS Sustainability and Transformation.' Field study in India 

'The study notes that traditional soils maintained their advantages over chemically treated throughout the course of the experiment, and even during a drought period in the middle of study period. '

Thursday, April 7, 2022

(German) Cockroaches Exhibit Resistance to Pesticides at 10x Label Application Rates

No evidence was found that cockroaches have developed widespread resistance to boric acid

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(German) Cockroaches Exhibit Resistance to Pesticides at 10x Label Application Rates  (Beyond Pesticides, March 22, 2022) 'The findings underscore the importance of an integrated approach to cockroach management that recognizes and responds to pest ecology, rather than search for an ever-elusive silver bullet.

This never-exposed laboratory strain of roaches were then exposed to varying levels of commonly used bait insecticides, including fipronil, clothianidin, indoxacarb, abamectin, hydramethylnon, and deltamethrin. Researchers determined lethal doses (LD) that killed 50% of the laboratory strain, as well as the dose that killed 95%.

Scientists then exposed the residential strains to commercial products containing the insecticides listed above. ...Scientists then took it a step further and exposed the cockroaches to ten times the LD95. At this rate, upwards of 80% of deltamethrin-exposed roaches still lived, while with fipronil that rate killed off 20-70%. The clothianidin and indoxacarb exposed roaches exhibited a significant negative correlation between survival time after exposure to 10 x LD95 and mortality, while with those exposed to fipronil and hydramethylnon the correlation was insignificant.

Only abamectin exhibits a knockdown that would suggest a level of effectiveness in a cockroach infestation. However, researchers add caution to that finding by referencing a 2019 study that found rapid increases in abamectin resistance in field settings.

In the 2019 study, researchers tested one active ingredient that was not tested in the present study: boric acid. No evidence was found that cockroaches have developed widespread resistance to boric acid, likely to due its mode of action.

SNAP Comment: Resistance is likely similar in Canada in buildings where monthly treatments are used. A PMRA label search indicates 0 registered insecticides with fipronil, and indoxacarb,17 each with deltamethrin and clothianidin, 19 with abamectin, and 2 with hydramethylnon. 22 products containing boric acid were alse registered. (7 April 2022)

filed under resistance/insecticides

Thursday, April 7, 2022

Producers Warned by EPA that PFAS Is Contaminating Pesticides and Food

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Producers Warned by EPA that PFAS Is Contaminating Pesticides and Food

(Beyond Pesticides, March 29, 2022) Plastic storage barrels contaminated with polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) may be in violation of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), according to an open letter released by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) last month. Manufacturers, producers, processors, distributors, users, and those that dispose of fluorinated High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) containers or other similar plastics that form PFAS as a byproduct were notified in the letter of requirements under federal law. 

filed under Formulants/Inerts /Contaminants

Thursday, April 7, 2022

2022 Clean Fifteen and Dirty dozen List

pesticides in food

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Clean Fifteen™
EWG's 2022 Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce™

also link to download EWG'S 2022 DIRTY DOZEN™ LIST

filed under food

Monday, March 28, 2022

Ingredients of and Lung Damage from Mosquito Coils

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Mosquito Coils: Ingredients of, Lung Damage, and references   (by Allan-Shelly Holland, March 19, 2018 , on Facebook) ·

"Not many people know about it, but the damage done to your lungs by one mosquito coil is equivalent to the damage done by 100 cigarettes." Sandeep Salvi, Chest Research Foundation Director
Burning of one mosquito coil would release the same amount of particulate matter (PM) 2.5 mass as burning 75-137 cigarettes; the emission of formaldehyde from burning one coil can be as high as that released from burning 51 cigarettes.
An unhealthy sleep - how safe are mosquito coils?
Category : General Chemicals
Published by : Data Research Analyst, Worldofchemicals.com
Dangerous Chemicals in Mosquito Coils
The annual worldwide consumption of the four major types of residential insecticide products are -- aerosols, mosquito coils, liquid vaporizers, and vaporizing mats.
Mosquito coils are burned indoors and outdoors in regions like Asia, Africa, and South America. Mosquito coils consist of an insecticide/repellant, organic fillers capable of burning with smoldering, binder, and additives such as synergists, dyes, and fungicide.
Mosquito coil ingredients
Pyrethrum
Pyrethrins
Allethrin
Dibutyl hydroxyl toluene (BHT)
Piperonyl butoxide (PBO)
N-(2-ethylhexyl)-bicyclo-(2,2,1)hept-5-ene-2,3-dicarboximide (MGK 264)
N,N-Diethyl-Meta-Toluamide (DEET)
N,N-Diethyl-Meta-Toluamide (DEET)

DEET is a registered pesticide. It is the most effective, and best studied, insect repellent currently on the market. This substance has a remarkable safety profile after 40 years of worldwide use. It has been approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
Repellents with DEET are used by an estimated 200 million people worldwide each year.
The most common active ingredients in coils are various pyrethroids, such as allethrin, d-allethrin, pynamin forte and ETOC. Octachlorodipropylether (S-2) is sometimes used as a synergist or active ingredient and use of such coils exposes humans to some level of bis-chloromethyl ether (BCME) which is an extremely potent lung carcinogen. Although the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) does not register S-2 for any use, some imported mosquito coils contain this chemical, but their use is illegal in the United States, moreover in places like India S-2 is not banned.
Other compounds, released during the burning of mosquito coils (aldehydes, formaldehydes, fine and ultrafine particles,benzene, benzoapyrene, benzobfluoranthene, benzokfluoranthene are also classified by the U.S. EPA as probable human carcinogens.
Mosquito coils burn for about 8hr without flame and kill or repel mosquitoes. Although they are recommended for outdoor use, or for use in semi-enclosed patios and porches, coils are often used overnight in sleeping quarters.
As a result peoples are exposed to a chemically complex mosquito-coil smoke containing small particles (< 1 µm), metal fumes, and vapors that may reach the alveolar region of the lung.
Burning of one mosquito coil would release the same amount of particulate matter (PM) 2.5 mass as burning 75-137 cigarettes; the emission of formaldehyde from burning one coil can be as high as that released from burning 51 cigarettes.
To avoid exposure from harmful chemically complex mosquito-coil smoke, usage of natural mosquito repellents is one of the best alternative methods.
Studies have shown that the best natural mosquito repellents usually contain more than just one type of oil.
Essential oils used in natural mosquito repellents
Lemon eucalyptus oil
Geranium oil
Soybean oil
Citronella
Fennel
Thyme
Clove oil
Celery extract
Neem oil
Picaridin

Bite Blocker, a repellent that contains geranium, soybean and coconut oil, can repel mosquitoes for up to 3 1/2 hours, longer than any repellent that contains only geranium oil.
Fennel - A small study by researchers at Seoul National University in Korea found that spray mosquito repellent containing 5 per cent fennel oil was 84 per cent effective after 90 minutes and a repellent cream with 8 per cent fennel oil was 70 per cent effective after 90 minutes.
Thyme - In one study, carvacrol and alpha-terpinene, two compounds derived from the essential oil of thyme, were found to have significantly greater repellency than a commercial N,N-Diethyl-Meta-Toluamide (DEET) repellent. The researchers suggest that a spray made with 2 per cent alpha terpinene is a promising natural mosquito repellent.
Picaridin - Picaridin is an insect and acarid repellent in the piperidine chemical family. Piperidines are structural components of piperine, the plant extract from the genus Piper that is also known as pepper. The chemical name is 1-piperidinecarboxylic acid 2-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-ethylpropylester. Picaridin is an odorless synthetic safe mosquito repellent ingredient that has been proven as effective as DEET in studies against mosquitoes, fleas, ticks, and chiggers. It is also known as KBR 3023 or Bayrepel.
Reference
1 Robert I. Krieger, Travis M. Dinoff, Xiaofei Zhang, Octachlorodipropyl Ether (S-2) Mosquito Coils Are Inadequately Studied for Residential Use in Asia and Illegal in the United States , Available from - http://ehp03.niehs.nih.gov/.../info:doi/10.1289/ehp.6177...
FURTHER ARTICLES:

Is a potential health danger smouldering away without us realising?
Environmental health risks and benefits of the use of mosquito coils as malaria prevention and control strategy.

Mosquito coil exposure associated with small cell lung cancer: A report of three cases

Do mosquito coils really work? And are they bad for your health? 

Are mosquito coils making us sick?  

filed under Mosquito control/ mosquito coils


 

Thursday, March 24, 2022

Dicamba Symptomology Community Science Monitoring Report

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Dicamba Symptomology Community Science Monitoring Report  (Dan Scheiman, Ph.D. Bird Conservation Director Audubon Arkansas , November 9, 2020)  13 minutes video. Audubon and volunteers found dicamba poisoning symptoms on native plant in 343 locations across counties in Arkansas including all species in forest reserves, state parks, as well as fields. If a nearby source of dicamba use is not identified, inspectors conclude there is no violation and there is no recourse by the damaged parties, including homeowners. In some counties, all crops not being dicamba resistant were damaged. There may not be much vegetation of any tyoe. that will survive in these areas besides dicamba-resistant crops. Just imagine the effects on birds and the rest of the environment... 

SNAP Comment: Dicamba has now been added to some glyphosate formulations to control glyphosate-resistant weeds. The issue is that dicamba is extremely volatile, and that glyphosate makes it even more so, resulting in widepsread damage to crops, gardens and trees. 

filed under drift/ incidents and dicamba

Thursday, March 24, 2022

New Brunswick Legislative committee calls for more glyphosate restrictions, Greens want full ban

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New Brunswick   Legislative committee calls for more glyphosate restrictions, Greens want full ban   Committee recommends greater spray setbacks, asks N.B. Power to stop using herbicides  (Hadeel Ibrahim, , Nov 03, 2021)  Try as I may, I have been unable to get a link to the original report. 

10. THAT setbacks for aerial spraying be increased from 500 metres to 1 kilometre from dwellings.
11. THAT the government require a spraying setback of 100 metres from protected natural areas.
12. THAT the government require a minimum 100-metre aerial spraying setback from water and wetlands and/or require spray plans that may vary depending on the landscape and the hydrological characteristics of the land.
13. THAT the government ban spraying of pesticides in protected watersheds as designated under the Clean Water Act.
14. THAT the Minister of Natural Resources and Energy Development request of NB Power that it immediately begin phasing out spraying of pesticides under transmission lines.

filed under forestry/ herbicides used in forestry and glyphosate

Thursday, March 24, 2022

How Can We Stop the Import of Food Produced Using Banned Practices in Europe? A European Regulation to Protect the Environment and our Farmers.

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How Can We Stop the Import of Food Produced Using Banned Practices in Europe? A European Regulation to Protect the Environment and our Farmers.

'In a report published in April 2021, the Veblen Institute, the Nicolas Hulot Foundation, and the beef interprofessional organisation INTERBEV raise the urgent need to reform a European trade policy that not only fails to meet its environmental and public health commitments, but also jeopardises the future of its breeders and farmers by distorting competition. Together, they are defending a European regulation on imports, based on a principle of "mirror measures". A reform to be carried out now for adoption in 2022, during the French Presidency of the European Union.'

SNAP Comment: It is my understanding that Canada would pressure the European Union over gmos and glyphosate residues in commodities. 

filed under Legislation/Regulatory/ Europe

Thursday, March 24, 2022

SNAP comments on PMRI_2021-10, Glyphosate

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Wednesday, March 23, 2022

Pollinators and Biodiversity

emphasis on neonicotinoids

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Pollinators and Biodiversity panel. 57 minutes video

'This workshop panel was recorded live on June 8th 2021 as part of the Beyond Pesticides Virtual Forum. The panel is moderated by Joyce Kennedy - People & Pollinators Action Network and featuring: Steve Ellis - Old Mill Honey Company Aimee Code - Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation and Vera Krischik, PhD - Department of Entomology at the St. Paul, University of Minnesota Pollinators are in unrelenting devastating decline.

But it’s not just pollinators. Research has found dramatic drops in overall insect abundance, leading entomologists to speak of an “insect apocalypse.” Various studies have found reductions of up to a factor 60 over the past 40 years –there were 60 times as many insects in some locations in the 1970s. Research shows that insect abundance has declined more than 75% over the last 27 years. The dramatic drop in insect biomass has led to equally dramatic pronunciations from highly respected scientists and entomologists. “We appear to be making vast tracts of land inhospitable to most forms of life, and are currently on course for ecological Armageddon,” says David Goulson, PhD of Sussex University. “If we lose the insects then everything is going to collapse.” It is clear that dramatic changes are needed.'

filed under insects and neonicotinoids

Monday, March 21, 2022

Monoculture Rice Production Outperformed by Traditional Techniques that Integrate Aquatic Animals

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Monoculture Rice Production Outperformed by Traditional Techniques that Integrate Aquatic Animals

(Beyond Pesticides, March 15, 2022) Adding animal diversity to rice paddy farms reduces weed pressure, increases food production, and makes fertilizer use more efficient, according to a study published late last month in the journal eLife. ... The researchers used no herbicide in any of the experimental plots, and there is evidence from the diverse plots that no herbicide use would be needed based on the weed pressure alleviated.

Monday, March 21, 2022

EPA Overlooks Glyphosate and Roundup Ingredients’ Cancer, DNA Damage, and Multigenerational Effects

glyphosate

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EPA Overlooks Glyphosate and Roundup Ingredients’ Cancer, DNA Damage, and Multigenerational Effects

(Beyond Pesticides, March 10, 2022) 'Glyphosate and glyphosate-based herbicides (GBH) like Roundup® induce DNA damage and alter biological mechanisms (gene regulatory microRNAs miRNAs or miRs) associated with cancer development. According to the study published in Toxicological Sciences, DNA damage mainly occurs through oxidative stress from GBH exposure. Moreover, DNA damage and other biological mechanisms that cause carcinogenicity (cancer) occur at doses assumed “safe” by pesticide regulators such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

These findings show that glyphosate and Roundup score positive in various tests of carcinogenicity... in a living animal (rat) that is accepted as a surrogate for human health effects. In my view, this strengthens the argument that exposure to Roundup herbicides can lead to the type of cancer suffered by the plaintiffs in many of the court cases – non-Hodgkin lymphoma.”

 For the first time, this study demonstrates epigenetic changes in DNA, proteins, and small RNA profiles in the liver of organisms exposed to glyphosate and Roundup formula MON 52276.

filed under glyphosate and cancer

Monday, March 21, 2022

Pesticide Drift or Chemical Trespass Continue Uncontrolled, Despite Successful Litigation

California case

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Pesticide Drift or Chemical Trespass Continue Uncontrolled, Despite Successful Litigation

(Beyond Pesticides, March 18, 2022) A 2020 lawsuit related to pesticide drift was resolved on March 8, 2022 in San Joaquin (California) Superior Court with the finding that Alpine Helicopter Services, which specializes in pesticide applications for government and tourism entities, had violated pesticide drift laws and endangered public health and safety. The court further found Alpine liable for damage related to its actions, though penalties in the case, brought by California state prosecutors and the California Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR), have yet to be determined. The case exposes a handful of the many instances of pesticide drift, also known as “chemical trespass,” that occur every year in the U.S. Prairiesun Organic chemical Trespass Report gives an idea of the process and difficulty to 'prove' damages. (South Dakota)

SNAP Comment: Almost every year, I get calls from people whose property was affected by pesticide drift. Some were in urban settings, others on the farm. Trying to fight these battles in court is difficult and leaves victims exhausted and, generally, To establish damages, one needs to calculate the cost of everything lost or having to be sold at a lower price (i.e. organic versus conventional). This could include veterinary costs for replacement cost for livestock. It has been close to impossible to 'prove'  or cost health effects. 

filed under Pesticide Drift/incidents

Friday, March 18, 2022

Manitoba s plan to amend cosmetic pesticide legislation receives thumbs-up from associations

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Manitoba's plan to amend cosmetic pesticide legislation receives thumbs-up from associations    Substantial savings for municipalities, says AMM president  (Nathan Liewicki, CBC News, March 14, 2022)

'He says the decision to rely on the Health Canada Pest Management Regulation Agency (PMRA) will protect the health of the province's citizens and its landscapes...The legislation would allow the use of Health Canada-approved cosmetic pesticides in low-risk areas like boulevards, sidewalks, rights-of-way and fairgrounds.  "I do think it's a step back. I think it's a step back for climate change," Naylor said. "I don't think that any Manitobans want more chemicals in our water and in our air."'

Proposed changes to pesticide law could leave lawn care businesses scrambling   (By Danton Unger, CTVNewsWinnipeg.ca Editorial Producer, March 14, 2022) 

SNAP Comments: supporters of pesticide use such as the Manitoba Nursery Landscape Association akways fight pesticide bylaws .Certainly, relying on the PMRA isn't even close to protect the healh of anything. I suspect that all pesticide use on sidewalks, streets, rights-of-way , gravel areas including parking can be easily replaced with steam weeding. More info at weeds. Weeds are best fought with cultural methods of improving soil quality. Manitoba lawn care companies seemingly fail in this regards.

filed under bylaws/provincial under Manitoba

Friday, March 18, 2022

Invasive Species Centre resources

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today I came across the site of the Invasive Species Centre in Sault Sainte-Marie, Ontario. There is mention of chemical control of many species but usually in the form of painting a cut trunk or wicking in small areas. There is extensive information of each species and extensive information of all control methods previously tried including biological. 

Lo and behold, I have been trying to find a source of biological beetle control for Purple Loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) and found it on their fact sheet

Also info on European buckthorn and several other invasive plants, as well as invasive insects,fish and invertebrates, aquatic plants and pathogens.

filed under alternatives/weeds, insects

Wednesday, March 16, 2022

How I learned to love weeds – and why you should, too

I once fought against the dandelions, nettles and docks that infiltrated my garden. But now I know they are essential, I’m glad I lost the battle

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How I learned to love weeds – and why you should, too

I once fought against the dandelions, nettles and docks that infiltrated my garden. But now I know they are essential, I’m glad I lost the battle  ( Alys Fowler forThe Guardian, 16 march 2022)

A different perspective. British article. All species may not apply here. Also there is a difference between imported noxious weeds and the native species we consider weeds. 
'Of course, weeds need to be managed, but there is another side to them that shouldn’t be overlooked. Many weeds are excellent for the environment because they feed others. Their flowers feed many insects; their leaves feed caterpillars, aphids and other soft-bodied things that in turn are the feed for other insects, birds and mammals. Come autumn, their seed feeds many wild birds. These unwanted plants support all manner of wildlife. There is growing evidence that even the ones considered noxious to agriculture – spear thistle, field thistle, common ragwort, curled dock and broad-leaved dock, which are controlled by the 1959 Weeds Act – are actually very good for nature.'

Monday, March 14, 2022

Study Confirms Children’s Exposure to Mosquito Pesticides Increases Risk of Respiratory Disease

synthetic pyrethroids

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Study Confirms Children’s Exposure to Mosquito Pesticides Increases Risk of Respiratory Disease

(Beyond Pesticides, March 3, 2022) Children’s exposure to synthetic pyrethroid insecticides, particularly during the course of mosquito control operations, is associated with increased occurrence of certain respiratory diseases and allergic outcomes, finds research published in the journal Thorax late last month. 

SNAP Comment: Synthetic pyrethroids, especially permethrin and pyrethrin are currently the most commonly used insecticide by consumers (respectively 281 and 335 domestic products) other than the imidacloprid used for fleas and ticks for pets. They are in most insect dusts as well as sprayable products like Raid and flea/tick collars. Pyrethroid poisoning is also the most commonly reported form of poisoning at the U.S.Poison control Center.

filed under Pyrethrins, children, respiratory

Monday, March 14, 2022

Pesticide Literacy 101: Truth & Advertising

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Pesticide Literacy 101: Truth & Advertising (Beyond Pesticides, 2021 annual forum)

55 minute video. Caroline Cox will discuss basic overview of health and environmental effects of pesticides, the underlying pesticide law, and regulatory authority. Sarah Evans, PhD will discuss health effects of toxic chemicals and what individuals can do to protect their own health, as well as how to advocate for healthier policies in their local communities. Melinda Hemmelgarn, MS, RD will discuss media literacy as it applies to pesticide narratives, framing, and messaging. Anyone can subscribe to Beyond Pesticide youtube channel. 

filed under Industry shenaniganshealthchildren

Wednesday, March 9, 2022

SNAP and Nature Regina presentations to Regina City Council on Motion to Regulate the Non-essential (Cosmetic) Use of Pesticides

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Tuesday, March 8, 2022

Mosquito Resistance to Pesticides Continues to Grow

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Mosquito Resistance to Pesticides Continues to Grow

(Beyond Pesticides, February 24, 2022) Widespread, intensive pesticide use for mosquito control has allowed genetic mutations to persist among mosquito populations, causing subsequent resistance to future chemical exposure. According to a study published in Scientific Reports, two common species of female mosquitoes learned to evade pesticides following non-fatal exposure through smell. More concerning is the survival rate of these pre-exposed mosquitoes, as it is more than double that of unexposed mosquitoes. The study focused on female Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciastus mosquitoes that researchers exposed to a sublethal dose of five pesticide compounds. 

filed under resistance/ insecticides

Tuesday, March 8, 2022

Fighting Chemical Trespass

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Fighting Chemical Trespass   (Beyond Pesticides 2021 conference, Mar 5, 2022) Panel discussion, 1 hour video. Practical life examples, difficulties of proving damage. Link to background documents including 

What to Do in a Pesticide Emergency
Dicamba Symptomology Community Science MonitoringReport
NOP Instruction: Responding to Results from Pesticide Testing
Chemical Trespass Report
Dicamba: Drifting Towards Disaster - Presented by Dan Scheiman PhD

filed under Pesticide Drift/incidents

Sunday, March 6, 2022

Canadian Wheat Tests Positive for 3,162 ppb of Carcinogenic Glyphosate Weed Kill

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Canadian Wheat Tests Positive for 3,162 ppb of Carcinogenic Glyphosate Weed Killer  ( Zen Honeycutt, Moms Across Americaa, 16 February 2022) 

'.Samples of wheat bran, whole wheat flour, and unbleached all-purpose flour from a Winnipeg supermarket. (first and second section of results) All were produced from Canadian wheat. The second set of samples (third chart)  are from a research project being done at a farm in Manitoba.

Considering that the CA EPA’s Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) has determined a maximum daily intake level of 1100 ug per day, 2,266 ppb (equivalent to ug), as found in Canadian wheat tilled samples, is comparatively quite alarming. Feeding one’s baby a piece of toast or breakfast cereal with these levels of glyphosate is a disturbing idea, and one likely to lead to chronic health issues.' also tables and discussion of  health effects.'

filed under glyphosate and food.

Friday, March 4, 2022

A Synthesis of Human-related Avian Mortality in Canada

Synthèse des sources de mortalité aviaire d’origine anthropique au Canada

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A Synthesis of Human-related Avian Mortality in Canada
 (Synthèse des sources de mortalité aviaire d’origine anthropique au Canada)
 (Calvert, A. M. et al, Avian Conservation and Ecology, vol 8 no 2, art 11, 2013) This puts bird mortality from pesticides used in agriculture in 6th position with over 1 million birds a year killed. 

filed under Birds

Friday, March 4, 2022

Use of fertilizer and pesticides by Canadians

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Use of fertilizer and pesticides by Canadians (Statistics Canada)

Table with use every 2 years from 2013. In the box under geography, you can get stats per province.

filed under Pesticide use and sales

Thursday, March 3, 2022

Review Provides New Insight into How Pesticide Exposure Disrupts Bee Gut Microbiome

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Review Provides New Insight into How Pesticide Exposure Disrupts Bee Gut Microbiome

(Beyond Pesticides, February 16, 2022) 'Pesticide exposure disturbs the gut microbiome of social bees, leading to a range of alterations that could affect fitness in the wild, finds a major literature review recently published by researchers at the University of Ottawa, Canada.

Studies showed that pesticide use can disturb and shift the abundance of certain microbes in the bee gut microbiome, but rarely are these microbes completely eliminated. In general, researchers found declines in Bifidobacteriales and Lactobacillus bacteria to be the most common shifts observed.

Pesticides induced disturbances primarily in one of two ways – either directly harming microbes, and indirectly harming the host (bee) health and subsequently shifting the microbiome.Researchers cite glyphosate as an example of a pesticide that directly harms the growth of certain gut microbes.

The literature review also found that, regarding the impacts of exposure, the duration of pesticide exposure was more important than the amount of pesticide to which a bee was exposed. '

filed under Bee Die-Off

Thursday, March 3, 2022

Herbicide resistance keeps on rising

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Herbicide resistance keeps on rising
Mother Nature keeps outsmarting the available crop protection products   (Gord Leathers, Manitoba Cooperators, 1 March 2022)

'Increasing the seeding rate did have an impact. In one year, they reduced kochia biomass by 74 per cent. Geddes said the effect of the rotation was almost like adding another effective herbicide mode of action into the tank. They also hit the weed with a slightly different rotation, changing the crop life cycle by using winter wheat instead of spring wheat. Winter wheat is already well established by the time kochia is getting started and it’s harvested before the kochia can set seed. There are also issues with downy brome in Alberta. Both waterhemp and Palmer amaranth have been documented in Manitoba and both are capable of glyphosate resistance.

filed under resistance/ herbicide and alternative/individual weed

Thursday, March 3, 2022

EPA Needs to End the Legacy of Toxic Wood Preservatives Now

reviews status and risks of pentachlorophenol, creosote and arsenical wood preservatives.

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EPA Needs to End the Legacy of Toxic Wood Preservatives Now

reviews status and risks of pentachlorophenol, creosote and arsenical wood preservatives and call for action (US)

(Beyond Pesticides, February 22, 2022) 'Regulation of toxic chemicals must recognize the reality that, “The cocktail of chemical pollution that pervades the planet now threatens the stability of global ecosystems upon which humanity depends,” as stated by The Guardian.'

filed under treated wood

Thursday, March 3, 2022

Cancer rates are higher, closer to golf courses and other sources of carcinogens, in Newfoundland.

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Cancer rates are higher, closer to golf courses and other sources of carcinogens, in Newfoundland.

Additional burden of cancers due to environmental carcinogens in Newfoundland and Labrador: a spatial analysis  (Rahman et al, Environmental Health Review, 13 November 2020)  For ultraviolet rays , arsenic, disinfection by-products , and agricultural chemicals, the RR (95% CI) were 1.5 (1.4–1.6), 1.25 (1.03–1.51), 1.8 (1.67–1.94), and 1.49 (1.3–1.7), respectively. 

 'Agricultural chemicals are heavily used on golf courses, with four to seven times greater than the recommended doses meant for any agricultural farms (Feldman, 2020; Golf ventures, 2019).'

filed under cancer

Thursday, March 3, 2022

An overview of the Alberta Invasive Species Council and their biocontrol release program in Alberta

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An overview of the Alberta Invasive Species Council and their biocontrol release program in Alberta ( PCAP- Prairie Conservation Action Plan-  presentation. March 2, 2022) 54 minute video available on PCAP's you tube channel.

review of what invasive species are and details on weed bio-control programs especially Leafy Spurge. Dalmatian Toadflax, and Knapweeds. Their March 2022 conference will have a speaker presenting on biocontrol of Tansy and Ox-Eye Daisy. 

The Alberta Invasive Species Council have lots of resources including photo fact sheets for all species classified as invasive in Alberta and their biocontrol program. Links to free EDDMapS (Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System) Pro app  and EDDMapS app (citizen-science-based).from Bugwood Apps in Alberta. Data submitted through the EDDMapS Pro app can be summarized and used to inform future prioritization and management strategies, more effectively utilizing limited resources.

filed under alternatives/weeds

Thursday, March 3, 2022

Plastic Sports Bottles Leach Thousands of Chemicals, including a Common Insect Repellent

DEET and many dishwashing chemicals as well as plastic components

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 Plastic Sports Bottles Leach Thousands of Chemicals, including a Common Insect Repellent   (Beyond Pesticides, February 17, 2022) 

(The insect repellent) 'DEET was confirmed to be present in every plastic bottle tested. Scientists indicate that DEET’s presence is likely a result another chemical with a similar chemical structure to DEET. In particular, the plasticizer material laurolactam is implicated. Either the plasticizer was produced with impurities that mimic DEET, or it was transformed into DEET  in the dishwasher through a chemical reaction with other materials in the plastic bottles.   The scientists opine that the identification of DEET may in fact be the source of ubiquitous DEET detection in the environment. A phenomenon that has long been ascribed to its use as a repellent, the widespread presence of DEET in the natural world by chemical happenstance may be yet another side-effect of a world where chemical pollution has exceeded the safe limits for humanity.

filed under food and water 

Thursday, March 3, 2022

Did Ontario Golf Courses reduce pesticide use with Integrated Pest Management?

the answer is mostly NO

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Did Ontario Golf Courses reduce pesticide use with Integrated Pest Management? (Prevent Cancer Now, November 2020)

'Fast forward 10 years: Prevent Cancer Now asked the Ontario Government and the IPM Council of Canada whether or not pesticide use had decreased on Ontario golf courses. Neither could answer.

As a result Prevent Cancer Now examined reports from 16 higher-end Ontario golf courses to determine whether use of pesticides had declined

Key findings of the study include:

  • overall, use of herbicides, fungicides and insecticides increased between 2010 and 2017 (see bar chart above);
  • three fungicides, three herbicides and all insecticides used on the studied Ontario golf courses have been identified as “highly hazardous” by international authorities (e.g., World Health Organization, European Union and US EPA);
  • a small number of courses fared better than others, applying one fifth the amount of pesticides (measured as equivalent hectares treated) compared with high users (see line graph below);

SNAP Comment: For all practical purposes, the answer is mostly NO. Why? Likely because of who the IPM Council or Canada is (industry associations and groups committed to having IPM as standard) and their widely used faulty definition of IPM used. An appropriate definition of IPM prioritizes non-toxic methods first rather than considering chemical pesticides as a same level option.

filed under lawn/turf and IPM

Thursday, March 3, 2022

Deadly Fungus Resistant to Fungicide Jumps from Farms to People, as Human Pathogen Spreads

Scientists focused their research on Aspergillus fumigatus, a common mold that can infect humans and cause aspergillosis.

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Deadly Fungus Resistant to Fungicide Jumps from Farms to People, as Human Pathogen Spreads

(Beyond Pesticides, February 23, 2022) Fungicide use in agriculture is driving the spread of multi-fungicide resistant human pathogens, finds a recent study conducted by scientists at the University of Georgia. Scientists focused their research on Aspergillus fumigatus, a common mold that can infect humans and cause aspergillosis. Although some have problems with mild sensitivity to the fungus, virulent infections called invasive aspergillosis can occur in immunocompromised individuals and are on the rise. Cases of invasive aspergillosis increased 3% per annum between 2000 and 2013, and roughly 300,000 worldwide are diagnosed each year.

Of 700 A. fumigatus samples collected, nearly 20% (123) displayed some level of resistance to the commonly used azole fungicide tebuconazole. Twelve of the 123 were highly resistant at clinically relevant levels for human health care. No samples taken from organic sites contained resistant fungi.... Sure enough, the azole-resistant strains also displayed resistance to methyl benzimidazole carbamate (MBC) fungicides like carbendazim, and quinone outside inhibitors (Qol) like azoxystrobin. ...“The strains that are from the environment and from people are very closely related to each other,” study co-author Marin T. Brewer, PhD, said.'

filed under resistance and Immune/infection

Monday, February 28, 2022

Justice Pesticides is a European group with a lot of information on pesticides from research studies to legal cases.

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Justice Pesticides is a European group with a lot of information on pesticides from research studies to legal cases.

filed under Resource links/International

Thursday, February 10, 2022

One in three Americans have detectable levels of toxic weedkiller, study finds

Overall, the amount of 2,4-D applied in agriculture increased 67% between 2012 and 2020

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One in three Americans have detectable levels of toxic weedkiller, study finds  
(Nina Lakhani, The guardian,  9 February 2022)

'Human exposure to 2,4-D has substantially risen despite a multitude of health and environmental concerns. 

As the pesticide grew in popularity among farmers and gardeners, so did evidence of human exposure, rising from a low of 17% in 2001-02 to a high of almost 40% a decade later.

Exposure to high levels of 2,4-D, an ingredient of Agent Orange used against civilians during the Vietnam war, has been linked to cancers including leukemia in children, birth defects and reproductive problems among other health issues... While little is known about the impact of low-level exposure to the herbicide, it does disrupt the endocrine system. Link to the study Environmental Health,

Overall, the amount of 2,4-D applied in agriculture increased 67% between 2012 and 2020, but its use will almost certainly grow sharply over the next decade due to the widespread use of the controversial weedkiller Enlist Duo – a relatively newly approved combo (2,4-D and glyphosate) for genetically modified crops. 

SNAP Comment: In Canada the PMRA currently registers 142 pesticides containing 2,4-D.

Thursday, February 10, 2022

Study Adds to Growing Body of Research Linking Common Lung Disease (COPD) to Work-Related Pesticide Exposure

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Study Adds to Growing Body of Research Linking Common Lung Disease (COPD) to Work-Related Pesticide Exposure

(Beyond Pesticides, February 3, 2022) A study published in the journal Thorax finds lifetime occupational (work-related) exposure to pesticides increases incidents of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

filed under respiratory

Thursday, February 10, 2022

Interplay Between Pesticides and Climate Change Has Driven Down Dragonfly Populations

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Interplay Between Pesticides and Climate Change Has Driven Down Dragonfly Populations

(Beyond Pesticides, February 2, 2022) 'Over the last 40 years, dragonfly species have declined in the United States due to an interplay between increasing pesticide use and rising temperatures from climate change, according to a recent study published in Ecological Applications... Review of the data found that out of 104 dragonfly species, each species experienced an average of 30% quadrant loss compared to previously occupied quadrants within the last 40 years. Researchers indicate this is likely an underestimate.

The authors conclude that “climate change interacts with recent, rapid rises in pesticide applications to increase dragonfly and damselfly extinction risks, a clear demonstration that multistressor frameworks are vital for identifying risks related to global change.”'

ffiled under insects

Sunday, February 6, 2022

Moving Canada off the toxic treadmill of key chemicals laws

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Moving Canada off the toxic treadmill of key chemicals laws
(Prevent Cancer Now, 3 February 3, 2022)

nice article with Canadian content and lots of Canadian links from my friend Meg Sears. Identifies regulations and changes that have to be made to reduce pesticide use and work towards sustainability.

Saturday, February 5, 2022

Impacts of Neonics in New York Water Their Use and Threats to the State’s Aquatic Ecosystems

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Impacts of Neonics in New York Water Their Use and Threats to the State’s Aquatic Ecosystems (Pierre Mineau; Pierre Mineau Consulting)

Impacts of Neonics in New York Water Their Use and Threats to the State’s Aquatic Ecosystems (Pierre Mineau; Pierre Mineau Consulting, probably 2019)     'Neonics now frequently appear in New York surface waters at levels expected to cause significant harm to the state’s aquatic ecosystems...Detected levels of imidacloprid alone in New York streams exceed levels at which deleterious effects on stream ecology were observed in other research. The probability that imidacloprid and other neonics are causing ecosystem-wide damage in New York is very high. Substantial reductions in outdoor neonic use are needed to mitigate further damage... Water sampling for other neonics has been sparse, but given the high runoff potential for clothianidin' (only approved in NY for seed treatment) 'and thiamethoxam (both greater than imidacloprid), and their significant use in New York, regular monitoring for these chemicals is needed. ' SNAP Comments: The article discusses in detail what benchmark values are, how they are established and what they should be. Also extensive list of references.

filed under water

Friday, February 4, 2022

Common Antimicrobial Pesticides Linked to Altered Gut Microbe Function

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Common Antimicrobial Pesticides Linked to Altered Gut Microbe Function

(Beyond Pesticides, January 25, 2022) Research at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill identifies how triclosan (TCS), an antimicrobial agent used in many household products, impacts the microbial communities in the gut, causing inflammation. According to the study published in Nature Communications, triclosan worsens the effects of ulcerative colitis, an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), through the retention of harmful bacteria.   

SNAP Comments: Astounding that no one cosnidered that an antimicrobial pesticide added to commonly used consumer products would have an effect on gut or other bacteria. One has to wonder...' "Health Canada has approved 64 marketed drug products with a DIN that contain triclosan. These are not all hand sanitizers ― some are soaps, hand washes and toothpastes," a Health Canada spokesperson said in an email'. (What happened to triclosan? A lingering legacy of the hyper-hygiene era. Kelly Crowe,CBC, 20 April, 2019)

filed under antibacterials and digestive tract

Friday, February 4, 2022

Increased Accumulation of Disinfectant Chemicals in the Body during the Pandemic Threatens Health, Despite Available Alternatives

zbout quaternary ammonium compounds (QUATs or QACs)

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Increased Accumulation of Disinfectant Chemicals in the Body during the Pandemic Threatens Health, Despite Available Alternatives

(Beyond Pesticides, February 1, 2022) A study published in Environmental Science and Technology finds that concentrations of quaternary ammonium compounds (QUATs or QACs) in the human body have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, raising health and safety concerns. QACs include a variety of chemicals in personal care, pharmaceutical, and medical products used as disinfectants, sanitizers, antimicrobials. However, over the past 70 years, large-scale production and use of these compounds led to accumulation in the environment, including surface water, sediment, and soil. Previously, researchers thought most QACs lack the potential to bioaccumulate,  as the chemicals are highly water-soluble, while dermal and oral absorption rates are low. However, emerging evidence demonstrates that specific QACs bioaccumulate in blood and other body tissues and can cause a range of toxic effects.  The results show 15 out of the 18 QACs are detectable in blood samples, with QAC concentrations significantly higher during the pandemic than prior to it. The main routes of exposure include diet, inhalation, ingestion, or the skin. '

filed under antibacterials and body burdens

Friday, February 4, 2022

Your Garden and Town Landscapes Are the Change that Pollinators Need, Study Finds

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Your Garden and Town Landscapes Are the Change that Pollinators Need, Study Finds

(Beyond Pesticides, January 28, 2022)  British study. 'small urban gardens and greenspaces are actually some of the most pollinator-friendly resources. The study notes that that several factors influence how well these resources provide food for pollinators, most important among which are pollinator-friendly management practices.' Article includes lots of resources to create such oases. SNAP Comment: I would like to add that buying bedding plants which have not previously been treated with neonicotinoids is also important so ask, and buy from sources that provide neonic-free plants.

filed under insects

Thursday, February 3, 2022

Topic: Dr. Pierre Mineau | More powerful insecticides, declining insect populations, and bats. What could go wrong?

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Topic: Dr. Pierre Mineau | More powerful insecticides, declining insect populations, and bats. What could go wrong?
Time: Feb 02, 2022 13:30 Eastern Time (US and Canada) Presentation to the Canadian Association for the Club of Rome

interesting presentation reviewing the history of pesticide registration and ending with direct and indirect effects of pesticides on birds and bats. Link to four background documents on neonicotinoid effects on aquatic organisms, on bats, on birds and in water.

filed under neonicotinoids, and wildlife/birds and mammals

Thursday, February 3, 2022

SAFE FOOD MATTERS WINS GLYPHOSATE COURT CASE!

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SAFE FOOD MATTERS WINS GLYPHOSATE COURT CASE! (Safe food Matters, 2 February 2022)    The Federal Court of Appeal has issued a decision in favour of Safe Food Matters in a court case concerning the pesticide glyphosate.

The decision remits the matter back to the Pest Management Regulatory Agency for reconsideration, and offers strong guidance to PMRA to avoid “the endless merry-go-round” of court applications and reconsiderations.  In 2017, Safe Food Matters (and others) filed objections to PMRA’s decision RVD2017-01 to re-register glyphosate in Canada, and PMRA rejected the objections in 2019 with a form letter and dismissive reasons. Safe Food Matters filed in Federal Court, lost, then appealed. 

The win means a review panel could still be struck to review RVD2017-01 and recommend that it be confirmed, reversed or varied.   Link to the Appeals court decision in link.

filed uder glyphosate and legal/.litigation/Canada

Monday, January 24, 2022

Chemical Exposure Monitoring Documents Widespread Pesticide Exposure to People and Pets

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Chemical Exposure Monitoring Documents Widespread Pesticide Exposure to People and Pets

(Beyond Pesticides, January 18, 2021) 'A study published in Environmental Science & Technology adds to the growing body of scientific research verifying the use of silicone devices as an effective tool for biomonitoring and disease prognosis, finding widespread exposure to people and pets... However, dogs develop comparable anthropomorphic (human-like) diseases (e.g., cancer, organ damage) from susceptibility to the same environmental contaminants, but at a much quicker pace. Therefore, this research highlights the significance of identifying chemicals associated with diseases that are common across multiple species over longer disease latency periods.

The results find over 70 percent of silicone samples detect the presence of multiple pesticides detectable, such as insecticides, including permethrinfipronil, and N, N diethyl-meta-toluamide (DEET) (a highly toxic insect repellent and synergist). Both DEET and fipronil are detectable in 100 percent of human and dog silicone devices, with DEET concentrations in silicone device samples associated with chemical levels in urine. Due to the use of fipronil as flea and tick treatment, participants reporting recent flea/tick treatments have higher levels of fipronil in both silicone and urine samples.'

SNAP Comment: A PMRA label search shows fipronil is not and has not been sold in Canada. There are 250 DEET products registered and 353 products containing permethrin.

filed under Monitoring Pesticides

Monday, January 24, 2022

Global Chemical Pollution Exceeds Safe Limits for Humanity

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Global Chemical Pollution Exceeds Safe Limits for Humanity

(Beyond Pesticides, January 21, 2022) The bottom-line conclusion of a recent study is that global chemical pollution has now exceeded a safe limit for humanity. As reported by The Guardian, “The cocktail of chemical pollution that pervades the planet now threatens the stability of global ecosystems upon which humanity depends.” Published in Environmental Science & Technology, the research paper asserts that the creation and deployment (into the materials stream and environment) of so many “novel entities” (synthetic chemicals) is happening at a pace that eclipses human ability to assess and monitor them. The study team calls this exceedance of the “planetary boundary” of such chemical pollution “the point at which human-made changes to the Earth push it outside the stable environment of the last 10,000 years.” 

Monday, January 24, 2022

Hazardous Synthetic Pyrethroid Insecticides Subject of Lawsuit Against EPA

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Hazardous Synthetic Pyrethroid Insecticides Subject of Lawsuit Against EPA

(Beyond Pesticides, January 19, 2022) After registering over 300 products containing synthetic pyrethroid pesticides within the last six years, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has done nothing to safeguard endangered species from toxic exposure to these chemicals, despite legal requirement to do so. This dereliction of duty is set to be the subject of a new lawsuit from the Center for Biological Diversity, which announced its intent to sue EPA

filedunder legal/litigation

Monday, January 17, 2022

Neonicotinoids Pass Through Aphids, Contaminating Honeydew and Killing off Pest Predators

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Neonicotinoids Pass Through Aphids, Contaminating Honeydew and Killing off Pest Predators

(Beyond Pesticides, January 6, 2022) Seeds treated with neonicotinoid insecticides contaminate honeydew, often the biggest source of food for pest predators, according to recent research published in the journal Environmental Pollution... But there is another systemic effect that is not included in that picture, and in monoculture crops, (honeydew) could be the biggest source of carbohydrates for beneficial pest predators “This rich carbohydrate source is a common food for many beneficial insects, including pollinators, such as bees and flies, and some natural enemies of pests, such as ants, wasps and beetles,” said John Tooker, PhD, coauthor of a recent literature review published in Biological Reviews. “Honeydew often is more abundant than nectar in agroecosystems.” 

Researchers found that concentrations of the neonicotinoid clothianidin (the chemical tested by scientists, as it is the immediate breakdown product of the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam), are 9 to 11 times higher in aphid honeydew derived from plants that were seed treated with neonicotinoids (at ~35-45 parts per billion), compared to those untreated. Importantly, however, aphids from untreated blocks also had neonicotinoids in their honeydew (at ~1.5-6 ppb). Researchers indicate that this was either from prior plantings on the plot of land chosen, or from runoff from nearby applications causing contamination in the untreated plot.  The results also reveal that pest predators die off much faster when eating contaminated honeydew. The pesticides identified as particularly problematic for this route of exposure are generally those the researchers indicate have systemic properties.  

SNAPComment: There are currently 16 PMRA registered pesticides containing thiamethoxam in Canada, and 16 containing clothianidin. Many more contain other neonicotinoids.

filed under neonicotinoids and wildlife/insects

Monday, January 17, 2022

Banned Pesticides in Well Water Linked to Declines in Kidney Function

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Banned Pesticides in Well Water Linked to Declines in Kidney Function

(Beyond Pesticides, January 12, 2022) Well water in agricultural regions of Sri Lanka is contaminated with highly hazardous insecticides and associated with a decline in kidney function, according to research published in npj Clean Water this month. 

Of the wells sampled, 68% were found to contain pesticides. Further, every well where pesticides were detected had at least one pesticide recorded above global drinking water guidelines. The chemicals found were also some of the most toxic pesticides to ever be sold, including the organochlorine insecticides DDT/DDE, propanil, and endosulfan, and the organophosphate diazinon. None of these chemicals are permitted for use in Europe or the United States, and some like endosulfan are being phased out globally through the Stockholm Convention.

The study found that individuals reporting drinking well water during their lifetimes had glomerular filtration rate (a measurement of kidney health) that was significantly lower on average (6.7) than other individuals who never drank well water, after accounting for differences in age and sex. 

SNAP Comment: I don't know of many well water contamination studies in Canada. There are currently no PMRA registered products containing DDT/DDE (down from 55), propanil  (down from 7), endosulfan (down from 16) in Canada and 5 (down from 184)  diazinon products (2 commercial and 3 in ear tags). 

filed under kidney and industry shenanigans/Interference with Research and Research Publication

Monday, January 17, 2022

Household Pesticide Use Harms Infant Motor Skill Development

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Household Pesticide Use Harms Infant Motor Skill Development

(Beyond Pesticides, January 5, 2022) Household pesticide use is associated with harmful impacts to infant motor development, according to a study published late last year in the journal Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology. As with other pollutants in society, low-income, people of color communities are disproportionately in contact with toxic pesticides, resulting in exposures that can start early, and affect health over the course of one’s lifetime. '“In adjusted models, infants whose mothers reported household use of rodent or insect pesticides had 1.30 (95% CI 1.05, 1.61) times higher expected gross motor scores than infants in households with no reported household pesticide use, with higher scores indicating decreasing gross motor performance,” the study indicates. Household pesticide use over the last decade has generally shifted away from the use of older organophosphate chemistries to the use of synthetic pyrethroid insecticides. But this switch has not resulted in safer exposures; a growing body of literature is finding that synthetic pyrethroids can cause a range of adverse health impacts, particularly in children.'

filed under children and pyrethrins

Monday, January 17, 2022

Common Home Fumigation Pesticide Associated with Increased Greenhouse Gas Emissions

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Common Home Fumigation Pesticide Associated with Increased Greenhouse Gas Emissions

(Beyond Pesticides, January 11, 2022) A study finds that the pesticide sulfuryl fluoride, used for insect (i.e., termites, bedbugs, cockroaches, etc.) fumigation treatments, increases greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, according to the report, “Termite Fumigation in California Is Fueling the Rise of a Rare Greenhouse Gas.” . However, researchers have identified concentrations of sulfuryl fluoride in the atmosphere due to the chemical’s long half-life and greenhouse warming potential (GWP). The California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 does not list sulfuryl fluoride emissions as a GHG risk. Therefore, the researchers note, “This work emphasizes the importance of considering sulfuryl fluoride SO2F2 in state and national greenhouse gas inventories and emissions reduction strategies.”

SNAP Comment: There are currently 2 PMRA registered sulfuryl fluoride products in Canada used in structural fumigation for stored product pests, mostly food. 

Monday, January 17, 2022

Direct pesticide exposure of insects in nature conservation areas in Germany

a buffer of at least 2 km is needed to avoid contamination.

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 Direct pesticide exposure of insects in nature conservation areas in Germany  (Carsten A. Brühl et al; Scientific Reports,16 December 2021)

In total, residues of 47 current use pesticides were detected, and insect samples were on average contaminated with 16.7 pesticides. Residues of the herbicides metolachlor-S, prosulfocarb and terbuthylazine, and the fungicides azoxystrobin and fluopyram were recorded at all sites. The neonicotinoid thiacloprid was detected in 16 of 21 nature conservation areas, most likely due to final use before an EU-wide ban. The individual chemicals reflect sales volume of each.  A change in residue mixture composition was noticeable due to higher herbicide use in spring and increasing fungicide applications in summer. The number of substances of recorded residues is related to the proportion of agricultural production area in a radius of 2000 m. Therefore, a drastic pesticide reduction in large buffers around nature conservation areas is necessary to avoid contamination of their insect fauna.   see also Insects in Nature Preserves Contaminated with Over a Dozen Pesticides (Beyond Pesticides, January 13, 2022) 

SNAP Comment: As mentioned in the article, the higher chemical detection reflects volume of sales so a similarly designed study in other locations would have to reflect pesticide use and persistence in the area. There are currently 32 PMRA registered pesticide products containing metolachlor in Canada, 0 present or historical containing prosulfocarb, 0 present or historical containing terbuthylazine,  44 (down from 49) containing azoxystrobin, 18 containing fluopyram and 4 containing the neonicotinoid thiacloprid. 

filed under insects and mixtures

Wednesday, January 12, 2022

Silence of the Clams—Study Highlights the Threat of Multiple Pesticide Stressors to Bivalves

forestry pesicides tested but not glyphosate

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“Silence of the Clams”—Study Highlights the Threat of Multiple Pesticide Stressors to Bivalves

(Beyond Pesticides, January 4, 2021) Chronic exposure to pesticides used in conventional forestry operations runoff and harm soft shell clams, according to a recent study published in Science of the Total Environment, entitled “The silence of the clams: Forestry registered pesticides as multiple stressors on soft-shell clams. Rather than focusing on the impact of a single chemical, researchers analyzed the combined effects of several pesticides.

The pesticides tested included various combinations of atrazine, hexazinone, indaziflam, and bifenthrin. Every ten days, the tanks were dosed, and 30 days the clams were analyzed for their weight and growth.

Every combination of pesticide dosing resulted in higher mortality rates than control tanks where clams were not exposed to any pesticides.  Many of the nonlethal changes observed indicate a loss of fitness in the environment, such as elongated shells, low tissue weight, and slower rate of clearing algae from their tank with clams exposed to a combination of atrazine and hexazinone.'

filed under wildlife/aquatic organisms

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Wednesday, January 12, 2022

Glyphosate-induced gut microbiota dysbiosis facilitates male reproductive toxicity in rats

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Glyphosate-induced gut microbiota dysbiosis facilitates male reproductive toxicity in rats (Sci Total Environ. 2022 Jan 20;805: Epub 2021 Sep 16,2021).

' Data showed that GLY(phosate)-exposed rats exhibited male reproductive dysfunction, evidenced by impaired testis architectural structure, reduced sperm motility, together with increased sperm malformation ratio....these findings uncover an underlying mechanistic scenario that gut microbiota dysbiosis-driven local IL-17A production is one reason responsible for male reproductive toxicity induced by GLY, which provides new insights into the male reproductive toxicity of GLY in mammals. '

filed under glyphosate and digestive tract/human microbiome

Thursday, January 6, 2022

Content Here.Class action lawsuit: Gramoxone (Paraquat) associated with Parkinson’s Disease

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Content Here.Class action lawsuit: Gramoxone (Paraquat) associated with Parkinson’s Disease

Gramoxone® is a herbicide used to control weeds and grasses with an active ingredient called paraquat. It is alleged that paraquat exposure is linked to Parkinson’s disease.

Siskinds and its Québec-based affiliate Siskinds Desmeules have filed proposed class action lawsuits on behalf of all Canadians who have been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease after using and/or being exposed to Gramoxone®, since July 1, 1963. The actions have been filed in Ontario, British Columbia, and Québec, and are brought against Syngenta AG, Syngenta Crop Protection LLC, Syngenta Canada Inc., Syngenta International AG, and Syngenta Crop Protection AG (the “Defendants”).

filed under legal/litigation/Canada