• Learn to Manage Pests Naturally
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Learn About Pesticides in Foods
  • Grow a Lush Garden Organically
  • SNAP Tour of Organic Vegetable Garden
  • SNAP Display at Event
  • Driving Near Recently Sprayed Fields Exposes People to Pesticides
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides
  • LIving Near Fields Increases Pesticide Exposure
  • Link to SK Organic Resources

Archives for 2024

Sunday, April 14, 2024

Raptors And Rat Poison

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Raptors And Rat Poison (By Cathy Bell, Cornell Lab All About Birds, July 15, 2015)

Of 161 raptors brought in to Tufts Wildlife Clinic between 2006 and 2010, 139—a whopping 86 percent—tested positive for anticoagulant rodenticides. Ninety-nine percent of those had brodifacoum in their liver tissues. Yet only nine of these birds displayed sufficient symptoms to lead to a clinical diagnosis of anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning.

A knowledge gap, says Allen Fish, is precisely the trouble. “There’s no clear public record of where we’re putting pesticides, who’s using them, how much is being used. Until we demand that information, we’re flying blind. There needs to be a whole public reckoning of who uses what, and why. We need to track how operators are using pesticides and then see if there’s any correlation with animal kills. We don’t know these impacts. We don’t have any data.”

As for the environmentally conscious homeowner with a rodent problem, Palmer points out that “there are many effective, economical, and easy-to-use pest control options that are much better for human health and for wildlife.” (ABC offers a list at saferodentcontrol.org.)  According to Fish, snap traps offer a more humane way to kill rats than a drawn-out and painful death by poison.

SNAP Comment:  Brodifacoum is usually used in rodent bait. There are 17 brodifacoum containing pesticides regiaterd in Canada in April 2024. Most are registered as commercial products, none for direct use by consumers (domestic).

filed under rodenticides and wildlife section/birds p.2

Wednesday, March 20, 2024

Weed Killer 2,4-D’s Adverse Effect on the Liver Adds to List of Hazards from Food, Lawn, and Water Residues

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Weed Killer 2,4-D’s Adverse Effect on the Liver Adds to List of Hazards from Food, Lawn, and Water Residues

(Beyond Pesticides, February 21, 2024) In addition to its effects including cancer, and reproductive, immune or nervous system disruption, according to international findings, a review published in Toxics finds that the the widely used weed killer 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) causes significant changes in liver structure and function. 2,4-D can damage liver cells, tissue, and inflammatory responses through the induction of oxidative stress

The review primarily focuses on structural damage and chemical biomarkers indicating toxicity to the liver and its function. Assessing studies from PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus, researchers found 83 articles on liver effects and exposure to 2,4-D, ranging from in vivo (in living organisms) models (~70%) to in vitro (in test tube) models (~30%). Most studies focused on the 2,4-D as an active ingredient, while the remainder focused on commercial formulations of 2,4-D.

 From 1974 up to the present day, studies in this review highlight what many studies have previously: 2,4-D has a negative impact on the liver both structurally and biochemically. The review highlights that oxidative stress increases the progression of 2,4-D-induced liver damage. Yet, the lack of studies on the mechanism of action, targets, and molecular pathways involved in liver toxicity needs further understanding.

filed under 2,4-D and liver disease

Wednesday, March 20, 2024

Pesticide Exposure Linked to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Metabolic Disease in Seniors

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Pesticide Exposure Linked to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Metabolic Disease in Seniors

(Beyond Pesticides, February 27, 2024) Popular culture and official policy continue to ignore a blatant source of the rise in obesity: chemical exposures, including pesticides. A study, “Associations of chronic exposure to a mixture of pesticides and type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Chinese elderly population,” contributes to the now-massive trove of evidence linking pesticides to diseases and shows that by the time people reach retirement age they are suffering from a heavy burden of contamination that raises their risk of complex disease.

The researchers from the Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention identified 39 pesticides in the study population. Women had slightly higher levels and a stronger correlation between obesity, pesticide burden and type 2 diabetes than men. The most significant contributors were β-Hexachlorocyclohexane (β-BHC) and oxadiazon.

SNAP Comments: There are/were 0 β-Hexachlorocyclohexane (β-BHC) products and 2 oxadiazon products registered in Canada until 2023-03-16.  

filed under Diabetes/Obesity 

Wednesday, March 20, 2024

Mexico Ban on Genetically Engineered Corn Imports Spurs Challenge from U.S. and Canada under Trade Agreement

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Mexico Ban on Genetically Engineered Corn Imports Spurs Challenge from U.S. and Canada under Trade Agreement

(Beyond Pesticides, March 20, 2024) A report by CBAN unpacks the ecosystem and wildlife health impacts of genetically engineered (GE) corn in the context of Mexico’s 2023 decision to stop its importation into the country. The phase out of genetically modified (GM) corn imports into Mexico was immediately challenged by the U.S. and Canadian governments as a trade violation under the 2020 U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), which replaced the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) as the primary vehicle for North American trade policy.

SNAP Comment: That is why it is so hard for any country to ban any pesticide products. Canada itself has been sued by so many companies and countries for trying to do the right thing... This reminds me of the first article (2001) reporting that traces of DNA from genetically modified corn had contaminated the genomes of Mexican indigenous maize varieties despite of a 1998 ban. For his discovery and his vocal opposition to "dangerous liaisons with the biotechnology industry" Ignacio Chapela (UC Berkeley),  was denied tenure in November 2003.  'The science journal later said it had erred in publishing the paper, an extraordinary step, just short of a formal retraction, that some attributed to a pressure campaign by the biotech industry.'  The contamination results were upheld by subsequent research. After a bitter battle and lots of international support, Chapela was reisntated as a tenured professor in May 2005. (Professor Ignacio Chapela Wins Bitter UC Tenure Fight (By Richard Brenneman, The Berkeley daily Planet, May 24, 2005))

filed under Legal/Litigation/glyphosate

Wednesday, March 20, 2024

State Legislation Popping Up to Limit Liability of Pesticide Manufacturers

State Legislation Popping Up to Limit Liability of Pesticide Manufacturers

(Beyond Pesticides, Feb 22, 2024) The Idaho Senate failed to pass SB 1245 last week which would have provided legal protection to pesticide manufacturers from “failure-to-warn” liability. This legal framework has been pivotal not only for plaintiffs, who are typically users of a toxic product, seeking redress from exposure to glyphosate-based herbicide products such as Roundup, but can also potentially extend to any toxic pesticide products. Similar bills have recently been introduced in the Iowa, Florida, and Missouri state legislatures as petrochemical pesticide industry actors such as Bayer face billions of dollars in legal settlements from victims of pesticide injury.

see also  Bayer/Monsanto in Roundup/Glyphosate Case Stung with Largest Multi-Billion Dollar Jury Award, Asks States to Stop Litigation (Beyond Pesticides, February 23, 2024)

filed under Legal/Legislation/ USA2

Wednesday, March 20, 2024

Auditor general says Alberta s enforcement of pesticide rules needs significant improvement

Auditor found records of illegal pesticide sales, little oversight of applications

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Auditor general says Alberta's enforcement of pesticide rules needs 'significant improvement'
Auditor found records of illegal pesticide sales, little oversight of applications (CBC News, Mar 23, 2022)     

 'In a report released Tuesday, Auditor General Doug Wylie found people and businesses may have sold 80 products in 2018 that were illegal in Canada and that inspectors aren't checking whether the people applying pesticides are properly certified.     The auditor general also found admissions where people had applied too much pesticide near bodies of water, or applied pesticides in unsafe weather conditions, which went unnoticed by the ministry of environment and parks...   He also said the provincial government's list of registered pesticides is out of date and inaccurate...  When Wylie's staff reviewed the site, they found about 1,000 legal products missing, and 700 products included that the federal government now prohibits in Canada. The environment department told the auditor general it was working on updating the list...  Alberta stopped proactive inspections of pesticide applicators in 2017, which Wylie said is out of step with many other provinces. He raised concerns, too, with a lack of compiling and publicly posting the measured levels of pesticides in water...  The report said the environment department's pesticide regulatory program has three employees. Whether that's enough personnel to adequately run the program is a question for the government, Wylie said.'

Wednesday, February 7, 2024

US court bans three weedkillers and finds EPA broke law in approval process

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US court bans three weedkillers and finds EPA broke law in approval process   Ruling, specific to three dicamba-based weedkillers, is major blow to Bayer, BASF and Syngenta (The Guardian, 7 february 2024)

'The ruling is specific to three dicamba-based weedkillers ... which have been blamed for millions of acres of crop damage and harm to endangered species and natural areas across the midwest and south.

This is the second time a federal court has banned these weedkillers since they were introduced for the 2017 growing season. In 2020, the ninth circuit court of appeals issued its own ban, but months later the Trump administration reapproved the weedkilling products, just one week before the presidential election at a press conference in the swing state of Georgia.

Bury wrote that the EPA did not allow many people who are deeply affected by the weedkiller – including specialty farmers, conservation groups and more – to comment.

The EPA first approved Monsanto and BASF versions of dicamba touted to be less likely to move off target for the 2017 growing season. Since then, dicamba has caused millions of acres of crop damage, and has been the subject of several lawsuits.

In February 2020, a federal jury in Missouri awarded the state’s largest peach farmer $265m for damage to his farm, though that total was later reduced by a federal judge. In June 2020, Bayer announced a $400m settlement with soybean growers that had been damaged by non-target drift.

For years, Bayer and BASF have blamed other factors than their weedkillers, including illegal use of older chemicals, for the damage. Discovery documents turned up in the litigation showed the companies knew that their dicamba weedkillers would probably lead to off-target crop damage.'

SNAP Comment: There was no public notice and comment as required by law. Note that even when there is, and opponents present their evidence and independent studies, this evidence is usually discounted in favour of industry studies. Cost-benefit evaluations tend to inflate benefits and discount costs.

filed under Legal/Litigation/Dicamba p.2

Wednesday, February 7, 2024

Webinar: When Pesticide Drift Happens To You

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Webinar: When Pesticide Drift Happens To You (PANNA, 28 August 2023)

 While the webinar had an Iowa focus, much of the content is applicable throughout the United States.

This three and a half hour webinar can be viewed here in its entirety.

filed under pesticide drift/incidents and emergencies

Saturday, January 27, 2024

New herbicide for weed control in wheat registered

Batalium, fluorine based herbicide

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New herbicide for weed control in wheat registered

(By Farmtario Staff

'The company said in a release Batalium combats weed-related losses across all soil zones. Its forumulation features four powerful active ingredients from three modes of action, providing an easy-to-use tool for optimal results.'  

The following is provided by Meg Sears:

Batalium is a newly approved herbicide (tech sheet here), that is a mixture of three old herbicidesFlucarbazone-sodium – Group 2, Fluroxypyr – Group 4, and Bromoxynil – Group 6.

Batalium is "Compatible with over 23 registered tank-mix partners, BATALIUM AMPED herbicide lets you customize your weed management program based on weed pressure and application conditions."

Acutely toxic, Health hazard, and Environmental hazard, Irritant

These three herbicides include the -C-F3 group that will break off and affect the ozone layer, as well as halogenated ring structures that typify endocrine disruptors.

filed under Polyfluorinated pesticides and PFAs

Tuesday, January 23, 2024

Sustainable Agriculture Strategy – Ambitious success, from the Guelph Organic Conference

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For arguments on real sustainable agriculture see 

Sustainable Agriculture Strategy – Ambitious success, from the Guelph Organic Conference   (Prevent Cancer Now, 17 March, 2023)

filed under Organics/farming

Tuesday, January 23, 2024

A brand new “Frankenstein” herbicide – Tiafenacil

Tiafenacil is a new fluorine-containing herbicide, that inhibits a key enzyme to make chlorophyll.

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A brand new “Frankenstein” herbicide – Tiafenacil

(Prevent Cancer Now) scroll down the page.

Tiafenacil is a new herbicide, that inhibits a key enzyme to make chlorophyll.

Tiafenacil features several biologically-active, toxic groups, that are combined in a large molecule—a bit like a “Frankenstein” chemical.

This degrades into smaller molecules of toxic chemicals. For example, the top group with three fluorine atoms separates to form highly persistent trifluoroacetic acid. The PMRA found that young children would exceed the maximum allowable daily intake, then stated that is deemed to be acceptable because the assessment is “conservative.” This is hard to understand, given that the extrapolation (a.k.a. “safety”) factor for sensitive populations was eliminated, and there is no human data on this brand new pesticide.

SNAP Comment: As of 23 January 2024, 4 tiafenacil herbicides are registered by the PMRA for use in a variety of crops.

filed under Polyfluorinated pesticides and PFAs

Tuesday, January 23, 2024

P.E.I. potato growers have new pesticide to fight wireworm

Broflanilide, containing several trifluoromethyl groups that will likely contribute to ozone depletion

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P.E.I. potato growers have new pesticide to fight wireworm (Broflanilide)
Potato board estimates cost of wireworm damage to crops at $5 million a year  (Nancy Russell ,CBC, Posted: Mar 04, 2021)   Chemical Formula: C25H14BrF11N2O2.  Chemical name: 3-(benzoylmethylamino)-N-2-bromo-4-1,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1-(trifluoromethyl)ethyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl-2-fluorobenzamide.   This product contains several trifluoromethyl groups that will likely contribute to ozone depletion.  

SNAP COMMENT: perhaps it is different in large scale plantings, but in my organic garden, the only potatoes that ever get wireworm damage are the ones planted near the outside grass. When I edge in spring, I used to throw the grass rhizomes on top of the soil to dry up, until I found sereval wireworms seemingly living in there so now rhizomes are thrown on the grass and I have very little problems. Also PEI has an imported wireworm that may behave differently. 

filed under Polyfluorinated pesticides and PFAs

Tuesday, January 23, 2024

Ending glyphosate is a virtuous goal, and reducing pesticides is essential

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Ending glyphosate is a virtuous goal, and reducing pesticides is essential (Prevent Cancer Now, 2023) with a quick review of several registered pesticides of concern. The Federal Government  (Canada) response to the Parliamentary Petition indicates no plan to support substantially lower-input and organic practices, to achieve substantial reduction in pesticides use and risk.

 a stated goal of the UN Biodiversity Conference (COP-15), in Montreal this December, is to reduce pesticides by two thirds.

Tuesday, January 23, 2024

new page on Polyfluorinated pesticides and PFAs + EPA page

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Polyfluorinated pesticides and PFAs 

Some pesticides contain fluorine and some formulants (inerts) are fluorine based. In addition, at least HDPE plastics used in containers (i.e.for food and pesticides) contain them as well, and they are now known to leach from these containers into the content. The leaching is worse in products formulated in organic solvents such as methanol compared with water-based products. For both solvents tested (methanol and water), the study also shows continued gradual leaching of PFAS over time according to the EPA. Some pesticides contain a trifluoromethyl group that end up breaking off and forming ozone-depleting chemicals.It is apparently had to get information on that topic.

Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in Pesticide and Other Packaging (US EPA, updated 5 December 2023) This page describes EPA actions at all levels for these chemicals. 'In December 2022, the Agency issued a notice announcing the removal of 12 chemicals identified as PFAS from the current list of inert ingredients approved for use in nonfood pesticide products to better protect human health and the environment. These chemicals are no longer used in any registered pesticide product.'

Wednesday, January 17, 2024

Mental Health: Pesticides Continue to Impact the Body and Mind, Especially for Farmers

Depression

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Mental Health: Pesticides Continue to Impact the Body and Mind, Especially for Farmers

(Beyond Pesticides, January 17, 2024) Science continues to find a link between mental health and occupational (work-related) chemical exposure, with a study published in Toxicology finding an increased risk of depression among farmers exposed to pesticides. Brazil study. 

filed under mental health

Wednesday, January 17, 2024

Field Study of Bumble Bees Finds Exposure to Chemical Mixtures, High Hazard, Flawed Regulation

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Field Study of Bumble Bees Finds Exposure to Chemical Mixtures, High Hazard, Flawed Regulation

(Beyond Pesticides, January 9, 2024) A “landscape-level” study finds that typical risk assessment studies used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and European regulators fail to “safeguard bees and other pollinators that support agricultural production and wild plant pollination.” The study, published in Nature (November 2023), evaluates the health of bumble bees (Bombus terrestris) as a sentinel species placed in 106 agricultural landscapes across Europe. 

The study found a combination of insecticides and fungicides, including ten compounds found in colony pollen stores, which the authors consider to present the highest risk, based on acute toxicity. The ten pesticides (nine insecticides and one fungicide) include indoxacarb, spinosad, chlorpyrifos-ethyl, deltamethrin, dimethoate, imidacloprid, cyfluthrin, dithianon, etofenprox, and chlorpyrifos-methyl. Concern about impacts on bees extends beyond acute effects to a range of adverse impacts, including disorientation, other sublethal effects, reproductive effects and development delays, and vulnerability to disease and mite infestation.

 “Without knowledge of safe environmental limits, the total pesticides used—and therefore the total environmental dose—is governed by market demand rather than by a limit on what the environment can endure.” Standard toxicity tests on individual pesticides, according to the authors, is of “limited use” when considering wide, “diffuse environmental effects that arise from ecosystem connectivity at a landscape scale.” The study in Nature adds to the empirical evidence of devastation wrought by pesticides and the ineffectiveness of current European as well as U.S. regulatory approaches...   The failure of EPA to consider the effect of pesticide mixtures in the environment extends to the formulation of pesticide products.'

SNAP Comment: The PMRA does not consider the effects of mixtures either. There are 0 indoxacarb, 23 spinosad, 0 chlorpyrifos-ethyl,19  deltamethrin, 7 dimethoate (Cygon),102 imidacloprid, 10 cyfluthrin, 0 dithianon, 2 etofenprox, and 0 chlorpyrifos-methyl registered in Canada as of now.. Historically, there are over 200 chlorpyrifos prrducts registered. Some may still be in use, as the PMRA only regulates sales, not use. 

filed under Wildlife section/ insects/ p 2

Wednesday, January 17, 2024

Work-Related Pesticide Exposure Puts Farmers at Risk of Cognitive (Intellectual) Harm

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Work-Related Pesticide Exposure Puts Farmers at Risk of Cognitive (Intellectual) Harm

(Beyond Pesticides, January 4, 2024) A review published in the Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice finds an association between farmers’ pesticide exposure and cognitive impairment. Specifically, farmers suffer from attention deficit, lack of information processing, non-comprehension of verbal cues, slow processing speed, memory loss, sluggishness, speech difficulties, and impaired motor function. Additionally, the risk of adverse effects from exposure increases with time spent around pesticides, like in other occupational (work-related) settings.

filed under health/nervous system effects

Friday, January 5, 2024

Groups Petition EPA to Remove from the Market the Weed Killer Glyphosate

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Groups Petition EPA to Remove from the Market the Weed Killer Glyphosate

(Beyond Pesticides, December 19, 2023) Last week, farmworker organizations and Beyond Pesticides, represented by the Center for Food Safety, filed a petition with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) urging that the weed killer glyphosate be removed from the market. The petition cites 200 studies, which represent a fraction of the independent scientific literature on the hazards of glyphosate and formulation ingredients of glyphosate products. This action follows previous litigation in 2022 in which a federal court of appeals struck down EPA’s human health assessment, finding that the agency wrongfully dismissed glyphosate’s cancer risk.

“The threat of glyphosate is way outside the bounds of any reasonable person’s definition of acceptable harm, surpasses allowable risk under federal pesticide law, and represents the poster child for what has gone dangerously wrong with EPA’s program to control toxic pesticides in our environment, homes, workplaces, and communities, with disproportionate injury to farmworkers and landscapers,” said Jay Feldman, executive director, Beyond Pesticides. “This petition attempts to hold EPA accountable to the rule of law, while recognizing that glyphosate, which causes adverse effects to biological systems—from soil microbiota to the gut microbiome, can be replaced by cost-effective organic food production and land management of parks, playing fields, or lawns.” 

filed under Legal/litigation/ glyphosate

Friday, January 5, 2024

Loss of Chromosome Y in Male Farmers Genotoxic Implications for Cancer

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Loss of Chromosome Y in Male Farmers Genotoxic Implications for Cancer

(Beyond Pesticides, January 3, 2024) A study published in Environmental Health Perspectives finds elevated, chronic exposure to glyphosate throughout one’s lifetime increases the risk of mosaic loss of chromosome Y (loss of chromosome Y occurs to many men in some cells due to aging mLOY) that impacts a noticeable fraction of cells... the risk of mLOY is a biomarker for genotoxicity (the damage of genetic information within a cell causing mutations from chemical exposure, which may lead to cancer) and expansion of cellular response to glyphosate, resulting in the precursor for hematological (blood) cancers. This study is one of the first to identify sex-specific chromosome degradation, with stark evidence demonstrating links to various cancers, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

The results find that mLOY is detectable in 21.4 percent of farmers, with mLOY expanding throughout most cells in 9.8 percent of farmers. Most farmers with mLOY expanding throughout most cells are older in age, with a greater lifetime exposure and intensity of exposure to glyphosate. However, these individuals are non-smokers and non-obese, which are other risk factors for mLOY.

Filed under glyphosate p.2DNA damage and cancer/links 2

Friday, January 5, 2024

International Group of Scientists Calls for Restraints on Conflicts of Interest in Publications and Regulation

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Int’l Group of Scientists Calls for Restraints on Conflicts of Interest in Publications and Regulation

(Beyond Pesticides, December 15, 2023) Drawing on a recent gathering of international scientists, a group of 34 scientists published a call for much stricter scrutiny of researchers’ conflicts of interest by agencies that regulate and register chemicals, with recommendations for the newly formed Intergovernmental Science Policy Panel. The Environmental Science & Technology article cites an abundance of examples of chemical companies and their trade associations manufacturing doubt via an array of techniques, resulting in agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) dropping certain provisions from rulemaking, ignoring scientific consensus, and keeping chemicals on the market—and in the environment—that many scientists say should be entirely banned. 

The problem of industry interference applies to almost every industrial chemical, including pesticides, pharmaceuticals, plastics, flame retardants, and asbestos. The tactics remain the same across fields, and are derived from the campaigns waged by climate deniers, tobacco companies, and fossil fuel companies as detailed in 2010 in Merchants of Doubt by Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway.

The article documents lobbying costs, but also presents  at least 24 strategies industry uses to disguise its conflicts of interest and further its economic goals, according to Rebecca Goldberg and Laura Vandenberg, researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. These include, the authors write, “‘revolving doors’ between a regulatory authority and the industry it is meant to regulate; reliance for safety data on unpublished industry documents while largely ignoring publications by independent scientists; and covert influence by the industry.” They also often threaten lawsuits against researchers whose work conflicts with their goals.

filed under Industry Shenanigans/ p.2

Friday, January 5, 2024

Low-Dose Chronic Glyphosate Exposure Increases Diet-Induced Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

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Low-Dose Chronic Glyphosate Exposure Increases Diet-Induced Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

(Beyond Pesticides, December 21, 2023) A new study published in Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology adds to prior research indicating glyphosate promotes the occurrence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) through diet by causing liver inflammation and oxidative stress. More importantly, the predisposition for NAFLD occurred at levels within toxicological limits, which are doses of glyphosate classified as causing no adverse effects or No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL).  NAFLD is a condition that causes swelling of the liver and can eventually lead to cirrhosis, cancer, or liver failure.

Health officials estimate about 100 million individuals in the U.S. have NAFLD, with NAFLD being the most common liver disease among children. Cases of NAFLD have doubled over the past 20 years. 

However, glyphosate did increase the rate (upregulation) of 212 genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammation in the liver while downregulating 731 genes related to cell division. Muouse study. 

filed under glyphosate p.2 and liver disease

Friday, January 5, 2024

THE PESTICIDE PUZZLE A Look at Agricultural Chemicals

30 minute video

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THE PESTICIDE PUZZLE   A Look at Agricultural Chemicals (Real Ag series, 19 Dec 2023) 30 minute very interesting video giving a good introduction to pesticides.  

 It features a case study on atrazine by reknowned biologist Dr. Tyrone Hayes. PAN Senior Scientist, Marcia Ishii (PhD Ecology and Evolutionary Biology), shares her knowledge on the ecological, social and political dimensions of pesticides in food and agriculture. Rob Faux (Fox) speaks about the benefits of agroecological practices based on two decades of growing experience.

filed under atrazine and Pesticides 101Organics/farming

Thursday, January 4, 2024

Ontario superior court certifies Canada-wide class action seeking compensation for cancer caused by pesticide glyphosate

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Ontario superior court certifies Canada-wide class action seeking compensation for cancer caused by pesticide glyphosate  click on statement for the record for the pdf document. 

 (January 2, 2024—Ottawa: Bill Jeffery, Executive Director and General Legal Counsel of the Centre for Health Science and Law)

'The Ontario court action alone claims $1.2 billion plus several, as yet unquantified, additional amounts to compensate for damages. Although the main elements of proof (especially of causation) remain to be proved in the full trial, Justice Grace described the record before him as ‘mammoth’ and comprising 17,000 pages of legal and factual material. Acknowledging the Supreme Court of Canada’s reminder that “certification is a meaningful screening device” Justice Grace wrote: I have concluded there is some basis in fact for the plaintiff’s theory of liability, despite the fact its proponents face significant challenges. The required threshold has been crossed. para. 124'

filed under Legal/.litigation/ Canada p.2