• Learn to Manage Pests Naturally
  • SNAP Display at Event
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Driving Near Recently Sprayed Fields Exposes People to Pesticides
  • SNAP Tour of Organic Vegetable Garden
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • Learn About Pesticides in Foods

Archives for 2024

Tuesday, July 23, 2024

Environmental and Trade Groups Successfully Call for End to Pesticide Company Alliance with UN-FAO

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Environmental and Trade Groups Successfully Call for End to Pesticide Company Alliance with UN-FAO

(Beyond Pesticides, July 5, 2024) After years of advocacy against corporate interference in global pesticide policy, the United Nations Food & Agriculture Organization (FAO) has ended its “strategic partnership” with petrochemical pesticide and fertilizer trade association CropLife International. ... The signatories to the release last month believe that this severing of ties with the chemical industry will contribute to building momentum from frontline communities for “sustainable, resilient and equitable production systems under the agroecological paradigm.” The groups say, however, “We remain concerned about the FAO’s continuing informal engagements with CropLife and call for greater transparency and accountability in this regard.”

filed under Industry Shenanigans

Sunday, July 21, 2024

Recent Studies Continue To Highlight Connection Between Depression and Suicide in Pesticide-Exposed Farmers

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Recent Studies Continue To Highlight Connection Between Depression and Suicide in Pesticide-Exposed Farmers

(Beyond Pesticides, July 2, 2024) 'Men’s Mental Health Awareness Month, which took place last month, evokes concern about the growing body of science linking pesticide exposure to neurological effects linked to depression. 

Through systematic reviews, meta-analyses, surveys and interviews, and blood sampling, these three studies add to the growing body of science linking pesticide exposure to neurological impacts.'

filed under mental health/psychological

Sunday, July 21, 2024

Pesticide Free Towns Taking Hold Worldwide with Growth in Europe

bylaws

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Pesticide Free Towns Taking Hold Worldwide with Growth in Europe  (Beyond Pesticides, June 26, 2024)

'The Hungarian city of Törökbálint (featured above) is one of several dozen towns to join the European Pesticide Free Towns Network, an initiative of Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Europe.'    

 'We are also working to promote the public acceptance of environmentally friendly mosquito control.” In joining the European Pesticide Free Towns Network, each city must pledge to four primary objectives:

  • Ban the use of herbicides in public areas under city/town’s control
  • Ban the use of all pesticides in public areas under city/town’s control
  • Extend the ban of pesticides to private areas with public access and agricultural areas next to where citizens live
  • Step up greening efforts towards local biodiversity enhancement

There are three tiers or categories in which local governments can adhere to: “glyphosate free in public area”, “pesticide free in public area”, and “entire pesticide free.”

 According to the database as of the day of publication, currently there are over 100 cities and towns that fall into “pesticide free in public area,” two banning glyphosate use in public areas and just one city in Europe banning all pesticide use. There is a legacy of EU member states leading the charge on pesticide regulations and bans, as laid out on the Policy & Strategies page. Germany, Italy, Belgium, Denmark, France, Spain, and Luxembourg are acknowledged as leaders.'

filed under bylaws/international

Sunday, July 21, 2024

Seeds Coated with Neonicotinoid Insecticides Again Identified as an Important Factor in Butterfly Decline

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Seeds Coated with Neonicotinoid Insecticides Again Identified as an Important Factor in Butterfly Decline

(Beyond Pesticides, June 28, 2024)  ...' insect populations globally are declining two to four percent a year, with total losses over 20 years of 30-50 percent, according to a new study of the interacting effects of pesticides, climate, and land use changes on insects’ status in the Midwest....   Of the three drivers of insect loss, the study confirmed unequivocally that insecticides lead the pack in causing the loss of richness and abundance in Midwest butterfly species, particularly monarchs. “Overall declines are overwhelmingly supported by the evidence,” they write. Monarchs, bumblebees, dragonflies and lowland butterflies all drop catastrophically in areas where pesticides are used. 

 And while the steep crash of monarch butterflies coincides neatly with the introduction of glyphosate, the authors note that while herbicides reduce habitat diversity sharply, they do not directly kill insects like pesticides do. The study’s end result was clear: seeds coated with neonicotinoids are causing the most damage. Study published in PLos One.

filed under neonicotinoids 2 and wildlife section/insects/neonicotinoids

Sunday, July 21, 2024

Could robot weedkillers replace the need for pesticides?

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Could robot weedkillers replace the need for pesticides? (The Guardian, 20 July 2024)

Two types of robots are being developed, to cut weeds in monoculture fields, or spray them. Discusses the dangers of pesticides and presents companie developing the technology. 

filed under alternatives/weeds

Sunday, July 21, 2024

Biosolid Biohazard- EPA Sued for Failing to Protect Farmers and Public from PFAS-Contaminated Biosolids

also called sewage sludge

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Biosolid Biohazard: EPA Sued for Failing to Protect Farmers and Public from PFAS-Contaminated Biosolids

(Beyond Pesticides, June 27, 2024) 'Earlier this month, Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER) filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) on behalf of a group of ranchers and farmers in Texas harmed by biosolids contaminated with per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).' 

'EPA estimates more than 2.4 million tons of biosolids, or sewage sludge, are applied as fertilizers on farms, homes, parks, and other lands across the U.S. annually. Biosolids result from the wastewater treatment process, which collects wastewater and greywater, including anything flushed down the drain from homes, businesses, and industries. Some of the industries that discharge to wastewater treatment plants include metal plating, pulp and paper mills, fabric, and plastics manufacturing. Wastewater may even include the liquid waste or “leachate” that oozes from landfills.' In Regina, this also includes the refinery.

'As reported in Nature in 2022, EPA has identified 726 chemicals and “structure-based classes” in the biosolids it has tested, including pesticides and drugs (and their associated metabolites), cosmetics, flame retardants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated biphenyl ethers (PBDEs), dioxins, and dibenzofurans.  PFAS chemicals are not broken down during sewage treatment and yet biosolids are not currently tested for the presence of PFAS or other chemicals, outside of some heavy metals and pathogens.'

SNAP Comment: According to PFAS and Biosolids: Status, technologies, and trends (2023) ''In addition, land application of biosolids divert a valuable organic product from the landfill. A common practice in both the United States and in Canada, it is particularly important to Ontarians as Ontario's landfills will reach the end of their lives within the next 10-12 years.' The use of sludge is rejected in organic farming because of heavy metal contamination. (Sludge By Any Name Will Never Be “Organic”, (Fall 2003). The City of Regina is now landfilling its sludge rather than sending it to be applied to farm fields because of its high contamination with heavy metals. Another legal option for disposal is incineration which likely releases the toxic pollutants in the air. 

filed under Pesticides in soils and sewage sludge (biosolids)

Tuesday, July 9, 2024

Manitoulin Island beekeeper looking for answers after toxic herbicide detected in dead bees Lab tests reveal higher-than-normal levels of glyphosate in bee colonies

glyphosate

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Manitoulin Island beekeeper looking for answers after toxic herbicide detected in dead bees
Lab tests reveal higher-than-normal levels of glyphosate in bee colonies
   (Nishat Chowdhury,  CBC News, Jul 08, 2024)

'So, she sent them off for more testing at the University of Guelph's agriculture and food laboratory. Turns out, the lab detected 0.57 milligrams of glyphosate, a herbicide used to control troublesome weeds, in the dead bees. 

Research from Europe's Pesticide Action Network says exposure to the herbicide in concentrations between five to 10 milligrams, similar to those found in the environment, reduces beneficial gut bacteria in honey bees and dysregulates their immune system.' 

'Last week, CBC News reported a story about a beekeeper in Lively, Ont. who is raising money to run tests and necropsies after she discovered 1.2 million bees suddenly dropped dead at Mikkola Family Farm & Apiary.'

filed under Bee Die-Off p.2

Sunday, July 7, 2024

First Wascana sprying schedule posted, finally

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On previous correspondence from 2024,  Wascana Center authority admitted they were currently spraying, although there were no spraying schedules posted. The first schedule is finally posted for the week of July 1st to 5, 2024. 

https://wascana.ca/about-us/pesticide-spraying-schedules

Friday, June 21, 2024

Gluten-Free Food Test Results

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Gluten-Free Food Test Results (posted by Zen Honeycutt, Moms Across America, 10 June 2024)

This article also presents a summary of results, gluten content regulatory levels and that, "across the board, the samples are extremely low in each mineral based on the FDA Recommended Daily Values and accurate serving sizes per category".

Results of glyphosate and pesticides:

  • 44 out of 46 of the samples came back positive for glyphosate.
  • Out of the 237 pesticides we tested for, glyphosate was the most prevalent.
  • Not all of the gluten-free products that were also organic were the lowest in glyphosate.
  • 21% of the samples were positive for glyphosate at levels higher than 10 ppb, the EU threshold for acceptable glyphosate residues.
  • According to Don Huber, Purdue University Emeritus and plant pathologist of 60 years, exposure to .1 ppb of glyphosate is harmful and should be avoided. 95.6% of the samples contained higher than .1 ppb of glyphosate.
  • 100% of the samples contained trace levels or higher of pesticides. 7 samples (15%) contained only trace levels.

The highest level of glyphosate in gluten-free food tested was in Banza Chickpea pasta. 2,4-D was the second most prevalent pesticide.

SNAP Comment: US study. Not all brands are present in Canada and if one eats these alternative products, one may need an additional mineral supplement.

filed under glyphosate 2 and pesticides in food p.2

Friday, June 14, 2024

Wildlife experts urge action on pesticides as UK insect populations plummet

Wildlife experts urge action on pesticides as UK insect populations plummet    Campaigners say next government must reduce use and toxicity of pesticides before it is too late   (The Guardian,14 June 2024)

In recent years, concerns have been raised over earthworm populations, which have fallen by a third in the past 25 years. A citizen science project that monitors flying insects in the UK, meanwhile, found a 60% decline between 2004 and 2021. The overall trajectory, as government monitoring figures show, has been downwards since the 1970s.       “There is an almost complete lack of effective monitoring of pesticide use in UK agriculture,” said Nick Mole, the policy officer at Pesticide Action Network UK. “What little we do have is incomplete, out of date and on such a broad scale as to be virtually meaningless."      Under the new post-Brexit farming payments, the environment land management schemes, farmers are rewarded for using fewer pesticides. However, agricultural businesses argue that more support and education is needed so farmers do not fear moving away from the pesticides they have long relied on to grow their crops.   SNAP comment: One step forward, two steps back....

Friday, May 31, 2024

Digging deep into herbicide impact on forest ecosystems

glyphosate ecosystem study

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Digging deep into herbicide impact on forest ecosystems (UNBC Stories, 12 February 2024)

Ecosystem Science and Management Associate Professor Dr. Lisa Wood has garnered an Alliance Society grant ... to lead a five-year project aimed at better understanding the extent of the impact of glyphosate-based herbicides on forest systems.

While consistently finding glyphosate residues in forest plants in past studies, Wood and her collaborators have also documented a reduction in forest foods for wildlife, changes in the chemistry of residual foods present after treatment and they’ve noted how environmental conditions such as temperature and photoperiod impact residue breakdown. Building on that body of work, this new project will delve into if, and how, changes to forest vegetation influence the health of wildlife at different levels in the food chain.

“We’re focusing on how GBH influences gut bacteria and hormones in organisms in the ‘wild’ forest food web, which is a new direction as previous studies of this type have been conducted in more controlled settings.”

filed under glyphosate 2 and issues/forestry /herbicides

Saturday, May 18, 2024

Pesticide Residues in Food Do Not Tell the Full Story on Hazards and the Importance of Organic

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Pesticide Residues in Food Do Not Tell the Full Story on Hazards and the Importance of Organic

(Beyond Pesticides, May 1, 2024) According to a new analysis by Consumer Reports, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Pesticide Data Program (PDP) Annual Summary has once again failed to accurately portray the safety of some of the most commonly sold fruits and vegetables in the United States. A review of seven years of PDP data show that 20% of the foods tested pose a “high risk” to the public and 12 specific commodities are so dangerous that children or pregnant people should not eat more than one serving per day, according to Consumer Reports analysis. Consumer Reports contend that U.S. Environmental Protection (EPA) pesticide residue tolerances are too lenient. To better evaluate potential health risks associated with various foods, Consumer Reports applied stricter residue limits than the EPA tolerances (see here for CR’s analytical methodology).

Scientists at Consumer Reports note that EPA’s calculations of “tolerable” levels of pesticides in food are at least 10 times higher than they should be to adequately ensure the health and safety of the public and the country’s ecosystems.

filed under pesticides in foods, p. 2

Saturday, May 18, 2024

Meta-Analysis Catalogues Pesticides’ Adverse Impact on How Genes Function

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Meta-Analysis Catalogues Pesticides’ Adverse Impact on How Genes Function

(Beyond Pesticides, April 30, 2024) Researchers found epigenetic changes, including changes relating to “DNA methylation, histone modification, and differential microRNA expression which ‘can alter the expression of many disease-related genes’,” in a systematic review and meta-analysis of existing literature published in Environmental Epigenetics. “Our review did provide evidence that pesticide exposure could lead to epigenetic modifications, possibly altering global and gene-specific methylation levels, epigenome-wide methylation, and micro-RNA differential expression,” researchers share in the conclusion of the study. This study is an amalgamation of various studies on epigenetic changes based on a literature review process: “Article review involved 3,529 articles found through extensive searches across major human health databases,

filed under Gene Function Changes (epigenetics)

Saturday, May 18, 2024

Parkinson’s Disease Explodes as Researchers Find Connection to Pesticide Exposure and Genes

several classes of pesticides including arsenic based

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Parkinson’s Disease Explodes as Researchers Find Connection to Pesticide Exposure and Genes

(Beyond Pesticides, May 3, 2024) 'Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease in the world after Alzheimer’s. Genetic factors account for only a fraction of PD cases, and for decades scientists have been aware of associations between pesticide exposures and PD. Yet, not everyone exposed to pesticides gets PD. Consequently, neither the genetic nor the environmental hypothesis is fully satisfactory; both may be involved. Thus, there has been great interest in identifying gene variants that affect the risks of PD associated with pesticide exposure. Now a team of University of California at Los Angeles researchers led by neurologist Brent Fogel, MD, PhD has traced a connection between certain gene variants and the occurrence and severity of PD in a cohort of central California PD patients who have had long-term exposure to pesticides. The genes are related to autophagy, the process by which cells organize, degrade, recycle or eject molecules to maintain healthy chemical balance. Autophagy is an essential process throughout the body, including regulation of mitochondria, which are also vital for healthy cellular function. The study supports other research suggesting that autophagy is disturbed in neurodegenerative diseases. '

 The cotton cluster includes organoarsenic pesticides, organophosphorus pesticides, and n-methyl carbamates, all of which have “strong epidemiologic association with Parkinson’s disease,” according to the researchers.'    The authors also expressed concern about the other pesticides such as herbicide trifluralin, Prometryn, a persistent herbicide harmful to fish, and the insecitcide phorate. 

SNAP Comment: There are still 10 arsenic based pesticides registered in Canada mostly for wood treatment (from a historical 20), 28 trifluralin (from 47), 3 (from 5) Prometryn, 4 phorate (from 8). There are still many organophospahtes and carbamate pesticides registered as of 2024.

filed under nervous system effects/Parkinson's

Saturday, May 18, 2024

Sticky trick: new glue spray kills plant pests without chemicals

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Sticky trick: new glue spray kills plant pests without chemicals   Edible oil droplets trap bugs without the harm to people and wildlife that synthetic pesticides can cause. (Damian Carrington Environment editor, The Guardian,  18 May 2024)

'Tiny sticky droplets sprayed on crops to trap pests could be a green alternative to chemical pesticides, research has shown.

The insect glue, produced from edible oils, was inspired by plants such as sundews that use the strategy to capture their prey. A key advantage of physical pesticides over toxic pesticides is that pests are highly unlikely to evolve resistance, as this would require them to develop much larger and stronger bodies, while bigger beneficial insects, like bees, are not trapped by the drops.

Pests destroy large amounts of food and chemical pesticide use has risen by 50% in the past three decades, as the growing global population demands more food. But increasing evidence of great harm to nature and wildlife, and sometimes humans, has led to a rising number of pesticides being banned.

... the new sticky drops are thought to be the first such biodegradable pesticide to be demonstrated.

The drops were tested on the western flower thrip, which are known to attack more than 500 species of vegetable, fruit and ornamental crops. More than 60% of the thrips were captured within the two days of the test, and the drops remained sticky for weeks.'

link to the research paper in the article.

filed under alternatives/insects

Monday, May 6, 2024

ALS Risk Elevated from Toxic Petrochemical Landscape Pesticides, Study Adds to Previous Findings

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ALS Risk Elevated from Toxic Petrochemical Landscape Pesticides, Study Adds to Previous Findings

(Beyond Pesticides, April 18, 2024) University of Michigan researchers have found a statistically significant relationship between heightened risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and household exposure to lawn care products and pesticides. The study results were published earlier this month in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration

The researchers in this study find that pesticide storage, lawn care product storage, and woodworking supplies storage indoors have a statistically significant relationship with poorer ALS survival.

filed under immune/ MS and ALS

Monday, May 6, 2024

Industry Stops PFAS Restrictions, Reverses EPA in Court, as Plastic Leaches Contaminants

on a technical basis

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Industry Stops PFAS Restrictions, Reverses EPA in Court, as Plastic Leaches Contaminants

(Beyond Pesticides, April 9, 2024) The United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, in an opinion authored by Circuit Judge Cory T. Wilson, has vacated an action by the U.S. Environmental Protection  Agency (EPA) that had ordered the Texas-based manufacturer Inhance Technologies, L.L.C. to stop producing plastic containers that leach toxic per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) into pesticides, household cleaners, condiments, and additional products. EPA has taken action after the agency determined that the PFAS created during the fluorination process “are highly toxic and present unreasonable risks that cannot be prevented other than through prohibition of manufacture.” While the court is not challenging EPA’s authority to determine the hazards associated with PFAS exposure to be unacceptable, on a technicality, it is finding that the agency used the wrong section of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), Section 5, which the court says is focused on new uses.

filed uder Polyfluorinated pesticides and PFAs

Monday, May 6, 2024

Wide Range of Harmful Effects of Pesticides Documented in Literature Review

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Wide Range of Harmful Effects of Pesticides Documented in Literature Review

(Beyond Pesticides, April 25, 2024) In a study from earlier this year, “Pesticides: An alarming detrimental to health and environment,” scientists compiled research from 154 articles regarding pesticide use and the adverse effects they have on the environment and human health. 

filed under health/overview and wildlife section/overview

Monday, May 6, 2024

Forever Chemical” PFAS Drinking Water Rules Issued, Urgency to Shift from Petrochemicals Pesticides

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'Forever Chemical' PFAS Drinking Water Rules Issued, Urgency to Shift from Petrochemicals Pesticides

(Beyond Pesticides, April 17, 2024) With headlines drawing public attention to the contamination of drinking water after years of federal government neglect, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced on April 10 new standards to reduce public exposure to PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, commonly referred to as “forever chemicals” because of their persistence. EPA has finalized a National Primary Drinking Water Regulation (NPDWR) for six PFAS, including PFOA and PFOS, which EPA has recognized have no safe level of exposure, regulating new chemicals for the first time since the 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA).

SNAP Comment: Only for 6 PFAs out of the 15,000 on the market, according to a chemicals database (CompTox) maintained by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

filed under PFAs 

Monday, May 6, 2024

Coffee grounds might be the answer to agricultural contamination: Here’s how

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Coffee grounds might be the answer to agricultural contamination: Here’s how (by 
By Harriet Reuter Hapgood, euronews.green , 25/03/2024)

'On a domestic level, try directing your cafetiere contents to your garden, not your bin: used coffee grounds are excellent as an addition to home compost bins and wormeries, a mulch for roses and a deterrent to snails. And on a global scale, science might have the answer.

Scientists from Brazil’s Federal Technological University of Paraná found that leftover coffee can absorb bentazone, a herbicide frequently used in agriculture.

When old coffee grounds are activated with zinc chloride, their carbon content becomes 70 per cent more efficient in removing the herbicide.

The European Environment Agency has highlighted dangerous levels of bentazone in surface water, exceeding levels set in the Water Framework Directive and putting European Green Deal targets for pesticide use in jeopardy.

The UK’s Environment Agency cites bentazone as having the potential to affect long-term water quality and lead to an increased need to treat the UK’s drinking water sources. The herbicide has been shown to impact human health if it is inhaled, ingested or absorbed through the skin.'

SNAP Comment: Bentazone is widely used for a variety of crops including soybeans, alfalfa, beans, corn, peas, peppers, and sorghum. It is used in Europe and approved in the US, but not in Canada at present. As the test has only been done with bentazone, it is unknown at present whether this method would work for other herbicides or pesticides in general. 

filed under pesticide fact sheets/herbicide and remediation/removal

Monday, May 6, 2024

EPA Draft Herbicide Strategy Update Further Weakens Plan to Protect Endangered Species

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EPA Draft Herbicide Strategy Update Further Weakens Plan to Protect Endangered Species

(Beyond Pesticides, April 24, 2024) . The update outlines three types of modifications to the Draft Strategy, including “simplifying” its approach, increasing growers’ “flexibility” when applying mitigation measures, and reducing the mitigation measures required in certain situations. By reducing the stringency of the Strategy, advocates are again questioning EPA’s commitment to fulfilling legal requirements under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) or protecting endangered species and their habitats in the midst of an unprecedented rate of global extinction. ESA is celebrated as one of the most far-reaching conservation laws globally, credited with preventing the extinction of 99 percent of those species the government targets for protection, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). 

filed under legislation/regulatory/ USA p2

Monday, May 6, 2024

Study of Chemical Mixtures at Low Concentrations Again Finds Adverse Health Effects

heptachlor and triallate and trifluralin and lindane at lower concentrations,

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Study of Chemical Mixtures at Low Concentrations Again Finds Adverse Health Effects

(Beyond Pesticides, April 10, 2024) Researchers in a 2024 Chemosphere study find synergistic relationships in certain chemical mixtures, particularly heptachlor and triallate and trifluralin and lindane at lower concentrations, respectively.... “According to a Centers for Disease Control (CDC) assessment, more than 50 pesticides are detected in blood or urine samples from the US population,” Researchers point to a cause for concern.... Researchers “used the exposure data from a complex operating site with legacy pesticide pollution.

 “Only volatile COPCs... in soil and groundwater were included in this study (triallate, trifluralin, lindane, heptachlor, dieldrin, and aldrin,” the researchers indicate in the Methods section. Quantitative risk assessment for pesticide exposure was rooted on oral exposure... which demands a higher dose to induce an identifiable adverse effect relative to inhalation exposure. In other words, using an oral reference dose may underestimate the potential risk.

Researchers did find values suggesting “significant health concerns” to toddlers, infants, teenagers, and adults in “commercial and industrial land use.”... “Nine of the 15 tested binary mixtures of pesticides synergistically reduced cell viability. Seven mixtures (Trifluralin/Heptachlor, Trifluralin/Aldrin, Lindane/Heptachlor, Lindane/Aldrin, Heptachlor/Dieldrin, Heptachlor/Aldrin and Dieldrin/Aldrin) were synergistic at higher concentrations. However, two mixtures of herbicides and OCPs (organochlorine pesticides) (Trifluralin/Lindane and Triallate/Heptachlor) interacted synergistically at lower concentrations'.

SNAP Comment: All the pesticides listed were historically registered in Canada except dieldrin and two still are:trifluralin and triallate. 'There are 23,078 federal sites listed in the FCSI maintained by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, including 5,337 active contaminated sites and 2,355 suspected sites. 15,386 are listed as closed because remediation is complete or because no action was necessary following assessment.' Inventory of federal contaminated sites.    'Research shows adverse health effects most likely occur within a 1.8 mile boundary around a Superfund site.' Millions of Americans Live Near Toxic Waste Sites. How Does This Affect Their Health?(February 16, 2022)

   filed under organochlorines, health/low dose, and mixtures effects

Sunday, April 14, 2024

Raptors And Rat Poison

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Raptors And Rat Poison (By Cathy Bell, Cornell Lab All About Birds, July 15, 2015)

Of 161 raptors brought in to Tufts Wildlife Clinic between 2006 and 2010, 139—a whopping 86 percent—tested positive for anticoagulant rodenticides. Ninety-nine percent of those had brodifacoum in their liver tissues. Yet only nine of these birds displayed sufficient symptoms to lead to a clinical diagnosis of anticoagulant rodenticide poisoning.

A knowledge gap, says Allen Fish, is precisely the trouble. “There’s no clear public record of where we’re putting pesticides, who’s using them, how much is being used. Until we demand that information, we’re flying blind. There needs to be a whole public reckoning of who uses what, and why. We need to track how operators are using pesticides and then see if there’s any correlation with animal kills. We don’t know these impacts. We don’t have any data.”

As for the environmentally conscious homeowner with a rodent problem, Palmer points out that “there are many effective, economical, and easy-to-use pest control options that are much better for human health and for wildlife.” (ABC offers a list at saferodentcontrol.org.)  According to Fish, snap traps offer a more humane way to kill rats than a drawn-out and painful death by poison.

SNAP Comment:  Brodifacoum is usually used in rodent bait. There are 17 brodifacoum containing pesticides regiaterd in Canada in April 2024. Most are registered as commercial products, none for direct use by consumers (domestic).

filed under rodenticides and wildlife section/birds p.2

Wednesday, March 20, 2024

Weed Killer 2,4-D’s Adverse Effect on the Liver Adds to List of Hazards from Food, Lawn, and Water Residues

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Weed Killer 2,4-D’s Adverse Effect on the Liver Adds to List of Hazards from Food, Lawn, and Water Residues

(Beyond Pesticides, February 21, 2024) In addition to its effects including cancer, and reproductive, immune or nervous system disruption, according to international findings, a review published in Toxics finds that the the widely used weed killer 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) causes significant changes in liver structure and function. 2,4-D can damage liver cells, tissue, and inflammatory responses through the induction of oxidative stress

The review primarily focuses on structural damage and chemical biomarkers indicating toxicity to the liver and its function. Assessing studies from PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus, researchers found 83 articles on liver effects and exposure to 2,4-D, ranging from in vivo (in living organisms) models (~70%) to in vitro (in test tube) models (~30%). Most studies focused on the 2,4-D as an active ingredient, while the remainder focused on commercial formulations of 2,4-D.

 From 1974 up to the present day, studies in this review highlight what many studies have previously: 2,4-D has a negative impact on the liver both structurally and biochemically. The review highlights that oxidative stress increases the progression of 2,4-D-induced liver damage. Yet, the lack of studies on the mechanism of action, targets, and molecular pathways involved in liver toxicity needs further understanding.

filed under 2,4-D and liver disease

Wednesday, March 20, 2024

Pesticide Exposure Linked to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Metabolic Disease in Seniors

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Pesticide Exposure Linked to Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes, and Metabolic Disease in Seniors

(Beyond Pesticides, February 27, 2024) Popular culture and official policy continue to ignore a blatant source of the rise in obesity: chemical exposures, including pesticides. A study, “Associations of chronic exposure to a mixture of pesticides and type 2 diabetes mellitus in a Chinese elderly population,” contributes to the now-massive trove of evidence linking pesticides to diseases and shows that by the time people reach retirement age they are suffering from a heavy burden of contamination that raises their risk of complex disease.

The researchers from the Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention identified 39 pesticides in the study population. Women had slightly higher levels and a stronger correlation between obesity, pesticide burden and type 2 diabetes than men. The most significant contributors were β-Hexachlorocyclohexane (β-BHC) and oxadiazon.

SNAP Comments: There are/were 0 β-Hexachlorocyclohexane (β-BHC) products and 2 oxadiazon products registered in Canada until 2023-03-16.  

filed under Diabetes/Obesity 

Wednesday, March 20, 2024

Mexico Ban on Genetically Engineered Corn Imports Spurs Challenge from U.S. and Canada under Trade Agreement

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Mexico Ban on Genetically Engineered Corn Imports Spurs Challenge from U.S. and Canada under Trade Agreement

(Beyond Pesticides, March 20, 2024) A report by CBAN unpacks the ecosystem and wildlife health impacts of genetically engineered (GE) corn in the context of Mexico’s 2023 decision to stop its importation into the country. The phase out of genetically modified (GM) corn imports into Mexico was immediately challenged by the U.S. and Canadian governments as a trade violation under the 2020 U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), which replaced the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) as the primary vehicle for North American trade policy.

SNAP Comment: That is why it is so hard for any country to ban any pesticide products. Canada itself has been sued by so many companies and countries for trying to do the right thing... This reminds me of the first article (2001) reporting that traces of DNA from genetically modified corn had contaminated the genomes of Mexican indigenous maize varieties despite of a 1998 ban. For his discovery and his vocal opposition to "dangerous liaisons with the biotechnology industry" Ignacio Chapela (UC Berkeley),  was denied tenure in November 2003.  'The science journal later said it had erred in publishing the paper, an extraordinary step, just short of a formal retraction, that some attributed to a pressure campaign by the biotech industry.'  The contamination results were upheld by subsequent research. After a bitter battle and lots of international support, Chapela was reisntated as a tenured professor in May 2005. (Professor Ignacio Chapela Wins Bitter UC Tenure Fight (By Richard Brenneman, The Berkeley daily Planet, May 24, 2005))

filed under Legal/Litigation/glyphosate

Wednesday, March 20, 2024

State Legislation Popping Up to Limit Liability of Pesticide Manufacturers

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State Legislation Popping Up to Limit Liability of Pesticide Manufacturers

(Beyond Pesticides, Feb 22, 2024) The Idaho Senate failed to pass SB 1245 last week which would have provided legal protection to pesticide manufacturers from “failure-to-warn” liability. This legal framework has been pivotal not only for plaintiffs, who are typically users of a toxic product, seeking redress from exposure to glyphosate-based herbicide products such as Roundup, but can also potentially extend to any toxic pesticide products. Similar bills have recently been introduced in the Iowa, Florida, and Missouri state legislatures as petrochemical pesticide industry actors such as Bayer face billions of dollars in legal settlements from victims of pesticide injury.

see also  Bayer/Monsanto in Roundup/Glyphosate Case Stung with Largest Multi-Billion Dollar Jury Award, Asks States to Stop Litigation (Beyond Pesticides, February 23, 2024)

filed under Legal/Legislation/ USA2

Wednesday, March 20, 2024

Auditor general says Alberta s enforcement of pesticide rules needs significant improvement

Auditor found records of illegal pesticide sales, little oversight of applications

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Auditor general says Alberta's enforcement of pesticide rules needs 'significant improvement'
Auditor found records of illegal pesticide sales, little oversight of applications (CBC News, Mar 23, 2022)     

 'In a report released Tuesday, Auditor General Doug Wylie found people and businesses may have sold 80 products in 2018 that were illegal in Canada and that inspectors aren't checking whether the people applying pesticides are properly certified.     The auditor general also found admissions where people had applied too much pesticide near bodies of water, or applied pesticides in unsafe weather conditions, which went unnoticed by the ministry of environment and parks...   He also said the provincial government's list of registered pesticides is out of date and inaccurate...  When Wylie's staff reviewed the site, they found about 1,000 legal products missing, and 700 products included that the federal government now prohibits in Canada. The environment department told the auditor general it was working on updating the list...  Alberta stopped proactive inspections of pesticide applicators in 2017, which Wylie said is out of step with many other provinces. He raised concerns, too, with a lack of compiling and publicly posting the measured levels of pesticides in water...  The report said the environment department's pesticide regulatory program has three employees. Whether that's enough personnel to adequately run the program is a question for the government, Wylie said.'

Wednesday, February 7, 2024

US court bans three weedkillers and finds EPA broke law in approval process

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US court bans three weedkillers and finds EPA broke law in approval process   Ruling, specific to three dicamba-based weedkillers, is major blow to Bayer, BASF and Syngenta (The Guardian, 7 february 2024)

'The ruling is specific to three dicamba-based weedkillers ... which have been blamed for millions of acres of crop damage and harm to endangered species and natural areas across the midwest and south.

This is the second time a federal court has banned these weedkillers since they were introduced for the 2017 growing season. In 2020, the ninth circuit court of appeals issued its own ban, but months later the Trump administration reapproved the weedkilling products, just one week before the presidential election at a press conference in the swing state of Georgia.

Bury wrote that the EPA did not allow many people who are deeply affected by the weedkiller – including specialty farmers, conservation groups and more – to comment.

The EPA first approved Monsanto and BASF versions of dicamba touted to be less likely to move off target for the 2017 growing season. Since then, dicamba has caused millions of acres of crop damage, and has been the subject of several lawsuits.

In February 2020, a federal jury in Missouri awarded the state’s largest peach farmer $265m for damage to his farm, though that total was later reduced by a federal judge. In June 2020, Bayer announced a $400m settlement with soybean growers that had been damaged by non-target drift.

For years, Bayer and BASF have blamed other factors than their weedkillers, including illegal use of older chemicals, for the damage. Discovery documents turned up in the litigation showed the companies knew that their dicamba weedkillers would probably lead to off-target crop damage.'

SNAP Comment: There was no public notice and comment as required by law. Note that even when there is, and opponents present their evidence and independent studies, this evidence is usually discounted in favour of industry studies. Cost-benefit evaluations tend to inflate benefits and discount costs.

filed under Legal/Litigation/Dicamba p.2

Wednesday, February 7, 2024

Webinar: When Pesticide Drift Happens To You

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Webinar: When Pesticide Drift Happens To You (PANNA, 28 August 2023)

 While the webinar had an Iowa focus, much of the content is applicable throughout the United States.

This three and a half hour webinar can be viewed here in its entirety.

filed under pesticide drift/incidents and emergencies

Saturday, January 27, 2024

New herbicide for weed control in wheat registered

Batalium, fluorine based herbicide

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New herbicide for weed control in wheat registered

(By Farmtario Staff

'The company said in a release Batalium combats weed-related losses across all soil zones. Its forumulation features four powerful active ingredients from three modes of action, providing an easy-to-use tool for optimal results.'  

The following is provided by Meg Sears:

Batalium is a newly approved herbicide (tech sheet here), that is a mixture of three old herbicidesFlucarbazone-sodium – Group 2, Fluroxypyr – Group 4, and Bromoxynil – Group 6.

Batalium is "Compatible with over 23 registered tank-mix partners, BATALIUM AMPED herbicide lets you customize your weed management program based on weed pressure and application conditions."

Acutely toxic, Health hazard, and Environmental hazard, Irritant

These three herbicides include the -C-F3 group that will break off and affect the ozone layer, as well as halogenated ring structures that typify endocrine disruptors.

filed under Polyfluorinated pesticides and PFAs

Tuesday, January 23, 2024

Sustainable Agriculture Strategy – Ambitious success, from the Guelph Organic Conference

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For arguments on real sustainable agriculture see 

Sustainable Agriculture Strategy – Ambitious success, from the Guelph Organic Conference   (Prevent Cancer Now, 17 March, 2023)

filed under Organics/farming

Tuesday, January 23, 2024

A brand new “Frankenstein” herbicide – Tiafenacil

Tiafenacil is a new fluorine-containing herbicide, that inhibits a key enzyme to make chlorophyll.

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A brand new “Frankenstein” herbicide – Tiafenacil

(Prevent Cancer Now) scroll down the page.

Tiafenacil is a new herbicide, that inhibits a key enzyme to make chlorophyll.

Tiafenacil features several biologically-active, toxic groups, that are combined in a large molecule—a bit like a “Frankenstein” chemical.

This degrades into smaller molecules of toxic chemicals. For example, the top group with three fluorine atoms separates to form highly persistent trifluoroacetic acid. The PMRA found that young children would exceed the maximum allowable daily intake, then stated that is deemed to be acceptable because the assessment is “conservative.” This is hard to understand, given that the extrapolation (a.k.a. “safety”) factor for sensitive populations was eliminated, and there is no human data on this brand new pesticide.

SNAP Comment: As of 23 January 2024, 4 tiafenacil herbicides are registered by the PMRA for use in a variety of crops.

filed under Polyfluorinated pesticides and PFAs

Tuesday, January 23, 2024

P.E.I. potato growers have new pesticide to fight wireworm

Broflanilide, containing several trifluoromethyl groups that will likely contribute to ozone depletion

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P.E.I. potato growers have new pesticide to fight wireworm (Broflanilide)
Potato board estimates cost of wireworm damage to crops at $5 million a year  (Nancy Russell ,CBC, Posted: Mar 04, 2021)   Chemical Formula: C25H14BrF11N2O2.  Chemical name: 3-(benzoylmethylamino)-N-2-bromo-4-1,2,2,2-tetrafluoro-1-(trifluoromethyl)ethyl-6-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl-2-fluorobenzamide.   This product contains several trifluoromethyl groups that will likely contribute to ozone depletion.  

SNAP COMMENT: perhaps it is different in large scale plantings, but in my organic garden, the only potatoes that ever get wireworm damage are the ones planted near the outside grass. When I edge in spring, I used to throw the grass rhizomes on top of the soil to dry up, until I found sereval wireworms seemingly living in there so now rhizomes are thrown on the grass and I have very little problems. Also PEI has an imported wireworm that may behave differently. 

filed under Polyfluorinated pesticides and PFAs

Tuesday, January 23, 2024

Ending glyphosate is a virtuous goal, and reducing pesticides is essential

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Ending glyphosate is a virtuous goal, and reducing pesticides is essential (Prevent Cancer Now, 2023) with a quick review of several registered pesticides of concern. The Federal Government  (Canada) response to the Parliamentary Petition indicates no plan to support substantially lower-input and organic practices, to achieve substantial reduction in pesticides use and risk.

 a stated goal of the UN Biodiversity Conference (COP-15), in Montreal this December, is to reduce pesticides by two thirds.

Tuesday, January 23, 2024

new page on Polyfluorinated pesticides and PFAs + EPA page

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Polyfluorinated pesticides and PFAs 

Some pesticides contain fluorine and some formulants (inerts) are fluorine based. In addition, at least HDPE plastics used in containers (i.e.for food and pesticides) contain them as well, and they are now known to leach from these containers into the content. The leaching is worse in products formulated in organic solvents such as methanol compared with water-based products. For both solvents tested (methanol and water), the study also shows continued gradual leaching of PFAS over time according to the EPA. Some pesticides contain a trifluoromethyl group that end up breaking off and forming ozone-depleting chemicals.It is apparently had to get information on that topic.

Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances (PFAS) in Pesticide and Other Packaging (US EPA, updated 5 December 2023) This page describes EPA actions at all levels for these chemicals. 'In December 2022, the Agency issued a notice announcing the removal of 12 chemicals identified as PFAS from the current list of inert ingredients approved for use in nonfood pesticide products to better protect human health and the environment. These chemicals are no longer used in any registered pesticide product.'

Wednesday, January 17, 2024

Mental Health: Pesticides Continue to Impact the Body and Mind, Especially for Farmers

Depression

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Mental Health: Pesticides Continue to Impact the Body and Mind, Especially for Farmers

(Beyond Pesticides, January 17, 2024) Science continues to find a link between mental health and occupational (work-related) chemical exposure, with a study published in Toxicology finding an increased risk of depression among farmers exposed to pesticides. Brazil study. 

filed under mental health

Wednesday, January 17, 2024

Field Study of Bumble Bees Finds Exposure to Chemical Mixtures, High Hazard, Flawed Regulation

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Field Study of Bumble Bees Finds Exposure to Chemical Mixtures, High Hazard, Flawed Regulation

(Beyond Pesticides, January 9, 2024) A “landscape-level” study finds that typical risk assessment studies used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and European regulators fail to “safeguard bees and other pollinators that support agricultural production and wild plant pollination.” The study, published in Nature (November 2023), evaluates the health of bumble bees (Bombus terrestris) as a sentinel species placed in 106 agricultural landscapes across Europe. 

The study found a combination of insecticides and fungicides, including ten compounds found in colony pollen stores, which the authors consider to present the highest risk, based on acute toxicity. The ten pesticides (nine insecticides and one fungicide) include indoxacarb, spinosad, chlorpyrifos-ethyl, deltamethrin, dimethoate, imidacloprid, cyfluthrin, dithianon, etofenprox, and chlorpyrifos-methyl. Concern about impacts on bees extends beyond acute effects to a range of adverse impacts, including disorientation, other sublethal effects, reproductive effects and development delays, and vulnerability to disease and mite infestation.

 “Without knowledge of safe environmental limits, the total pesticides used—and therefore the total environmental dose—is governed by market demand rather than by a limit on what the environment can endure.” Standard toxicity tests on individual pesticides, according to the authors, is of “limited use” when considering wide, “diffuse environmental effects that arise from ecosystem connectivity at a landscape scale.” The study in Nature adds to the empirical evidence of devastation wrought by pesticides and the ineffectiveness of current European as well as U.S. regulatory approaches...   The failure of EPA to consider the effect of pesticide mixtures in the environment extends to the formulation of pesticide products.'

SNAP Comment: The PMRA does not consider the effects of mixtures either. There are 0 indoxacarb, 23 spinosad, 0 chlorpyrifos-ethyl,19  deltamethrin, 7 dimethoate (Cygon),102 imidacloprid, 10 cyfluthrin, 0 dithianon, 2 etofenprox, and 0 chlorpyrifos-methyl registered in Canada as of now.. Historically, there are over 200 chlorpyrifos prrducts registered. Some may still be in use, as the PMRA only regulates sales, not use. 

filed under Wildlife section/ insects/ p 2

Wednesday, January 17, 2024

Work-Related Pesticide Exposure Puts Farmers at Risk of Cognitive (Intellectual) Harm

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Work-Related Pesticide Exposure Puts Farmers at Risk of Cognitive (Intellectual) Harm

(Beyond Pesticides, January 4, 2024) A review published in the Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice finds an association between farmers’ pesticide exposure and cognitive impairment. Specifically, farmers suffer from attention deficit, lack of information processing, non-comprehension of verbal cues, slow processing speed, memory loss, sluggishness, speech difficulties, and impaired motor function. Additionally, the risk of adverse effects from exposure increases with time spent around pesticides, like in other occupational (work-related) settings.

filed under health/nervous system effects

Friday, January 5, 2024

Groups Petition EPA to Remove from the Market the Weed Killer Glyphosate

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Groups Petition EPA to Remove from the Market the Weed Killer Glyphosate

(Beyond Pesticides, December 19, 2023) Last week, farmworker organizations and Beyond Pesticides, represented by the Center for Food Safety, filed a petition with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) urging that the weed killer glyphosate be removed from the market. The petition cites 200 studies, which represent a fraction of the independent scientific literature on the hazards of glyphosate and formulation ingredients of glyphosate products. This action follows previous litigation in 2022 in which a federal court of appeals struck down EPA’s human health assessment, finding that the agency wrongfully dismissed glyphosate’s cancer risk.

“The threat of glyphosate is way outside the bounds of any reasonable person’s definition of acceptable harm, surpasses allowable risk under federal pesticide law, and represents the poster child for what has gone dangerously wrong with EPA’s program to control toxic pesticides in our environment, homes, workplaces, and communities, with disproportionate injury to farmworkers and landscapers,” said Jay Feldman, executive director, Beyond Pesticides. “This petition attempts to hold EPA accountable to the rule of law, while recognizing that glyphosate, which causes adverse effects to biological systems—from soil microbiota to the gut microbiome, can be replaced by cost-effective organic food production and land management of parks, playing fields, or lawns.” 

filed under Legal/litigation/ glyphosate

Friday, January 5, 2024

Loss of Chromosome Y in Male Farmers Genotoxic Implications for Cancer

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Loss of Chromosome Y in Male Farmers Genotoxic Implications for Cancer

(Beyond Pesticides, January 3, 2024) A study published in Environmental Health Perspectives finds elevated, chronic exposure to glyphosate throughout one’s lifetime increases the risk of mosaic loss of chromosome Y (loss of chromosome Y occurs to many men in some cells due to aging mLOY) that impacts a noticeable fraction of cells... the risk of mLOY is a biomarker for genotoxicity (the damage of genetic information within a cell causing mutations from chemical exposure, which may lead to cancer) and expansion of cellular response to glyphosate, resulting in the precursor for hematological (blood) cancers. This study is one of the first to identify sex-specific chromosome degradation, with stark evidence demonstrating links to various cancers, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

The results find that mLOY is detectable in 21.4 percent of farmers, with mLOY expanding throughout most cells in 9.8 percent of farmers. Most farmers with mLOY expanding throughout most cells are older in age, with a greater lifetime exposure and intensity of exposure to glyphosate. However, these individuals are non-smokers and non-obese, which are other risk factors for mLOY.

Filed under glyphosate p.2DNA damage and cancer/links 2

Friday, January 5, 2024

International Group of Scientists Calls for Restraints on Conflicts of Interest in Publications and Regulation

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Int’l Group of Scientists Calls for Restraints on Conflicts of Interest in Publications and Regulation

(Beyond Pesticides, December 15, 2023) Drawing on a recent gathering of international scientists, a group of 34 scientists published a call for much stricter scrutiny of researchers’ conflicts of interest by agencies that regulate and register chemicals, with recommendations for the newly formed Intergovernmental Science Policy Panel. The Environmental Science & Technology article cites an abundance of examples of chemical companies and their trade associations manufacturing doubt via an array of techniques, resulting in agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) dropping certain provisions from rulemaking, ignoring scientific consensus, and keeping chemicals on the market—and in the environment—that many scientists say should be entirely banned. 

The problem of industry interference applies to almost every industrial chemical, including pesticides, pharmaceuticals, plastics, flame retardants, and asbestos. The tactics remain the same across fields, and are derived from the campaigns waged by climate deniers, tobacco companies, and fossil fuel companies as detailed in 2010 in Merchants of Doubt by Naomi Oreskes and Erik M. Conway.

The article documents lobbying costs, but also presents  at least 24 strategies industry uses to disguise its conflicts of interest and further its economic goals, according to Rebecca Goldberg and Laura Vandenberg, researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. These include, the authors write, “‘revolving doors’ between a regulatory authority and the industry it is meant to regulate; reliance for safety data on unpublished industry documents while largely ignoring publications by independent scientists; and covert influence by the industry.” They also often threaten lawsuits against researchers whose work conflicts with their goals.

filed under Industry Shenanigans/ p.2

Friday, January 5, 2024

Low-Dose Chronic Glyphosate Exposure Increases Diet-Induced Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

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Low-Dose Chronic Glyphosate Exposure Increases Diet-Induced Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

(Beyond Pesticides, December 21, 2023) A new study published in Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology adds to prior research indicating glyphosate promotes the occurrence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) through diet by causing liver inflammation and oxidative stress. More importantly, the predisposition for NAFLD occurred at levels within toxicological limits, which are doses of glyphosate classified as causing no adverse effects or No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL).  NAFLD is a condition that causes swelling of the liver and can eventually lead to cirrhosis, cancer, or liver failure.

Health officials estimate about 100 million individuals in the U.S. have NAFLD, with NAFLD being the most common liver disease among children. Cases of NAFLD have doubled over the past 20 years. 

However, glyphosate did increase the rate (upregulation) of 212 genes associated with oxidative stress and inflammation in the liver while downregulating 731 genes related to cell division. Muouse study. 

filed under glyphosate p.2 and liver disease

Friday, January 5, 2024

THE PESTICIDE PUZZLE A Look at Agricultural Chemicals

30 minute video

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THE PESTICIDE PUZZLE   A Look at Agricultural Chemicals (Real Ag series, 19 Dec 2023) 30 minute very interesting video giving a good introduction to pesticides.  

 It features a case study on atrazine by reknowned biologist Dr. Tyrone Hayes. PAN Senior Scientist, Marcia Ishii (PhD Ecology and Evolutionary Biology), shares her knowledge on the ecological, social and political dimensions of pesticides in food and agriculture. Rob Faux (Fox) speaks about the benefits of agroecological practices based on two decades of growing experience.

filed under atrazine and Pesticides 101Organics/farming

Thursday, January 4, 2024

Ontario superior court certifies Canada-wide class action seeking compensation for cancer caused by pesticide glyphosate

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Ontario superior court certifies Canada-wide class action seeking compensation for cancer caused by pesticide glyphosate  click on statement for the record for the pdf document. 

 (January 2, 2024—Ottawa: Bill Jeffery, Executive Director and General Legal Counsel of the Centre for Health Science and Law)

'The Ontario court action alone claims $1.2 billion plus several, as yet unquantified, additional amounts to compensate for damages. Although the main elements of proof (especially of causation) remain to be proved in the full trial, Justice Grace described the record before him as ‘mammoth’ and comprising 17,000 pages of legal and factual material. Acknowledging the Supreme Court of Canada’s reminder that “certification is a meaningful screening device” Justice Grace wrote: I have concluded there is some basis in fact for the plaintiff’s theory of liability, despite the fact its proponents face significant challenges. The required threshold has been crossed. para. 124'

filed under Legal/.litigation/ Canada p.2