• Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • LIving Near Fields Increases Pesticide Exposure
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • Grow a Lush Garden Organically
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Learn to Manage Pests Naturally
  • Driving Near Recently Sprayed Fields Exposes People to Pesticides
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • SNAP Display at Event
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides

Archives for 2023

Monday, October 23, 2023

Association between urinary glyphosate levels and serum biomarkers indicative of neurological damage

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Association between urinary glyphosate levels and serum neurofilament light chain in a representative sample of US adults: NHANES 2013-2014    ( An-Ming Yang  et al, J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2023 Sep 6).

This is the first research to suggest an association between glyphosate exposure and biomarkers indicative of neurological damage in general U.S. adults. 

filed under glyphosate 2 and health/nervous system effects


 

Friday, October 6, 2023

Popular Pyrethroid Insecticides, Already Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis, Associated with Osteoarthritis

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Popular Pyrethroid Insecticides, Already Linked to Rheumatoid Arthritis, Associated with Osteoarthritis

(Beyond Pesticides, September 20, 2023) Higher concentrations of a pyrethroid metabolite (3-PBA) in the body have an association with increased osteoarthritis (OA) risk among US adults, according to a study published in BMC Public Health. Regardless of analysis sensitivity and population subgroup (e.g., sex, socioeconomic status, etc.), the association between pyrethroid exposure and OA remains.

The results demonstrate that the higher the levels of urinary 3-PBA, the greater the odds of OA in U.S. adults, highlighting the importance of routinely monitoring pyrethroid exposure among the general population.

This study is one of the first to identify the association between chronic exposure to pyrethroids and OA. The study suggests pyrethroids’ adverse impact on thyroid hormones plays a significant role in OA development, affecting cell secretions of cartilage and enzyme activity in joints.

filed under pyrethrins and Health/Arthritis

Friday, October 6, 2023

Second Session of National Forum on Environmental Justice; Recording of Forum Talks by Dave Goulson and André Leu Released

recordings available

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Second Session of National Forum on Environmental Justice; Recording of Forum Talks by Dave Goulson and André Leu Released

(Beyond Pesticides, September 22, 2022) Beyond Pesticides today announced the second session of the National Forum, Forging a Future with Nature: The existential challenge to end petrochemical pesticide and fertilizer use.  The hard-hitting talks of Dave Goulson, PhD, and André Leu, DSc. are now available as recordings on the Beyond Pesticides website

Friday, October 6, 2023

Bayer’s Use of EU-Forbidden Pesticides Ignites Protest in South Africa

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Bayer’s Use of EU-Forbidden Pesticides Ignites Protest in South Africa

(Beyond Pesticides, September 19, 2023) Farmworkers in Paarl, South Africa took to the streets on Friday, September 8, demanding an end to the indiscriminate importation and use of pesticides, herbicides, and fungicides containing substances prohibited by the European Union (EU). This protest is part of a broader global trend of outcry against systemic issues of environmental racism that disproportionately burden communities with environmental and health risks.

Meanwhile, the chants of demonstrators echoed throughout: “We’re dying of asthma, we’re dying of cancer, we’re dying of heart attacks,” a reminder of the dire consequences of corporate actions like Bayer’s.   

This demonstration comes on the heels of a visit to South Africa by Marcos Orellana, PhD, the UN Special Rapporteur on toxics and human rights. Dr. Orellana’s report highlights discrepancies in South Africa’s handling of hazardous materials.

SNAP Comment: Canada also has many registered pesticides that are banned in the European Union...

filed under Legislation/Regulatory/ international

Friday, October 6, 2023

All Pesticide Classes Increase the Risk of Central Nervous System Tumors in Children

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All Pesticide Classes Increase the Risk of Central Nervous System Tumors in Children

(Beyond Pesticides, September 21, 2023) A literature review published in Ciência & Saúde Coletiva finds environmental exposure to all classes of pesticides (fungicides, herbicides, insecticides) has an association with childhood astrocytoma (brain/central nervous system CNS tumor). CNS tumors represent half of all malignant neoplasms (tumors) in children. ...Furthermore, childhood cancer survivors can suffer from chronic or long-term health complications that may be life-threatening. ... Most notably, exposure to pesticides in the home represents the most typical type of exposure setting. This is concerning as most of one’s lifetime is spent in the home. 

filed under health/cancer/ links 2

Friday, October 6, 2023

Pollinator Health The Climate Crisis Weakens Bees Ability to Withstand Pesticide Exposure

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Pollinator Health: The Climate Crisis Weakens Bees’ Ability to Withstand Pesticide Exposure

(Beyond Pesticides, September 13, 2023) A study published in Global Change Biology finds climate change increases bees’ sensitivity to pesticide exposure, impairing the pollinators’ ability to respond to light (Ultra-Violet UV stimuli), reducing floral syrup consumption, and lessening longevity (length of life) up to 70 percent. Notably, the reduction in floral syrup consumption indicates nutritional stress that further impacts bee species’ fecundity (productiveness), driving bee declines. Unless more is done to combat the climate crisis, the current global warming scenario increasing bees’ sensitivity to pesticide exposure will continue to threaten all pollinator health.  The study analyzes the synergistic (combined) effects of global warming and sublethal insecticide exposure in the solitary bee (European orchard bee/horned mason bee) Osmia cornuta.

filed under Wildlife section/insects/insects p 2 and climate change

Thursday, September 14, 2023

Re: NOI2023-01 Consultation on strengthening the regulation of pest control products in Canada

Prevent Cancer Now comments

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Supplementary PCN submission re. NOI2023-01 on pesticide regulation (Prevent Cancer Now, September 8, 2023)   Re: NOI2023-01 Consultation on strengthening the regulation of pest control products in Canada   

These notes are supplementary to and in no way detract from the joint submission. Here we provide additional information and views based on our experiences, relevant to the four points raised in NOI2023-01.

  1. Facilitate access to confidential test data CTD, including for research and re-analysis purposes;
  2.  Increase transparency for maximum residue limits MRL applications for imported food products
  3. Give the Minister the explicit authority to require the submission of available information on cumulative environmental effects and require the Minister to consider cumulative effects on the environment during risk assessments where information and methodology are available 
  4. Strengthen consideration of species at risk in risk assessments by giving the Minister the explicit authority to require submission of available information on species at risk

SNAP Comment: this submission points out current lacks in the regulations and has worthwhile suggestions on each point.

filed under Legislation/Regulatory/Canada p.2

Wednesday, September 13, 2023

Pesticide Exposure with Disproportionate Effects Increases Risk of Asthma

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Pesticide Exposure with Disproportionate Effects Increases Risk of Asthma

(Beyond Pesticides, August 16, 2023) A study published in Environmental Science and Pollution Research further supports the indication that exposure to organophosphate insecticides (OPs) increases the risk of asthma among the U.S. general population. 

The study finds that of the 6,009 participants, 842 participants have asthma. Upon examining urine samples of the 842 patients, four out of the six DAPs were present—dimethyl phosphate (DMP), diethyl phosphate (DEP), dimethyl thiophosphate (DMTP), and dimethyl dithiophosphate (DMDTP)—demonstrating a positive association with asthma in adults. The strongest associations between asthma and OPs occur more strongly among females, non-Hispanic White populations, and individuals lacking physical activity.    “Our findings suggest that more urinary OPIs exposure may be associated with an increased risk of asthma in the general US adults. 

filed under health/respiratory and organophosphates

Wednesday, September 13, 2023

Serious Water Contamination from Pesticides Used on Pets, Ignored by Regulators, Again Confirmed

UK study

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Serious Water Contamination from Pesticides Used on Pets, Ignored by Regulators, Again Confirmed   

(Beyond Pesticides, August 23, 2023) The use of pesticides on pets for fleas and ticks (parasiticides) has been traced to environmental contamination in a study that confirms earlier work both by the authors and internationally, according to researchers Rosemary Perkins, a veterinary surgeon, and David Goulson, PhD at the University of Sussex. The results are published in their recent study, “To flea or not to flea: survey of UK companion animal ectoparasiticide usage and activities affecting pathways to the environment,” which concludes that, “The potential cumulative impact of parasiticide emissions into the environment from many millions of pets treated multiple times each year is of serious concern.”  SNAP Comment: While fipronil is not registered in Canada, there are 100 imidacloprid containing pesticide products registered in Canada as of 13 September 2023.

Wednesday, September 13, 2023

UK fails to ban 36 harmful pesticides outlawed for use in EU

Of those, 14 are still registered in Canada as of 13 September 2023

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UK fails to ban 36 harmful pesticides outlawed for use in EU (The Guardian, 13 September 2023)

Campaigners say Britain becoming ‘toxic poster child of Europe’ and accuse ministers of breaking Brexit promise on standards

'Thirty of the 36 were allowed for use in the EU when the UK left on 31 January 2020 but have since been banned by the bloc, and the remaining six have been approved by the UK government but not the EU since then.

Of these chemicals, 12 have been classified as carcinogens, nine have been found to be endocrine disruptors, which interfere with hormones and are linked to infertility, and eight are developmental or reproductive toxins that have also been linked to fertility problems. Two are cholinesterase inhibitors that can impair the respiratory system, and one is classified as acutely toxic.'

Link to the list (pdf) at the bottom of  UK falling behind EU pesticide standards (Pan UK, 13 Setember 2023)   Of those, 14 are still registered in Canada as of 13 September 2023:  5 are carcinogens, 3 are developmental or reproductive Toxin, 6 are Endocrine Disruptor (EDC), 1 is highly bee toxic and 1 is a ground water contaminant. The ones underlined have the most products registered.

  • Bispyribac (2 products, herbicide: no environmental or health issue noted), 
  • Bromadiolone (30, rodenticide: Developmental or Reproductive Toxin, High Acute Toxicity),
  • Cloquintocet-mexyl (9, all technical),
  • Cyprosulfamide (1 technical),
  • Etridiazole (5,fungicide: Carcinogen, Endocrine Disruptor (EDC))
  • Famoxadone (2, fungicide), 
  • Fenbuconazole ( 2 fungicide: Carcinogen, Endocrine Disruptor (EDC))
  • Flutriafol ( 3, fungicide: Endocrine Disruptor (EDC)), 
  • Ipconazole (13, fungicide: Ground Water Contaminant), 
  • Mancozeb (27, fungicide:Carcinogen, Endocrine Disruptor (EDC), Developmental or Reproductive Toxin), 
  • Myclobutanil (4, fungicide: Endocrine Disruptor (EDC), Developmental or Reproductive Toxin), 
  • Phosmet (3 insecticide: Highly Bee Toxic, Carcinogen, Cholinesterase Inhibitor),
  • Piperonyl butoxide (302, insecticide: Carcinogen, Endocrine Disruptor (EDC)),
  • citronella oil (insect repellent, no effect noted)

filed under Legislation/regulatory/ Europe and Canada2

Wednesday, September 13, 2023

Illness Tied to Petrochemicals Impact on Bodys Essential Mast Cells -immune system regulators- Study Finds

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Illness Tied to Petrochemicals’ Impact on Body’s Essential Mast Cells (immune system regulators), Study Finds

(Beyond Pesticides, August 22, 2023) A recently completed study (available in preprint before peer review) identifies the development of what the authors term Toxicant-Induced Loss of Tolerance (TILT), the constellation of symptoms associated with chemical exposures (also called multiple Chemical sensitivities- MCS). 'The authors describe a two-part process. First, during initiation, a person is exposed at an acute level or repeated low-level doses to a toxicant, such as an organophosphate pesticide or a natural substance like mold, that triggers immune reactions from mast cells, which are crucial immune system regulators. Stage 2, or triggering, is when exposure to previously tolerated substances causes the mast cells to degranulate, or release many inflammatory molecules such as histamines and cytokines into the cellular environment.'  Claudia B. Miller and NIcholas Ashford.

filed under TILT, Multiple Chemical Sensitivities

Thursday, August 10, 2023

UPDATE: PMRA TRANSFORMATION AGENDA, INCREASING MRLS AND ACTION

MRLs are the acceptable pesticide residue limits in food.

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UPDATE: PMRA TRANSFORMATION AGENDA, INCREASING MRLS AND ACTION (SafeFoods Matters, August 2023)

MRLs are the acceptable pesticide residue limits in food. Links in original article. 'However, the facts are that even when Canadian labels are followed, there can be high levels, as shown by recent Agriculture Canada research. Perhaps one reason is the labels and PMRA assume pesticide levels dissipate overtime, but confidential test data on glyphosate has shown the levels can increase in seed over time. Unless there is someone checking how pesticides are sprayed in the field, there will be no way to fix Canadian labels that are resulting in unexpected, high levels. This increases the risk arising from pesticides.

  • SETTING MRLS WITH CLOSED, IRRELEVANT, MADE-UP SCIENCE 
  • INTERNATIONAL TRADE ORGANIZATIONS SET CANADIAN MRLS
  • and more

Summary: The NOI 2023-01 proposals allow MRLs to be increased, protect industry data, and maintain the status quo.  Despite the rhetoric of the “Transformation Agenda”, PMRA is running an “obsolete regulatory system that protects the pest industry more than it protects Canadians”.

filed under Legislation/Regulatory/Canada p.2 and pesticides in food p2

Tuesday, July 25, 2023

Soil Amended with Insect Exoskeleton Is Effective Alternative to Harmful Chemical Fertilizers

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Soil Amended with Insect Exoskeleton Is Effective Alternative to Harmful Chemical Fertilizers

(Beyond Pesticides, June 14, 2023) The exoskeleton of the black soldier fly (BSF; Hermetica illucens) has the potential to be an effective organic fertilizer. A study in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment highlights the positive impacts on plant size, flower count, seed production, appeal to pollinators, and resilience to herbivory that the fly’s molted exoskeleton (or exuviae) can have when used as a soil supplement.

BSF exuviae contain large amounts of the natural biomolecule chitin, which enhances the growth of beneficial microorganisms. Chitin increases the concentration of plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), a microorganism useful to the plant’s defense system in fighting plant pathogens and insect pests. Moreover, PGPR leads to faster regrowth by enhancing nutrient and water uptake.

Black soldier flies are already the “most widely used insects produced for animal feed” and are known for their ability to break down organic matter. Along with their most recent use as soil supplements, BSF can contribute to a circular and organic agricultural system.

filed under Alternatives/ Fertilizers

Tuesday, July 25, 2023

Study Confirms Continued Bird Decline as EPA Fails to Restrict Neonicotinoid Insecticides

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Study Confirms Continued Bird Decline as EPA Fails to Restrict Neonicotinoid Insecticides

(Beyond Pesticides, July 21, 2023) A comprehensive and scathing report, “Neonicotinoid insecticides: Failing to come to grips with a predictable environmental disaster,” issued by American Bird Conservancy (ABC) in June, lays out the dire consequences of neonicotinoid (neonic) pesticides’ continued use. The report is an update of an earlier review from 2013, which warned of the risks to birds, stating starkly: “A single corn kernel coated with a neonicotinoid can kill a songbird. Even a tiny grain of wheat or canola treated with the oldest neonicotinoid, imidacloprid, can poison a bird. As little as 1/10th of a corn seed per day during egg-laying season is all that is needed to affect reproduction with any of the neonicotinoids registered to date.

filed under birds and neonicotinoids 2

Tuesday, July 25, 2023

Deadly Pesticide Poses an Increased Risk of Hormone-Associated Reproductive Cancers in Women

still registered in Canada for mothballs

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Deadly Pesticide Poses an Increased Risk of Hormone-Associated Reproductive Cancers in Women

(Beyond Pesticides, July 13, 2023) A study published in Environmental Science and Pollution Research finds exposure to p-Dichlorobenzene (p-DCB), a chlorophenol compound with uses as an insecticide, disinfectant, repellent, fumigant, fungicide, and deodorizer, can increase the risk of common endocrine (hormone)-mediated reproductive cancers (i.e., breast, uterine, and ovarian) in women. P-DCB or paradichlorobenzene has carcinogenic (cancer-causing) properties and the chemical has been banned in the European Union (EU) since 2005 for air fresheners and 2008 for mothballs.

SNAP Comment: As of 25 July 2023, thereare stll 4 p-diclhlorobenzene pesticides registered in Canada: 1 technical active and 3 domestic formulations as moth balls,  including 'cedar scented moth balls'.

filed under Reproductive Health

Tuesday, July 25, 2023

Despite Nearly 1,700 Pet Deaths from Seresto Pet Collars, Pesticide Product Remains on Market

US story

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Despite Nearly 1,700 Pet Deaths from Seresto Pet Collars, Pesticide Product Remains on Market

(Beyond Pesticides, July 20, 2023) Despite evidence of toxicity to pets from Seresto pet collars (manufactured with the neurotoxic insecticide flumethrin, as well as the notorious neonicotinoid imidacloprid), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) has announced that the popular flea and tick collars will remain on the market, but with new mitigation measures.

Tuesday, July 25, 2023

Global Pesticide Bans

regularly updated interactive map- international

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Global Pesticide Bans (PAN) 

Use this interactive map to explore where pesticides are banned around the world. Search by chemical to learn which countries have implemented a ban of a particular pesticide, or by country to find out which pesticides have been banned in each nation, and how many are Highly Hazardous Pesticides. PAN International regularly updates the data this map is based on. 

filed under Legislation/regulatory/ International

Monday, July 24, 2023

Zebrafish Study Links Glyphosate Exposure to Heart Damage Through Aging and Reduced Creation of Cardiac Muscle Cells

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Zebrafish Study Links Glyphosate Exposure to Heart Damage Through Aging and Reduced Creation of Cardiac Muscle Cells

(Beyond Pesticides, June 30, 2023) 'Exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of the herbicide glyphosate (GLY) has the potential to induce heart damage (cardiotoxicity) through the aging (senescence) of cells and a reduction of the number of rapidly increasing (proliferating) cells, according to a study published in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety. Specifically, glyphosate induces toxic effects on cardiomyocytes (cardiac muscles) responsible for contractions that pump the blood.' Cardiovascular (heart) disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of death and disability in the U.S. 

filed unde glyphosate2 and health/cardiovascular

Monday, July 24, 2023

Triclopyr is residual in vegetation

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B.C and New Brunswick Power company are now using triclopyr in the forest. When used by power companies, it is used under power lines. I don't know the frequency of use at this time. It is also used in roadside vegetation management.

Triclopyr residue may be found in edible plant parts; the maximum residue level in berries was reported at 2.4 ppm when harvested six days after treatment (Forest Service 1984). TCP residues have been detected in root crops follow- ing application of chlorpyrifos which also degrades to TCP (Chapman 1980). Triclopyr Herbicide Information Profile ( USDA, November 1996)

Triclopyr Roadside Vegetation Management Herbicide Fact Sheet (Washington State Dept of Transportation, 2017)  refers to human exposure. 

filed under pesticide fact sheets/triclopyr where there is additional info.

Monday, July 24, 2023

Prenatal Exposure to Organophosphate Pesticides Have Links to Behavior

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Prenatal Exposure to Organophosphate Pesticides Have Links to Behavior   

 (Beyond Pesticides, July 6, 2023) A study published in Environmental Health Perspectives finds concentrations of organophosphate (OP) metabolites in urine during the prenatal phase have links to adolescent/young adult externalizing (e.g., hyperactivity, aggression, attention problems) and internalizing (e.g., depression) behavior problems. Thus, prenatal exposure to OP pesticides can permanently affect behavioral health as children mature into adulthood. 

filed under children 2nervous system effects/attention deficit and organophosphates

Monday, July 24, 2023

Study Elevates the Connection Between Pesticides, the Gut-Brain Axis, and Disease

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Study Elevates the Connection Between Pesticides, the Gut-Brain Axis, and Disease

(Beyond Pesticides, June 27, 2023)  A new review article by Irish and Dutch researchers in the ISME Journal adds to the emerging scientific literature examining how pesticides affect the relationship between the human gut and the human brain (the “gut-brain axis”). Often called the “second brain” because it houses nerve cells and produces neurotransmitters, the gut-brain axis may be the most important locus where microbes and pesticides meet.    Pesticides may exert influence over any or all of 'gut-brain processses". They may also affect the immune system, and some, such as glyphosate, can cross the blood-brain barrier. Pesticides can affect the production of many chemicals by gut bacteria, including serotonin and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), both important neurotransmitters. They are also notorious for disrupting the endocrine system, including reproductive hormones; 

filed under digestive tract/microbiome

Monday, July 24, 2023

High Frequency of Household Pesticide Exposure Can Double the Risk of Parkinsons Disease Among the General Population

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High Frequency of Household Pesticide Exposure Can Double the Risk of Parkinson’s Disease Among the General Population

(Beyond Pesticides, July 11, 2023) A study published in Parkinsonism & Related Disorders finds high exposure to household pesticides increases the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease (PD) two-fold. 

filed under nervous system effects./Parkinson's p.2

Monday, July 24, 2023

Mapping the key characteristics of carcinogens for glyphosate and its formulations: A systematic review

New scoping review strengthens glyphosate carcinogen connection claim.

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Mapping the key characteristics of carcinogens for glyphosate and its formulations: A systematic review

 (Iemaan Rana et al, Chemosphere, 2023. The link goes to ScienceDirect for free access.) New scoping review strengthens glyphosate carcinogen connection claim.

filed under health/cancer/ links. and glyphosate 2

Saturday, July 15, 2023

Perfect example of why lawn care companies have to be regulated!

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A perfect example of why lawn care companies have to be regulated!

SNAP’s answer to the Weed Man statement:

No chinch bugs in SK and 100% effective chemical-free treatment. 

‘That is rich considering that, to my knowledge, we have no chinch bugs in SK. When I gave SNAP's presentation to the city, I mentioned that some companies were selling services on false pretenses, leading to increased pesticide use, in this case a totally unneeded one.

Also, what alternative lawn companies do for chinch bugs in Halifax is vacuum the lawn with a wet vac: gets 100% of all stages while spraying may get 60%. 

AD:

Weed Man Regina/Moose Jaw

‘A single chinch bug will lay approximately 250 eggs, and it only takes 3 weeks for these pests to destroy a lawn if they don’t get properly treated.’  

Below the ad it says:' Environmentally Safe Pest Protection    Premium Lawn Care by Trained Professionals'

Link to the Weed Man's Facebook ad: https://www.facebook.com/reginaweedman/posts/688151416663777

filed under Industry Shenanigans/ False Advertising

Friday, July 14, 2023

Syngentas SWAT Team Internal Files Reveal Secret Strategies to Influence Science

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Syngenta’s “SWAT” Team – Internal Files Reveal Secret Strategies to Influence Science (Sustainable PUlse, 14 July 2023)

Paraquat has been shown in some research to increase the risk of Parkinson’s 150% and is cited in a 2020 book by four leading neurologists as a causal factor for the disease.
'The files reveal an array of tactics, including enlisting a prominent UK scientist and other outside researchers who authored scientific literature that did not disclose any involvement with Syngenta; misleading regulators about the existence of unfavorable research conducted by its own scientists; and engaging lawyers to review and suggest edits for scientific reports in ways that downplayed worrisome findings.
The files also show that Syngenta created what officials called a 'PQ SWAT team' to be ready to respond to new independent scientific reports that could interfere with Syngenta’s 'freedom to sell' paraquat. The group, also referred to as Paraquat Communications Management Team,was to convene 'immediately on notification' of the publication of a new study, 'triage the situation,' and plan a response, including commissioning a “scientific critique.'
A key goal was to 'create an international scientific consensus against the hypothesis that paraquat is a risk factor for Parkinson’s disease,' the documents state.
In another example of a company tactic, an outside lawyer hired by Syngenta to work with its scientists was asked to review and suggest edits on internal meeting minutes regarding paraquat safety. The lawyer pushed scientists to alter 'problematic language' and scientific conclusions deemed 'unhelpful' to the corporate defense of paraquat.  'The New Lede and the Guardian made clear, among other things, that Syngenta had evidence 50 years ago that paraquat could accumulate in the human brain.     

SNAP Comment: nothing new under the sun. Just more evidence of already documented industry tactics. While paraquat is not currently registered in canada, 16 products used to be sold, many for domestic (consumer) use. PARAQUAT TECHNICAL's last Sale by Registrant : 2017-03-31 and last Sale by Retail : 2022-03-08on the last expiry date of registration. It likely has not yet disappeared from use in Canada.

filed under Industry Shenanigans p.2

Friday, July 14, 2023

Thursday, July 13, 2023

How can I wash out pesticides from dirty work clothes?

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How can I wash out pesticides from dirty work clothes?  (National Pesticide Information Center, June 03, 2016)

Useful Info that should have been on SNAP site before. 

filed under emergencies

Thursday, July 13, 2023

How to Get Rid of Poison Ivy Naturally

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How to Get Rid of Poison Ivy Naturally

7 Ways to Kill Poison Ivy Naturally (by Barbara Gillette, Master Gardener, The Spruce, 09/22/22)  this site also mentions 

  • How to dig out plant and roots
  • goats will eat it
  • gives warnings about not spraying adjacent plants even with a natural spray.

How to Get Rid of Poison Ivy Plants (Home depot video and site)  Skip the chemical herbicide part and look at the rest.

  • How to Identify
  • Pulling (wearing appropriate clothing)
  • Smothering
  • Boiling water (It is apparently safe to do so)
  • Home made spray (below)
  •  how to clean tools and body to avoid a reaction.
  • safe disposal

What kills poison ivy permanently naturally?  You can kill poison ivy without noxious chemicals by dissolving one cup of salt, one tablespoon of white vinegar, and one tablespoon of dish soap in a gallon of water. Pour this soapy water mixture into a spray bottle and apply it liberally to the whole plant. Jun 7, 2021 and   It also mentions using concentrated vinegar  but the city of Regina used that around playgrounds and say that the acid is really hard on equipment.

SNAP comment: I don't know if the dried up/dead plant still has urushiol so they should be removed with gloves and all tools, gloves etc cleaned as per video. However, keep in mind this natural methods only kill the surface parts of the plant. The rhizomes will still push up new shoots in time. To permanently get rid of a patch, it would have to be disconnected from others, and these natural methods applied many times. I have never tried it. Persistence is the key.

filed as subpage under alternatives/weeds

Friday, June 23, 2023

Government of Canada moves forward on commitments to strengthen the pesticide review process

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Government of Canada moves forward on commitments to strengthen the pesticide review process (Health Canada News release, June 20, 2023) 

'Following consultation with stakeholders to better understand Canadians’ expectations about the pesticide regulatory review process and its transparency, Health Canada has restarted the science-based process of evaluating acceptable increases to pesticide residue limits, in line with international guidelines.'

Nice words and hope from the minister.
“Today, a new approach was put forward to eliminate the non-essential, cosmetic use of pesticides on federal lands. Our commitment to leading by example through the Greening Government Strategy is not just about the fight against climate change, but also about protecting biodiversity and greenspaces. This amendment will put these goals into action and further expand our efforts.” The Honourable Mona Fortier, President of the Treasury Board of Canada

filed under Legislation/Regulatory/Canada

Friday, June 23, 2023

New York OAG Forces Bayer and Monsanto to Pay $6.9 M over False Claims on Roundup Safety

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New York OAG Forces Bayer and Monsanto to Pay $6.9 M over False Claims on Roundup Safety (Sustainable Pulse, 23 June 2023) The settlement also requires Bayer and Monsanto to immediately remove or discontinue any advertisements that represent Roundup® consumer products containing glyphosate as safe, non-toxic, harmless, or free from risk to pollinators and other wildlife. Bayer and Monsanto must also direct distributors and retailers of these consumer Roundup® weedkillers to cease the dissemination of any marketing materials that contain these allegedly false representations. Per the agreement, Bayer and Monsanto will submit an annual report and certification of compliance with the agreement to OAG, and the companies will be subject to a $100,000 penalty for each failure to uphold the obligations of the settlement.

filed under Legal/Litigation/glyphosate

Sunday, June 11, 2023

Poisoning Regulation, Research, Health, and the Environment: The Glyphosate-Based Herbicides Case in Canada

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Poisoning Regulation, Research, Health, and the Environment: The Glyphosate-Based Herbicides Case in Canada

(by Marie-Hélène Bacon et al, Toxics 2023, 11(2), 121; Published: 26 January 2023)

Abstract:

 'Glyphosate-Based Herbicides (GBHs) are the most widely used pesticides on the planet as well as in Canada, where a total of almost 470 million kilograms of declared “active” ingredient glyphosate was sold between 2007 and 2018. GBHs accounted for 58% of pesticides used in the agriculture sector in Canada in 2017. While the independent scientific literature on the harmful health and environmental impacts of pesticides such as GBHs is overwhelming, Canada has only banned 32 “active” pesticide ingredients out of 531 banned in 168 countries, and reapproved GBHs in 2017 until 2032. This article, based on interdisciplinary and intersectoral research, will analyze how as a result of the scientific and regulatory captures of relevant Canadian agencies by the pesticide industry, the Canadian regulation and scientific assessment of pesticides are deficient and lagging behind other countries, using the GBH case as a basis for analysis.'


filed under glyphosate 2 and Safety of Pesticides

Sunday, June 11, 2023

Safe Food Matters returns to Federal Court in its ongoing battle with Health Canada over glyphosate,

June 13, 2023

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On June 13, 2023, Safe Food Matters returns to Federal Court in its ongoing battle with Health Canada over glyphosate, Canada’s most widely used herbicide.

'Why? Because something’s not right. In February, 2022, the Federal Court of Appeal ordered the PMRA to review our “Notice of Objection” for a second time – and the Court even provided “Guidance” to PMRA on how to address the issues. But PMRA did not follow the Guidance.

Even more, PMRA bent over backward to not address the concerns we raised. PMRA rewrote history. PMRA made up totally new legal tests. PMRA reached for rebuttals without evidence. PMRA defied the rules of procedural fairness. It is clear PMRA does not want a review panel, even though the law allows for it.

Watch the Hearing: We would appreciate your support by watching the virtual hearing. It starts at 9:30 am PST, 12:30 EST and is scheduled for the full day. Go to this link for the calendar of hearings for June 13 (link in link), and scroll down to the Ottawa hearing for the case, and select the icon “register for the hearing” which looks like a pen on paper. Our case is Safe Food Matters Inc. v. The Attorney General of Canada and Minister of Health Docket T-2292-22.  Our counsel is Jason Gratl.

The filings for the Motion will be on our website, under Filings for case T-2292-22.'

filed under glyphosate 2 and  safety of pesticides

Sunday, June 11, 2023

Creeping bellflower (Campanula rapunculoides) control

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Creeping Bellflower (Gardening at Usask, 2020)

Please never give that away ro trade it. It should never be available for sale.    'The problem is this plant has two very powerful means of reproduction. First, it has thick, fleshy roots called rhizomes which spread and mat and crowd out other plants. Secondly, this plant produces thousands of seeds which remain viable in the soil for many years. There is no quick fix but you can be successful if you are vigilant.'

SNAP Comment: 'My yard is threatened on all sides. We keep an edge dug up. The worst problem I have is where it grows among Lindley' Asters and I can't figure it out until it blooms.... I patrol the back alley and keep pulling anything going to seed and dig whatever comes close to the garden. When I dig some up, I carefully pick up all the roots ( even the tiny ones), then lay them on the driveway in the sun until dessicated before throwing them away.

filed under Alternatives/Weeds/Creeping Bellflower

Sunday, June 4, 2023

New Viewpoint on the Historic Link between Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Cancer Discussed

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New Viewpoint on the Historic Link between Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Cancer Discussed

(Beyond Pesticides, May 25, 2023) A review of scientific literature published in the Journal of Endocrinological Investigation demonstrates exposure to past and current-use endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), like pesticides, have a long history of severe adverse human health effects.

Although the review finds many studies establishing a link between EDCs and cancers, there is a lack of current criteria to test new chemicals of endocrine disrupting potential and possible carcinogenic activity.

filed uder endocrine disruption

Sunday, June 4, 2023

Residential Areas and Early Postnatal Complications for Pregnant Women Tied to Banned and Current Pesticides

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Residential Areas and Early Postnatal Complications for Pregnant Women Tied to Banned and Current Pesticides

(Beyond Pesticides, May 31, 2023) A study published in Chemosphere supports accumulating scientific research confirming that prohibited and current use pesticides are readily detectable in the human placenta. All pregnant women experience exposure to a mixture of complex pesticides like DDT (prohibited organochlorine pesticide OCP) and chlorpyrifos (current use organophosphate OP), with concentrations high enough to increase possible adverse health risks to the fetus through a placental transfer of chemicals.Prenatal development in the intrauterine environment is one of the most vulnerable periods of exposure, as the fetus is most susceptible to the harmful effects of chemical contaminants.    Study done in chemical-intensive fruit production area in Patagonia, Argentina.

 ...the researchers find a concentration of 23 pesticides: trifluralin (herbicide), chlorothalonil and HCB (fungicides), chlorpyrifos (insecticide), and organochlorines like HCHs, endosulfans, DDTs, chlordane, heptachlor, drins, and metoxichlor. Among urban and rural residential settings, rural groups of pregnant women have significantly higher levels of chlorpyrifos. However, DDT and chlorpyrifos are the major constituents of placentas regardless of urban or rural residency.

SNAP Comment: There are still 21 chlorpyrifos, 27 (from 46 historically) trifluralin, 25 (from 68 historically) chlorothalonil commercial formulations registered in Canada at this time. DDT, chlordane, heptachlor, aldrin and many other organochlorine were also historically registered.

filed under Body burdens and children 2

Sunday, June 4, 2023

Nontoxic Method To Deter Rodents from Eating Planted Seeds in Crop Production

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Scientists Develop Nontoxic Method To Deter Rodents from Eating Planted Seeds in Crop Production

(Beyond Pesticides, May 23, 2023) Published in the journal Nature Sustainability this month. The new tactic, which confuses mice through olfactory misinformation, has the potential to significantly reduce the use of hazardous rodenticides in farming operations. 

. Scientists recorded 61% fewer mouse diggings on plots pretreated with wheat germ oil during the first week. After germination, diggings were 74% lower on these plots compared to the controls. Those treated at time of planting also saw similarly less mouse damage after one week, though not as significant. Yet by week two, 63% fewer diggings occurred in these plots. The reduction in digging followed alongside similar reductions in lost seedlings.

filed under alternatives/mammals

Sunday, June 4, 2023

Study Shows 50% Decline in Butterfly Population Across the European Union, 1990-2011

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Study Shows 50% Decline in Butterfly Population Across the European Union, 1990-2011

(Beyond Pesticides, May 26, 2023)The use of pesticides in agriculture, transportation, and domestic settings has created a disastrous conflict for the human species.  At no point in history have people acknowledged that it is very difficult to kill the “bad” actors while protecting the “good” ones. There are not really two sides to the biological fact; rather, pesticides and biodiversity meet each other on a single plane, like a Möbius strip.

 Intensification of farming is the major culprit for grassland butterflies, and climate, especially heat waves and drought, is close behind. Industrial farming not only destroys habitat, but it uses poisonous chemicals as well.

USA: Last year the EPA admitted in response to that ruling that these three neonicotinoid pesticides are “likely to adversely affect from two-thirds to over three-fourths of America’s endangered species—1,225 to 1,445 species in all,” including many butterfly species. 

Saturday, June 3, 2023

Pesticide Exposure Increases the Risk of All Seizure Disorders, Especially Epilepsy

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Pesticide Exposure Increases the Risk of All Seizure Disorders, Especially Epilepsy

(Beyond Pesticides, May 11, 2023) A study published in NeuroToxicology finds occupational (work-related), chronic exposure to pesticides increases risk factors of epilepsy, a neurological disorder causing unprovoked, reoccurring seizures. Mounting evidence over the past years shows that chronic exposure to sublethal (low) levels of pesticides can cause neurotoxic effects or exacerbate preexisting chemical damage to the nervous system.

filed under Nervous System Effects/Epilepsy

Saturday, June 3, 2023

Revealed: The secret push to bury a weedkillers link to Parkinsons disease

about paraquat - Internal documents from chemical giant Syngenta reveal tactics to sponsor sympathetic scientific papers and mislead regulators about unfavorable research

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Revealed: The secret push to bury a weedkiller’s link to Parkinson’s disease

Internal documents from chemical giant Syngenta reveal tactics to sponsor sympathetic scientific papers and mislead regulators about unfavorable research   (by Carey Gillam, The Guardian, 2 June 2023)  

'Those documents showed that Syngenta was aware decades ago of evidence that exposure to paraquat could impair the central nervous system, triggering tremors and other symptoms in experimental animals similar to those suffered by people with Parkinson’s.

They also showed that Syngenta worked covertly to keep a highly regarded scientist studying causes of Parkinson’s from sitting on an advisory panel for the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the chief US regulator for paraquat and other pesticides.

The new documents have emerged at a sensitive time for Syngenta. In less than six months, the Swiss chemical giant faces a first-ever trial in litigation brought by US farmers and others who allege the company’s paraquat weedkiller causes Parkinson’s.'

 SNAP comment: Historically there were16 paraquat containing pesticides registered in Canada, even some as domestic products (to be used by consumers). The last to be taken off the market was Gramoxone 200 SL on 2022-03-08. As a result, this product, classified as restricted, might still be in use because the PMRA only controls sales not use. Typically a pesticide is used for several years after it is taken off the market as users stockpile it. Research on glaciers indicates that peak deposition for banned organochlorines occurs at least 1 decade after they had been banned and maximum use had occurred in North America. 

filed under Industry Shenanigans, nervous system effects/Parkinson's  and paraquat

Saturday, June 3, 2023

Scientists Zero In on Rapidly Evolving Human Pathogenic Fungi, May Be Tied to Widespread Fungicide Use

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Scientists Zero In on “Rapidly Evolving” Human Pathogenic Fungi, May Be Tied to Widespread Fungicide Use

(Beyond Pesticides, May 10, 2023) Scientists are uncovering more information about a fungal pathogen behind a disease outbreak in Indian hospitals that sickened 10 pre-term infants. According to a study published in mBIO late last month, the yeast pathogen Lodderomyces elongisporus was the causative agent of this outbreak and is rapidly evolving resistance to control measures.

filed under resistance/fungicides

Saturday, June 3, 2023

Beehive Products Contain Concentration of Pesticide Residues High Enough To Be a Risk to Consumer Health

review paper

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Beehive Products Contain Concentration of Pesticide Residues High Enough To Be a Risk to Consumer Health

(Beyond Pesticides, May 18, 2023) A study published in Food and Chemical Toxicology finds pesticide residues in beehive products pose a safety risk from dietary consumption. Beehive products (i.e., bee bread, propolis, beeswax, and royal jelly) from beekeeping or apiculture are said to have nutraceutical (health and medicinal benefits) properties. However, a wide range of pesticide residues (i.e., tau-fluvalinate, coumaphos, chlorfenvinphos, chlorpyrifos, and amitraz), especially acaricides for killing ticks and mites in hives, may accumulate in beehive products up to concentrations that pose a potential health risk. 

filed under Food, Pesticides in p.2 

Saturday, June 3, 2023

New Study Links Synthetic Pyrethroids to Neurodevelopmental Problems

deltamethrin

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New Study Links Synthetic Pyrethroids to Neurodevelopmental Problems

(Beyond Pesticides, May 5, 2023) Low level exposure to pyrethroid insecticides found in common pesticide brands like RAID and ORTHO result in neurodevelopmental damage to laboratory animals, reinforcing evidence of harm found in epidemiological studies on human exposure to these chemicals. According to research published in PNAS Nexus, mice exposed to the pyrethroid deltamethrin displayed atypical behavior similar to humans with developmental disorders. “What we are saying is that something in their brain has been altered by this exposure and it’s resulting in the same kinds of behaviors that we see in children with autism.” The study notes that the amount of pesticide provided was “well below the benchmark dose for regulatory guidance.” 

SNAP Comment: There are hundreds of pyrethroid inssecticides registered in Canada, many for domestic use like Raid, including 18 deltamethrin formulations.

filed under nervous system effects/autism and pyrethrins

Friday, June 2, 2023

Move to change how U.S. tracks pesticide use sparks protest

Scientists oppose U.S. Geological Survey plan to reduce scope and frequency of chemical database

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Move to change how U.S. tracks pesticide use sparks protest
Scientists oppose U.S. Geological Survey plan to reduce scope and frequency of chemical database  (by Virginia Gewin, Science, 30 May 2023)

'The USGS data have played a role in more than 500 peer-reviewed studies, the letter notes, including highly cited works on the impact of pesticides on public health, water quality, and ecosystems. Instead of reducing the database’s scope and frequency, the critics say USGS should be expanding it in order better track the estimated 540 million kilograms of pesticides used annually in the United States.'

 The USGS database, which dates to 1992, tracked the shifting use of more than 400 chemicals to control insects, fungi, weeds, and other pests. Now the only track 72 pesticides. Preliminary maps are released documenting pesticide use 2 years prior. Now they want to do it every 5 years.  'Some scientists also want USGS to restart efforts to track one of the fastest growing uses of pesticides: seed coatings that protect against, for example, plant diseases or nematodes.'

SNAP comment: As far as I know, we have no canadian maps. According to old stats, SK uses 33 to 36% of all pesticides sold in Canada and the PMRA annual reports don't disclose the amount and individual chemicals by province. This is apparently secret data. and that is only sales's data. As to use data, we are in total darkness. Is that any surprise that it's so hard to study correlations between pesticide use and illness or environmental harm in Canada?

filedunder

Wednesday, May 31, 2023

Presentations from delegations EX23-47 Supplemental Report - Regulate the Non-essential (Cosmetic) Use of Pesticides

includes SNAP presentation.

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Regina Executive council. EX23-47 Supplemental Report - Regulate the Non-essential (Cosmetic) Use of Pesticides  Wednesday, May 31, 2023 9:00 AM Henry Baker Hall, Main Floor, City Hall, Regina. The item came to the agenda around 4:45 pm.

includes delegations list and some of the presentations submitted in advance SNAP presentation is in its entirety down the document under EX23-47 as well as a few others. 

All Regina Council meetings are on YouTube if anyone wants to watch. They are apparaently all taped.

filed under bylaws/provincial/Saskatchewan/Regina

Monday, May 29, 2023

SNAP presentation on EX23-47 - Supplemental Report - Regulate the Non-essential (Cosmetic) Use of Pesticides

Snap prefers a bylaw but offers comments on options

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Error (DOC): file doesn't exist by the City of Regina

Saturday, May 27, 2023

Australian Pesticides Map

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Australian Pesticides Map (Friends of the Earth) You can searach the map by categories of impact (fauna, human health, drift, etc), chemicals, locations and era (period of use) 

filed under exposure to pesticides link to p. 2

Saturday, May 27, 2023

Webinar Recording: The Problem With Pesticides

and new Pesticide Atlas for the US

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Webinar Recording: The Problem With Pesticides (PAN, 25 May 2023)

Watch the recording of The Problem with Pesticides, a discussion hosted by Real Food Media featuring PAN Senior Scientist Emily Marquez and partners from the Center for Biological Diversity, US Right to Know, and Hawai’i Alliance for Progressive Action. This conversation marked the launch of the U.S. edition of the Pesticide Atlas, which details the current state of pesticide use, and panelists discussed the connections between pesticides, public health, the climate crisis, and biodiversity.

there are also European and Asian editions of the Pesticide Atlas. google for them. 

filed under Exposure to Pesticides link to p 2.

Saturday, May 27, 2023

Regulate the Non-essential (Cosmetic) Use of Pesticides

(City of Regina, EX Public Report, EX23-37

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Regulate the Non-essential (Cosmetic) Use of Pesticides (City of Regina, Saskatchewan CA,
EX Public Report, EX23-37, Tabled May 3, 2023)

If you want to speak to Executive Committee on the 31st,  you must contact the Clerk’s office by Monday noon with your name, contact information and a brief statement of what you will speak on. You will have five minutes to present and then Councillors may ask questions. The link below provides information on how to make a request to the Clerk’s office and what is required from you:  https://www.regina.ca/city-government/city-council/council-meetings/

and, the Report and appendices on Regulation of Non-essential (Cosmetic) Pesticides     http://reginask.iqm2.com/Citizens/Detail_LegiFile.aspx?Frame=&MeetingID=5819&MediaPosition=&ID=9498&CssClass=

Here is the link to the Supplemental report on City of Kelowna Pesticide Registry:     http://reginask.iqm2.com/Citizens/Detail_LegiFile.aspx?Frame=&MeetingID=5819&MediaPosition=&ID=9816&CssClass=

filed under action and bylaws/provincial/Saskatchewan

Wednesday, May 24, 2023

Flea Beetle Natural Control

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Flea beetles are starting to appear in various parts of the prairies. They are attracted to many different vegetables such as cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kohrabi, kale, radish, pak choi, potato, tomato, eggplant, arugula, beets and spinach. They also feed on nasturtium, alyssum and horseradish. Weeds in the mustard family are also hosts such as: shepherd's purse, stinkweed, common pepper-grass and any of the wild mustards or canola. Damage from flea beetles is worst at the seed leaf stage (see photo). Older plants can tolerate feeding with less damage. To learn how to manage flea beetles in your vegetable garden without using pesticides (Gardening at USask)

filed under Alternatives//Insects

Wednesday, May 17, 2023

Organic Beekeeping Able to Manage Bees As or More Successfully than Chemical-Intensive Approach

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Organic Beekeeping Able to Manage Bees As or More Successfully than Chemical-Intensive Approach

(Beyond Pesticides, April 26, 2023) 'Organic methods of honey bee management are just as or more effective than conventional, chemical-intensive management systems, according to research published this month in the journal Scientific Reports by a team of Penn State scientists...Organic colonies contained solid bottom boards, and were treated with a rotation of organic-approved materials. Combs designed specifically to rear drones (and subsequently be removed to address Varroa) were employed, and over winter rations included granulated sucrose provided in January... (O)rganic was able to effectively match chemical management in reductions – by 72% in organic to 78% in conventional, relative to the chemical-free system. The failure of input-free system appears to be a result of heavy pest pressure experienced with beekeeping in the modern era'

filed under bee die-off Alternatives/insects abduvertebrates/Additional information on certain pests has a section on Varroa mite control

Wednesday, May 17, 2023

Report Adds to Evidence of Widespread PFAS Contamination; Calls for Removal of Products

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Report Adds to Evidence of Widespread PFAS Contamination; Calls for Removal of Products

(Beyond Pesticides, May 4, 2023) One of the most widely used insecticides in California, Intrepid 2F, contains harmful levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), or “forever chemicals,” according to a report by the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) and Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER). In fact, 40 percent of pesticide products in the report tested positive for high levels of PFAS. PFAS are common in non-stick cookware, cleaning/personal care products, food packaging, and other consumer products. However, these compounds are also in pesticide products.' Tested products containing PFAs were   the insecticides Malathion 5EC (active ingredient: malathion), Oberon 2SC (active ingredient: spiromesifin)  Intrepid 2F (active ingredient: methoxyfenozide).

SNAP Comment: There are 12 malathion products registered in Canada, 2 methoxyfenozide and 0 spiromesifin.

filed under Formulants/Inerts and Contaminants/contaminants

Wednesday, May 17, 2023

More Data Shows Failure of Crops Genetically Engineered to Incorporate Insecticide

resistance development

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More Data Shows Failure of Crops Genetically Engineered to Incorporate Insecticide

(Beyond Pesticides, April 21, 2023) Into the annals of “entropic methods of agricultural pest control” arrives recent research showing that pests are, unsurprisingly, developing resistance to a genetically engineered (GE) biopesticide used for more than 90% of U.S. corn, cotton, and soybeans.

filed under gmos and resistance/Resistance to Insecticide

Wednesday, May 17, 2023

Organophosphate (OP) Pesticides in Agricultural Area Residents Urine Year Round

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Organophosphate (OP) Pesticides in Agricultural Area Residents’ Urine Year Round

(Beyond Pesticides, April 28, 2023) 'A study published in Science of The Total Environment finds agricultural communities encounter chronic and measurable pesticide exposure regardless of seasonal pesticide applications. Several biomonitoring studies demonstrate people living adjacent to or within agricultural areas often experience elevated levels of organophosphate (OP) insecticides, even while not working directly with OPs. Six dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites (breakdown products) of OPs persist in urine during the spraying and non-spraying seasons.' This is likely due to widespread contamination of foods woth OPs and household use. 

filed under body burdens  and Pesticide fact sheets/Organophosphates

Wednesday, May 17, 2023

Intensive farming is biggest cause of bird decline in Europe, study says

Use of pesticides and fertilisers identified as most significant factor behind loss of 550 million birds from skies

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Intensive farming is biggest cause of bird decline in Europe, study says

Use of pesticides and fertilisers identified as most significant factor behind loss of 550 million birds from skies
'Farmland species suffered the most precipitous decline, with numbers falling by 56.8% since research began, the study said. Numbers of urban dwelling birds were down 27.8%, and among woodland dwelling birds the fall was 17.7%.
But in all contexts, intensive agriculture, which has been on the rise across Europe, was identified as a major factor in decline, with the mass slaughter of invertebrates as pests creating a “trophic cascade” up the food chain.'

filed under wildlife/birds
 

Tuesday, May 16, 2023

Regina: Wascana Center starting their herbicide program

week of 15 May, 2023

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check the schedule at https://wascana.ca/about-us/pesticide-spraying-schedules or look at the botton right of the SNAP home page.

Friday, April 28, 2023

Leafy Spurge Control Using Flea Beetles (Aphthona spp.)

explains the life cycle so one can time mowing or grazing better.

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Leafy Spurge Control Using Flea Beetles (Aphthona spp.)  explains the life cycle so one can time mowing or grazing better. It looks like cutting off flowers or seed heads and disposing would not affect the adult beetles who feed on leaves. Mowing or grazing before emergence might be OK as long as it leaves leaves to feed on and stems to lay eggs against. 

'Flea beetle life cycle

Aphthona spp. adults emerge from the soil in late spring to early summer (Figure 2). Following emergence, adults feed on leafy spurge leaf tissue and mate. Females begin laying egg clusters of three to 15 eggs almost immediately. Egg laying continues every three to five days throughout the adult life stage. Aphthona spp. females produce an average of 220 to 280 eggs over a lifetime. Eggs are yellow and laid on the soil surface or slightly below, near the leafy spurge stem base. Larvae emerge from eggs in 12 to 19 days. The longevity of A. czwalinae, A. lacertosa and A. nigriscutis will vary from year to year depending on weather conditions. A hot, dry spring and summer will shorten the time adults are present while a cool, wet season will lengthen it. Generally, adults live for 1.5 to two months in the field. Most leafy spurge flea beetles have a single generation, egg to adult, each year.'

added to the Leafy Spurge page at alternatives to pesticides/weeds

Friday, April 28, 2023

Common Tansy Control

Tanacetum vulgare- photos in links

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I posted a photo of tansy flowers on facebook and several people commented on what a horrible weed it is and that Roundup doesn't control it. I realized I did not have a link to tansy natural control sites. It appears it is difficult to control strictly by natural means at this time but they can be hand-pulled (with gloves) and one should mow very low to the ground before July prevent seed production, followed by herbicide treatment of regrowth. This may have to be repeated for a number of years. According to the Saskatchewan government, it does not tolerate frequent disturbance. In general, roots are weakened the most when plants have extended their flower heads so one can deplete the roots better by mowing at that time.

Tansy biocontrol for USA and Canada

Tansy (Tanacetum vulgare L.) (Problem Weeds - A Cattlemen's Guide/Tansy, Government of Sasaktchewan} 

Common Tansy fact sheeet (Invasive species Council of BC, arch 2019)
" Mechanical Control
» Common tansy can not be controlled with single mowing
events (e.g. once-a-year), as the plants will respond with an
increase in vegetative growth.
» Mowing sites very low to the ground before July can prevent
seed production.
» Combined mowing and subsequent herbicide treatment of
re-growth appears to be an effective control method.
Treatments must be repeated over several years.
» Hand pulling may be used in areas where mowing and
herbicide application are not feasible. Gloves and other
protective clothing should be worn to prevent skin irritation. 

'Tansy will spread quickly from its seed and less invasively from rhizomes. The seed is viable in soil for quite some time, so it is best to cut off the flower heads before they turn into seeds. Dig out clumps of the plant where you do not wish to have it and keep old plant matter cleaned up to prevent self-seeding. Hand pulling the plants as you would pull weeds can prevent the plant from spreading. You should do this with gloves, as there have been some reports of contact toxicity. It is unlikely to be toxic to grazing animals, but minimize the spread by mowing areas with the plant when they are in bud stage.'
Read more at Gardening Know How: Common Tansy: Tips For Controlling Tansy Weeds  

filed under alternatives to pesticides/weeds


 

Saturday, April 8, 2023

Exposing CropLife International and its members messaging around global health

Facebook illustrated power point

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This #WorldHealthDay, we’re exposing CropLife International and its members’ messaging around global health, and highlighting the real impacts of the Highly Hazardous Pesticides (HHPs) they produce.
The pesticide industry group claims they’re committed to environmental and public health, but members Bayer, BASF, and Syngenta manufacture at least 27 HHP ingredients, sold under 90 different product names, in at least 57 countries. It’s clear that profiting from toxic chemicals is their only priority.
This World Health Day, the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) must fully end its #ToxicAlliance with the pesticide industry – and renew its commitments to healthy food systems. For more information on our Stop the #ToxicAlliance campaign: https://www.panna.org/.../civil-society-ips-fao...
Special shout out to PAN Intern Taylor Atienza for developing this content!

filed uder Pesticide Exposure 2
 

Saturday, April 8, 2023

EWG investigation: Dangerous agricultural chemical chlormequat found in popular oat-based products

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EWG investigation: Dangerous agricultural chemical chlormequat found in popular oat-based products (EWG, 31 January 2023) including Quaker Oats and Cheerios, 

Chlormequat was discovered in all but one of 13 non-organic oat-based cereals, granola and other products including 11 products contained chlormequat levels higher than the amount we think is safe for children’s health, and one sample contained exactly that amount. This level – EWG’s health benchmark – is 30 parts per billion, or ppb,  equivalent to a blade of grass on a football field. Chlormequat is approved for agricultural commercial use on ornamental plants only – not  on oats or any other food products grown in the U.S. But imported oats can have chlormequat residue in them, which is how they end up in the food we eat. Also lists health effects. 

SNAP Comment: 5 chlormequat products are registered in Canada as of 7 April 2023. It is regustered for use in greenhouse as well as cereal grains so we may be the source of the oat products contamination. Chlormequat is a plant rowth regulator.

filed under pesticides in food p.2

Friday, April 7, 2023

Interview about New Brunswick online spray maps for forestry

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Interview about New Brunswick online spray maps for forestry

from Caroline Lebbedarcy
I was interviewed yesterday in my capacity as Chair of SSNB by CHMAfm radio about our two online spray maps which were created a couple of years ago by our amazing computer whizz Gino Doucet. These maps use GNB released data and the maps update automatically every year.
One map lists all forest spray licenses for the current year on public and private forest land.
(new licenses publishe end of July every year)

Note: The maps referenced in this report can be viewed here and here.
The historical spray map shows all herbicide (glyphosate mixtures) spraying that has occurred on public land only (GNB only rekeases public land data, which is what our campaign targets).
If you have any questions about our campaign or SSNB merchandise please contact me or Vice Chair Donald Bowser or our other three board members Bruce Dryer, Kimberly Copp and Joël MacIntosh.

filed under forestry/ herbicides
 

Friday, March 31, 2023

Pesticides are a hurdle to environmental justice

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Pesticides are a hurdle to environmental justice link to the original paper. (PANNA, 29 March 2023)  US study.

The paper reviewed data on 31 pesticide manufacturing facilities that were in “significant violation” of environmental laws (including the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act), and compared them to state averages. The findings? Pesticide manufacturing facilities in the U.S. that violate environmental laws are disproportionately located in low-income communities.

Two groups – Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Black people – tend to have higher average urinary and blood levels of several pesticides. 

Another key highlight from the paper is the difference between risk assessments for different populations. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluates pesticides using one risk assessment approach for the general population, who are exposed via diet (food, water) and residential use. But for farmworkers and other workers exposed to pesticides occupationally, EPA uses a cost-benefit approach.

SNAP Comment: It has been a known observation for a long time that dangerous manufacturing is located in 'poor' areas. In the US these are most often people of color. This pattern also covers oil and gas as well as other toxins. As for pesticide exposure at work, most US agricultural workers tend to be temporary workers from Mexico and Latin America.

filed under exposure to pesticides

Wednesday, March 22, 2023

Creosote-Induced Health Problems Persist from Springfield, MO Production, Now Superfund, Site

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Creosote-Induced Health Problems Persist from Springfield, MO Production, Now Superfund, Site

(Beyond Pesticides, March 7, 2023) An old Kerr-McGee Wood Treatment Facility is still causing health issues among residents in Springfield, Missouri. 

SNAP Comment: so that got me checking. There are still 10 registered creosote pesticides with the PMRA as of 22 March 2023. Then I found out there are Canadian wood treatment facilities with creosote. Wood preservation facilities, creosote: chapter D is part of a Gov. of Canada document. (Jul 28, 2017) so there are likely issues in Canada as well. 

filed under Treated Wood/creosote

Wednesday, March 22, 2023

Glyphosate Exposure Associated with Liver and Metabolic Disorders in Children, Young Adults

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Glyphosate Exposure Associated with Liver and Metabolic Disorders in Children, Young Adults

(Beyond Pesticides, March 7, 2023) ..'according to research published in Environmental Health Perspectives. California study based on CHAMACOS (Center for the Health Assessment of Mothers and Children of Salinas) study.

'The results confirm there is cause for concern among young people’s exposure to glyphosate. At age 5, urinary levels of glyphosate’s primary breakdown product aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) was associated with an increase in transaminases, liver enzymes that can cause harm at high levels in the body, as well as a nearly 2x increased risk of metabolic syndrome. This trend associating glyphosate exposure with adverse effects held throughout early adulthood. Glyphosate and AMPA exposure significantly increased risk of metabolic syndrome in 14-year-olds. When paired with data on the amount of agricultural use glyphosate in a given area, having lived near an a site where glyphosate was applied from birth until 5 years of age was associated with having metabolic syndrome at age 18.

filed under Liver Disease and children/glyphosate

Wednesday, March 22, 2023

Prenatal Pesticide Exposure Threatens Childrens Language Development at 18 Months after Birth, Study Finds

2 studies one on organophosphates and one on chlorppyrifos

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Prenatal Pesticide Exposure Threatens Children’s Language Development at 18 Months after Birth, Study Finds

(Beyond Pesticides, March 9, 2023) A study published in Environmental Research finds exposure to organophosphate (OP) compounds during pregnancy, or prenatal OP exposure can cause shortfalls in language development abilities at 18 months, stifling preschool-age language expression. Additionally, a timely and co-occurring study published in Environmental International confirms similar results, highlighting that chlorpyrifos (an organophosphate) impedes neurological and psychological development, including language communication and all motor skills of offspring at 12 and 18 months old. 

SNAP Comment:  There are still 21 chlorpyrifos pesticides registered in Canada as of 22 March 2023. Chlorpyrifos was commonly used in yards and gardens for decades until banned for this use, and still brodcasted for mosquito control until recently by Winnipeg, and then Edmonton which only recently quit using it. Several other organophosphates are also still registered. 

filed under children/organophosphates, organophosphates, chlorpyrifos and nervous system effects

Wednesday, March 22, 2023

Pesticide Exposure and the Link to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

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Pesticide Exposure and the Link to Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Spanish study. (Beyond Pesticides, March 2, 2023) Populations experiencing higher levels of environmental pollutant exposure, specifically pesticides, also experience a higher rate of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a study published in Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology.

In the two areas, insecticides, including organophosphates chlorpyrifos, N-methyl carbamates, macrocyclic lactones, neonicotinoids, and pyrethroids, are commonly used. Fungicides (i.e., di thiocarbamates, conazoles, dicarboximide), anilino-pyrimidines, and copper salts, and herbicides, including bipyridyl (paraquat, diquat), organophosphonates (glyphosate), chlorotriazine, and phenylurea, are commonly used in these areas. 

The study highlights the increased risk of IBS in pesticide-heavy areas, particularly among women.

filed under digestive tract

Friday, March 10, 2023

Neonicotinoids Combined with Other Pesticides Elevate Hazards to Honey Bee

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Neonicotinoids Combined with Other Pesticides Elevate Hazards to Honey Bee  (Beyond Pesticides, February 22, 2023)   '

Among the eight pesticides tested, honey bee toxicity was as follows from most to least toxic: the neonicotinoid insecticide thiamethoxam, the organophosphate insecticide dimethoate, the carbamate insecticide methomyl, the synthetic pyrethroid insecticides permethrin, and then cypermethrin, the triazole fungicide tetraconazole, and the synthetic pyrethroids cyfluthrin and then esfenvalerate. These results did change based on different treatment lengths, yet thiamethoxam was found to remain the most toxic throughout all studies.

In the study, scientists evaluate a total of 98 different mixtures, from binary combinations of two different chemicals to octonary combinations of all eight different pesticides. Within these tests, approximately 30% of these were found to be synergistic to honey bees, exhibiting toxicity greater than each individual material in the mixture.

Perhaps the most concerning interaction came from combinations that included thiamethoxam and the fungicide tetraconazole. Any variation of pesticide combinations that include these two chemicals have a roughly 55% chance of exhibiting synergistic toxicity to honey bees.

filed unde Bee Die-off mixture effects and fungicides

Friday, March 10, 2023

Strawberries Lose Their Sweetness, Aroma, and Taste after Being Sprayed with Chemical Fungicides, Study Finds

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Strawberries Lose Their Sweetness, Aroma, and Taste after Being Sprayed with Chemical Fungicides, Study Finds

(Beyond Pesticides, March 1, 2023) Fungicides sprayed on chemically farmed strawberries reduce their flavor quality, according to research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry this week. 

Differences in sugar content are not minute, with the difenconazole expressing 10% less fructose, and boscalid group 25% less.  At the same time, levels of titratable acid increase in the fungicide treatments, and display the lowest sugar-acid ratio; the control group expresses the highest.   Treated strawberries show lower levels of flavonoid content and a lower number of total phenols compared to the control. Analysis found evidence that treated strawberries also have higher levels of oxidative stress

Filed under fungicides and food/nutrition

Friday, March 10, 2023

Glyphosate Weed Killers Reduce Crop Yields and Hamper Climate Mitigation Efforts

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Glyphosate Weed Killers Reduce Crop Yields and Hamper Climate Mitigation Efforts

(Beyond Pesticides, February 15, 2023) Finnish study of two separate experiments on the grass Festuca pratensis, an important forage crop grown for grazing animals throughout the world. 

For all experiments and plot variables, none saw glyphosate use have a positive impact on yield or biomass.   even among uncut grasses, those grown in glyphosate-sprayed soils showed the lowest root biomass. Chlorophyll content also followed this pattern, with those in the most intensively cut grouping showing the lowest content if also grown in soils where glyphosate was applied.

“This demonstrates a tremendous limitation to the potential carbon binding and storage belowground when soils are polluted by pesticide."

filed under glyphosate 2 and climate change

Friday, March 10, 2023

Fathers Exposure to Toxic Chemicals in the Workplace Increases Risk of Heart Disease in Infants

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Father’s Exposure to Toxic Chemicals in the Workplace Increases Risk of Heart Disease in Infants

(Beyond Pesticides, February 23, 2023) A father’s exposure to occupational (work-related) chemicals, including pesticides (insecticides, herbicides, formaldehyde studied), around the time of his partner’s pregnancy, has an association with a higher risk of infant congenital heart defects (CHDs), according to a Japanese study published in Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine. The prevalence of infant CHDs is one of the most common genetic (congenital) diseases worldwide.

filed under children 2 and cardiovascular

Friday, March 10, 2023

Harming Wildlife, Pesticides in Waterways Run into the Great Lakes Year-Round

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Harming Wildlife, Pesticides in Waterways Run into the Great Lakes Year-Round

(Beyond Pesticides, February 14, 2023) The waterways that flow into the Great Lakes are experiencing year-round pesticide contamination that exceeds benchmarks meant to protect aquatic life, according to research published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

It is evident that the toxic soup that many U.S. waterways are carrying is unsustainable and threatens the foundation of many food chains. Imbalances in aquatic environments can ripple throughout the food web, creating trophic cascades that further exacerbate health and environmental damage.

filed under water

Monday, February 6, 2023

Common Fungicide Adds to Growing List of Pesticides Linked to Gastrointestinal and Microbiome Damage

fungicide azoxystrobin (AZO)

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Common Fungicide Adds to Growing List of Pesticides Linked to Gastrointestinal and Microbiome Damage

(Beyond Pesticides, January 26, 2023) A study published in Food Safety and Toxicology finds that the widely used fungicide azoxystrobin (AZO), used in food production and turf management, can disrupt the function of the intestinal (colonic) barrier responsible for the absorption of nutrients and defense against harmful substances.  The results reveal AZO exposure altered the metabolic profile of microbes in the gut, inducing gut dysbiosis, leading to structural damage of the colon and colonic inflammatory response. Although the L-AZO (low dose) treatment group experiences no changes in body weight compared to the control group, the H-AZO (high dose) treatment group has significantly reduced body weight and weight gain. SNAP comment: Azoxystrobin does not seem to be currently registered by the PMRA in Canada.

filed under fungicides and digestive tract/microbiome

Monday, February 6, 2023

Western Bumblebee Declines a Result of Pesticides and Climate Change, No End in Sight

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Western Bumblebee Declines a Result of Pesticides and Climate Change, No End in Sight

(Beyond Pesticides, January 25, 2023) Populations of the western bumblebee are in free fall, with 57% declines across the species’ historical range, finds new research led by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey. These data are in line with trends for other once common bumblebees in the United States, like the rusty patched and American, of which the former is now listed as endangered and the latter is under consideration.   In regard to pesticide stressors, the study focuses only on the application of neonicotinoid pesticides within the species range. Without considering other pesticide stressors, occupancy in regions where neonicotinoid applications occurred are 35% lower than areas where these chemicals are not sprayed. Not only are they lower, but scientists found trends to indicate that local populations decrease alongside increasing neonicotinoid use.

filed under neonicotinoids 2 and insects/neonicotinoids

Monday, February 6, 2023

Garden pesticides are contributing to British songbird decline, study finds

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Garden pesticides are contributing to British songbird decline, study finds (Helena Horton, The Guardian, 6 february 2023)
'The study was published in the journal ??Science of the Total Environment.
'The experiment, which surveyed 615 gardens in Britain, found 25% fewer house sparrows when glyphosate was used regularly. This is an ingredient found in commonly used herbicide brands such as Roundup or Gallup.
Slug pellets also seemed to have an impact on bird sightings; in gardens where metaldehyde slug pellets were used, house sparrow numbers were down by almost 40%.
Prof Dave Goulson, of the school of life sciences at the University of Sussex, said: “The UK has 22 million gardens, which collectively could be a fantastic refuge for wildlife, but not if they are overly tidy and sprayed with poisons. We just don’t need pesticides in our gardens. Many towns around the world are now pesticide free.”'

filed under wildlife section//birds and glyphosate 2

Thursday, January 26, 2023

Growing Sunflowers Near Honey Bee Colonies Helps Reduce Mite Problems

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Growing Sunflowers Near Honey Bee Colonies Helps Reduce Mite Problems

(Beyond Pesticides, January 18, 2023) Sunflower plantings have the potential to significantly reduce mite infestations in nearby honey bee colonies, according to research recently published in the Journal of Economic Entomology by researchers with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).

For every doubling of sunflower crop production, models employed show a nearly 1/3 decrease in varroa mite infestation. For the fall pollen feeding experiment, colonies fed sunflower pollen saw a 2.75 fold reduction in the intensity of Varroa infestation compared to the artificial pollen treatment. For the spring feeding, Varroa was found in only one-third of hives sampled. Neither the fall nor spring feed experiment, or the individual caged bee experiment saw a significant effect on viral loading or Nosema prevalence, however.

filed under alterntives/insects and invertebrates/additional information and Bee Die-Off

Thursday, January 26, 2023

NCAP s Pest Management Guide

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NCAP's Pest Management Guide full of resources for identification of plant diseases, insects and weeds, management inclding alternatives and much more. Tailored ot the US NorthWest but much information is applicable elsewhere. 

filed under alternatives

Thursday, January 26, 2023

Glyphosate Exposure and Urinary Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in the Agricultural Health Study

evidence supporting an association between glyphosate exposure and oxidative stress in humans

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Glyphosate Exposure and Urinary Oxidative Stress Biomarkers in the Agricultural Health Study   (Journal of the National Cancer Institute, djac242, https://doi.org/10.1093/jnci/djac242, January 2023)

Our findings contribute to the weight of evidence supporting an association between glyphosate exposure and oxidative stress in humans and may inform evaluations of the carcinogenic potential of this herbicide.

filed under glyphosate and cancer/links

Thursday, January 26, 2023

Neonicotinoid Insecticides Adversely Affect Nervous System Health, According to Study

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Neonicotinoid Insecticides Adversely Affect Nervous System Health, According to Study

(Beyond Pesticides, January 19, 2023) Chinese study. 'Research published in Environmental Health Perspectives finds the presence of nine various neonicotinoids (neonics) and six neonic metabolites within human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)

Researchers collected CSF samples from patients experiencing similar symptoms with a different disease/clinical diagnosis (i.e., “mostly viral encephalitis, encephalitis other than viral encephalitis, leukemia, cerebral hemorrhage, cerebral laceration, urinary tract infection, respiratory failure, pulmonary tuberculosis, and posterior circulation ischemia”). 

Ninety-nine percent of the 314 CSF samples contain at least one neonic. Of the 314 CSF samples, nine percent (28) have a single neonic compound, 84 percent (265) have between 2 and 6, and six percent (19) have between 7 and 10 neonic compounds. Nine of these neonics in CSF samples are nitenpyram (NIT), thiamethoxam, imidacloprid, acetamiprid (ACE), thiacloprid, clothianidin, flonicamid, imidaclothiz, and sulfoxaflor. Additionally, six neonic metabolites are present in CSF: N-desmethyl-thiamethoxam, olefin-imidacloprid, 5-hydroxy-imidacloprid, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid (N-dm-ACE), thiacloprid-amide, and 6-chloronicotinic acid.

filed under neonicotinoids 2 and nervous system effects

Wednesday, January 25, 2023

Pesticides Not Only Linked to Parkinsons Disease Development, But Accelerating Disease Symptoms

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Pesticides Not Only Linked to Parkinson’s Disease Development, But Accelerating Disease Symptoms

(Beyond Pesticides, January 12, 2023) Exposure to certain pesticides among individuals diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease (PD) can increase the risk of symptom progression. According to a study published in Science of the Total Environmentnearly 20 percent of pesticides associated with the onset of PD also increase the risk of faster decline in motor and non-motor function.   Using a geographic information system (GIS) tool to gather information on ambient exposure to pesticides in residences and workplaces via California Pesticide Use Report records and land use records. The researchers examine the association between 53 pesticides with links to PD onset to determine PD symptom progression for five years and 2.7 years (respectively) for two patients.   

Of the pesticides with links to PD onset, ten or ~18.8 percent (i.e., copper sulfate pentahydrate, 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid MCPA dimethylamine salt, tribufos, sodium cacodylate, methamidophos, ethephon, propargite, bromoxynil octanoate, monosodium methanearsonate MSMA, and dicamba) have associations with faster symptom progression. 

SNAP comment:  dicamba is used in most lawn care herbicide formulations. There are currently 83 copper sulfate, 95 MCPA , 4 ethephon,107 dicamba,and 0 tribufossodium cacodylate, methamidophos, propargite, bromoxynil octanoate, monosodium methanearsonate MSMA products registered in Canada although some have been historically registered. 

filed under nervous system effects/Parkinson's

Friday, January 20, 2023

Integrated Weed Management: Biological Control Options

using goats and cattle for weed control in Sasaktchewan.

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Integrated Weed Management: Biological Control Options (SK Prairie Conservation Action Plan -PCAP) 40 minute Youtube video.

Speaker: Sheena McInnes, Frenchman - Wood River Weed Management Area and SODCAP Presentation summary: The presentation will be mostly a video introduction of two grazing experts speaking on using cows and goats to control weeds.

Lee Sexton started with sheep but found goats more effective and acceptable to SK cattle producers for integrated weed management as they mostly don't eat grass. Lee mentions Leafy Spurge control. He assesses the site and can train his goats to eat the target weeds. sextongc@icloud.ca 

Ralph Corcoran is a trained in holistic manager with cattle and is using the approach to rehabilitate the pastures on his farm. He has had success with controlling absinthe, burdock, thstle and even some leafy spurge by intensively grazing at the right time and rotation. Sheep or goat following cattle work good on Leafy Spurge. "With small paddocks, you can fix one problem at a time. it really works well." Stop the overgrazing. rlcorcoran@sasktel.net

www.holisticmanagement.ca

Friday, January 20, 2023

Study Connects Neonicotinoids to Liver Damage Ignored by EPA

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Study Connects Neonicotinoids to Liver Damage Ignored by EPA

(Beyond Pesticides, January 11, 2022) Neonicotinoid insecticides can have detrimental effects on liver health, according to research published in the Journal of Hazardous Materials. (Chinese study)

 Scientists determined the amount of eight neonicotinoids in bile samples, including acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, imidacloprid, imidaclothiz, nitenpyram, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam.  

Researchers found that neonicotinoids are neither metabolized by the liver nor excreted by urine. Of all samples taken, at least one neonicotinoid was detected in 99% of individuals tested. However, different neonicotinoids were found to act in different ways. While the detection of acetamiprid was low (1% of samples), 97% contained nitenpyram. The widely used insecticide dinotefuran was detected in 86% of bile. Detections did not appear to differ between participants of different health backgrounds.(cancer vs control).

The results led scientists to believe that neonicotinoids found in bile will eventually be absorbed again by the intestines, make their way into blood, and eventually one’s liver. Biomarkers tested, such as cholesterol, bilirubin, and bile acids, were found to correlate with higher concentrations of certain neonicotinoids. Of the various neonicotinoids, dinotefuran, thiamethoxam, and clothianidin were found to pose the greatest risk to liver health.

filded under neonicotinoids and liver

Friday, January 20, 2023

Neonicotinoid Insecticides Add to the Growing List of Chemicals that Transfer between Mother and Fetus

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Neonicotinoid Insecticides Add to the Growing List of Chemicals that Transfer between Mother and Fetus

(Beyond Pesticides, January 4, 2022) A study published in Environmental Science and Technology finds neonicotinoids (neonics) and their breakdown products (metabolites), like other chemical pesticide compounds, can readily transfer from mother to fetus. 

 Levels of five neonics (acetamiprid, imidacloprid, clothianidin, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) and two metabolites of acetamiprid and imidacloprid were measured.

The most abundant neonic in mothers’ serum (MS) and cord serum (CS) samples is imidacloprid, whereas acetamiprid’s metabolite is the most abundant in CS and MS. Both parent and metabolite neonics have a high ransplacental transfer efficiencies (TTE), with imidacloprid having the highest transfer rate (1.61). Even the neonic with the lowest TTE of 0.81, thiamethoxam, is within the high TTE range, indicating proficient placental transfer of these chemicals from mother to fetus. Researchers identify that transplacental transfer of these chemicals mainly occurs through passive mechanisms depending on chemical structure. 

filed under neonicotinoids and children/neonicotinoids

Friday, January 20, 2023

Pollinator Decline Leads to Crop Losses, Malnutrition, and Highest Threat to Low-Income

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Pollinator Decline Leads to Crop Losses, Malnutrition, and Highest Threat to Low-Income

(Beyond Pesticides, January 10, 2023) Pollinator losses are responsible for reducing the global production of nuts, fruits, and vegetables by 3-5%, and this loss of healthy, nutrient-dense food is resulting in over 425,000 excess deaths each year, according to research published late last year in Environmental Health Perspectives.

filed under terrestrial invertebrates

Friday, January 20, 2023

Survey Technique Increases Agricultural Resiliency and Protects Pollinators; Higher Species Diversity in Organic

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Survey Technique Increases Agricultural Resiliency and Protects Pollinators; Higher Species Diversity in Organic

(Beyond Pesticides, December 21, 2022) Imagine plucking a flower and being able to find out every insect that recently visited that plant. By evaluating the environmental DNA (eDNA) left behind by insect pollinators alongside visual assessment surveys, a new study is providing an innovative way for farmers to improve pollination and protect on-farm biodiversity.   Scientists also conducted visual monitoring, whereby an observer stood between two orchard rows and recorded all flower visitors within roughly eight feet of themselves. The two methods of observation provide somewhat differing, yet complimentary results.

filed under terrestrial invertebrates

Friday, January 20, 2023

Insecticidal Bed Nets Contribute to Resistance in Bed Bug Populations

Insecticidal Bed Nets Contribute to Resistance in Bed Bug Populations

(Beyond Pesticides, January 5, 2022) The use of insecticidal bed nets (IBNs) to prevent mosquito bites in malaria-endemic communities can result in resistance developing in secondary pests like bed bugs, according to research published in Parasites and Vectors. Decreased efficacy against bed bugs and other non-mosquito pests may result in misuse of both mosquito adulticides and bed nets, hampering efforts to stop the spread of malaria and other insect-borne disease.

filed under resistance/insecticides

Wednesday, January 11, 2023

Ultraviolet Light Researched as a Pest Control Technique

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Ultraviolet Light Researched as a Pest Control Technique

(Beyond Pesticides, December 14, 2022) Ultraviolet (UV-C) light has the potential to successfully manage mite (Tetranychus urticae) populations without reducing yields or resorting to toxic pesticides, according to research published by scientists at University of Florida. “Since very few miticides (sprays) are currently effective in suppressing twospotted spider mites in strawberries, the use of UV light provides an effective physical control method that can be used in fields and in high-tunnel strawberry production systems,” says study author Sriyanka Lahiri, PhD. The findings provide an encouraging technique for farmers, but further investigation is needed to observe the success of this approach in other cropping systems.

flied under alternatives/insects/links 

Wednesday, January 11, 2023

Mother and Child Health: Learning Disorders and Prenatal Pesticide Exposure Study Results Released

ADHD and autism

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Mother and Child Health: Learning Disorders and Prenatal Pesticide Exposure Study Results Released

(Beyond Pesticide, December 20, 2022) A meta-analysis published in Chemosphere finds prenatal pesticide exposure, or pesticide exposure during pregnancy has a positive association with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD). Particularly, exposure to chemical classes organophosphate (OP) and pyrethroid (PYR) insecticides, in addition to the mother’s age during pregnancy (≥30 years old), increased the risk factor of ASD. ADHD risk increases among offspring whose mothers encounter organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) during gestation.

filed under organophosphates, insecticides and nervous system effects/ADHD and autism

Wednesday, January 11, 2023

Estrogen-Mediated Cancers in Humans Have Links to Endocrine Disrupting Pesticides

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Estrogen-Mediated Cancers in Humans Have Links to Endocrine Disrupting Pesticides

(Beyond Pesticides, December 13, 2022)  Adding to the science, a review published in Environmental Exposure, Biomonitoring and Exposure Assessment highlights how specific estrogen-mimicking pesticides increase the risk of disease, particularly hormone-related cancers among women (i.e., breast, ovarian, endometrial cancer) and men (i.e., testicular, prostate cancer). Like pesticides, endocrine disruptors are xenobiotic (i.e., chemical substances foreign to an organism or ecosystem). 

Pesticides are one of the most potent xeno-estrogenic compounds, as estrogenic strength and environmental half-life exceed those of other xeno-estrogenic compounds. Focusing on organochlorine pesticides (OCs), the study evaluates the chemical effects on the physiological (anatomic) system to increase cancer risk. Using human studies, researchers assessed how estrogen-medicated cancer develops in women and men. Various OCs, including aldrin, dieldrin, endosulfan, HCH, DDT, 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, phenoxy acid herbicides, and methoxychlor, have associations with hormone-related cancers. 

Despite the ban on many OCs across the globe, these chemicals remain in the environment. Many OCs can exist in the body for at least three to six years, in soil for decades, and in water for at least a century. Moreover, consumption of food and water resources contaminated with OCs can cause these chemicals to bioaccumulate in the body, resulting in the biomagnification of OCs.

filed under cancer/links and insecticides

Wednesday, January 11, 2023

Denying Science, Manufacturing Doubt: Monsanto/Bayer Promotion and Defense of Glyphosate/Roundup

the core of the pesticide industry public relations playbook

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Denying Science, Manufacturing Doubt: Monsanto/Bayer’s Promotion and Defense of Glyphosate/Roundup

(Beyond Pesticides, December 16, 2022) A report released last week — Merchants of Poison: How Monsanto Sold the World on a Toxic Pesticide — exposes not only Bayer/Monsanto malfeasance in its “promotion” of its glyphosate-based herbicide products, including the notorious Roundup®, but also, the broader landscape of corporate efforts to white- or green-wash products that companies know are harmful to people and the environment. The report was issued by U.S. Right to Know (USRTK, a nonprofit investigative research group focused on promoting transparency for public health), Friends of the Earth (FOE), and Real Food Media. It carries the pithy subtitle, “A case study in disinformation, corrupted science, and manufactured doubt about glyphosate,” a description cited by the Friends of the Earth press release as “at the core of the pesticide industry’s public relations playbook.” 

filed under industry shennigans

Thursday, January 5, 2023

Pest Management Regulatory Agency 2020 2021 Annual Report

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Pest Management Regulatory Agency 2020 2021 Annual Report (Health Canada, 2021)

'Sales of pest control products in Canada have increased from 101.1 million kg of active ingredients (kg a.i.) in 2014 to 121.3 million kg a.i. in 2018 (Figure 2). In 2018, 71.1% of pesticide sales in Canada were agricultural sector products (Figure 3), whereas 24.3% were non-agricultural sector products, and 4.5% were domestic sector products. Figure 2. Quantity of pesticides sold in Canada (2014–2018)  Glyphosate remained the top active ingredient sold in Canada in 2018 (Table 1). Six of the top 10 active ingredients sold in 2018 had been among the top 10 selling active ingredients since 2014. These top 10 active ingredients accounted for 68.7% of all pesticides sold in Canada in 2018. (p.11)

SNAP Comment: An pesticide use increase of 16.65% in the active ingredient glyphosate use in 5 years. Lots of interesting gems in this report

filed under Legislation/regulatory/ Canada

Thursday, January 5, 2023

Integrated Pest Management and Pesticides on Ontario Golf Courses Full Report

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Integrated Pest Management and Pesticides on Ontario Golf Courses Full Report (www.PreventCancerNow.ca,  November 2020) 

filed under IPM/effectiveness

Thursday, January 5, 2023

Ocean Health: Environmental Pollutants Threaten Humpback Whale Reproduction and Offspring

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Ocean Health: Environmental Pollutants Threaten Humpback Whale Reproduction and Offspring

(Beyond Pesticides, December 6, 2022) Persistent organic pollutants (POPs)—including banned pesticides—present a health risk to humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae), according to a study published in Environmental Pollution. Regarding female humpback whales, levels of POPs in blubber are higher in juveniles and subadults than in adults, primarily from the transference of contaminants from the mother to her calf. Organochlorine compounds (OCs), such as organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are well-known persistent organic pollutants. 

Overall, the most abundant POPs are PCBs, followed by DDTs and chlordane. PCB levels are above the estimated threshold for adverse health effects.   This report demonstrates that exposure to chemical contaminants adversely impacts marine mammal health globally. The study notes specific long-term health concerns among the humpback whale population not described in previous reports, including reproductive toxicity, immune dysfunction, and increased susceptibility to disease.

This article also lists other studies listing chemicals that contaminate marine mammal species BPA (plasticiser), the pesticides triclosan and atrazine, and “inert” ingredients from pesticide products

filed under mammals