• SNAP Display at Event
  • SNAP Tour of Organic Vegetable Garden
  • Grow a Lush Garden Organically
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • Learn About Pesticides in Foods
  • Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • LIving Near Fields Increases Pesticide Exposure

Latest News...

Monday, July 26, 2021

Death of as Many as 107,000 Bumblebees from Neonicotinoid Insecticides Studied

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Death of as Many as 107,000 Bumblebees from Neonicotinoid Insecticides Studied

(Beyond Pesticides, July 16, 2021) Recently published research reviews the 2013 Wilsonville, Oregon mass bumblebee die-off from application of the neonicotinoid dinotefuran on 55 linden trees in a big-box-store parking lot. In that single event, the research paper (published in Environmental Entomology) estimates between 45,830 and 107,470 bumblebees from some 289–596 colonies were killed. Reporting on the new study, by Entomology Today, quotes primary conclusions of the co-authors: “Our study underscores the lethal impact of the neonicotinoid pesticide dinotefuran on pollinating insect populations,” and, “It is likely that the vast majority of mass pesticide kills of beneficial insects across other environments go unnoticed and unreported.”

SNAP Comment: As of 26 July 3032, there are 7 dinotefuran products registered in Canada by the PMRA for dogs and cats, outdoor spraying of some external structures and as a cockroach gel. 

filed under neonicotinoids and wildlife/insects

Monday, July 26, 2021

Chemicals, including Pesticides, in Wastewater Discharge Contaminate Oysters in Pacific Northwest

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Chemicals, including Pesticides, in Wastewater Discharge Contaminate Oysters in Pacific Northwest

(Beyond Pesticides, July 08, 2021) 'A Portland State University (PSU) study finds oysters of varying distances from wastewater discharge pipes along the Oregon and Washington state coast contain low levels of chemical contaminants....Although wastewater treatment facilities clean water draining from sinks and toilets, the process does not adequately remove all contaminants. The process can leave behind pharmaceutical drugs and personal care products (e. g., shampoos, make-up, deodorant) residues in treated water. PSU has already found that pesticides from the forestry industry threaten clams, mussels, oysters (bivalves) along the Oregon coast.

Although this study finds that chemical concentrations present in oysters remain under federally established guidelines, aquatic environments continuously encounter environmental pollutants and toxic compounds. These contaminants are known to have harmful biological consequences on both aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

The use of pharmaceuticals, like antibiotics and antifungals treatments, and pesticides in local marine ecosystems (e.g., insecticides to control sea lice in farmed salmon) results in coastal habitat loss and genetic health risks like pest resistance among wild marine organisms.'

filed under wildlife/aquatic organisms. 

Monday, July 26, 2021

Parents of Harmed Children Sue Manufacturer of Brain-Damaging Insecticide Chlorpyrifos

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Parents of Harmed Children Sue Manufacturer of Brain-Damaging Insecticide Chlorpyrifos

(Beyond Pesticides, July 14, 2021) Corteva (formerly DowDupont) is facing a potential class-action lawsuit after several California families filed suit claiming that the use of the insecticide chlorpyrifos around their homes resulted in birth defects, brain damage, and developmental problems in their children.

filed under Legl/Litigation

Monday, July 26, 2021

Kids Who Eat Organic Food Score Higher on Cognitive Tests, Study Finds

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Kids Who Eat Organic Food Score Higher on Cognitive Tests, Study Finds

(Beyond Pesticides, July 7, 2021) Organic food consumption among children is associated with higher scores on tests measuring fluid intelligence and working memory, research published in the journal Environmental Pollution finds. This spanish study looked at all exposures... Likewise, the result associating organic food consumption with higher rates of cognition could be indicative of socio-economic status as opposed to specific food consumption.' Many previous studies have shown a higher pesticide burden in children and how pesticides affect development.Links.

filed under children

Monday, July 26, 2021

Conservation Genomics Pinpoint Pesticides and Pathogens in Decline of Bumblebees

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Conservation Genomics Pinpoint Pesticides and Pathogens in Decline of Bumblebees

(Beyond Pesticides, July 13, 2021) Bumblebees exposed to pesticides and pathogens display changes in gene expression that can be pinpointed and analyzed by cutting edge research tools “We’re looking directly at bee tissues  to try and get clues to the stressors that are affecting this bee. I think this is a gamechanger for sure. With a single study, we are able to implicate a couple of really obvious things we’ve talked about for years – pathogens and pesticides – in the case of Bombus terricola.”  says study coauthor Amro Zayed, PhD.

'Researchers discovered 61 differentially expressed genes, including those involved in detoxification, as well as those associated with neurodegenerative disorders and immune response. ..Bumblebees display gene expressions that are associated with exposure to neonicotinoid insecticides, fipronil, and a range of pathogens, including deformed wing virus and sacbrood virus.... A 2015 report by the European Academies Science Advisory Council found, “Several studies have demonstrated synergistic effects of neonicotinoid residues with bee parasites and viruses.' 

filed undeer neonicotinoids and wildlife/insects

Wednesday, July 7, 2021

IARC Monograph on Glyphosate

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IARC Monograph on Glyphosate

filed under cancer/links between individual pesticides and cancer

Monday, July 5, 2021

Disease Carrying Mosquitoes Developing Resistance to Widely Used Mosquito Control Pesticides

permethrin

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Disease Carrying Mosquitoes Developing Resistance to Widely Used Mosquito Control Pesticides

(Beyond Pesticides, July 1, 2021) Yellow fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti) are evolving resistance to the pyrethroid insecticide permethrin, according to a study published by Colorado State University, highlighting the need to adopt ecologically-based mosquito management. Widespread, intensive use of the pesticide in mosquito control has allowed genetic mutations to persist among these mosquito populations, causing subsequent resistance to permethrin.  Insecticide resistance has been an issue since the introduction of DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) in the 1940s.

filed under resistance and pyrethrins

Monday, July 5, 2021

Rod Cumberland presentation on glyphosate to N B Standing Committee examining glyphosate use in forests

Effects of glyphosate on deer populatio

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Monday, July 5, 2021

Widely used neonic insecticides may be a threat to mammals, too

Neonicotinoids can also harm rabbits, birds, and deer

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Widely used neonic insecticides may be a threat to mammals, too
Neonicotinoids, used on corn seed and other crops, are already accused of contributing to declines of insect pollinators. Now there’s evidence they can also harm rabbits, birds, and deer.(By Elizabeth Royte, Food and Environment Reporting Network, February 5, 2021)

'Over the past several years, scientists have found that only about 5 percent of neonic seed coatings are taken up by crop plants. The rest washes or wears off seeds. The chemicals accumulate in soils and waterways, where a wide range of wildlife is exposed to them. Evidence is growing that compounds tailored to take out invertebrates can also harm mammals, birds, and fish. In a 2019 study, Roy set up camera traps in agricultural fields where she had deliberately spilled treated seed. Her motion-triggered cameras recorded more than a dozen bird species (including ring-necked pheasants, geese, and turkeys), plus bears, raccoons, rodents, rabbits, foxes, and skunks, all feeding on the treated seed.'
Add deer, antelope and likely all the moose living in farmland these days.

filed under neonicotinoids and wildlife/mammals

Monday, July 5, 2021

Dr. Matt Bett s presentation to N B Standing Committee examining glyphosate use in forests

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Dr. Matt Bett's presentation to N B Standing Committee examining glyphosate use in forests (Professor of Forestry, Oregon State University, 24 June 2021) i hour video presentation. 

This covers effects of all herbicide used in Oregon, including glyphosate. Biodiversity decreased in plots sprayed once (light spraying)  twice (industrial standard) or 3 times (experimental). Wildlife loss is likely due habitat loss due to herbicide use. Although tree growth is 18-20% higher in treated plots, the red spruce germinates very well under canopy and just has to be released by cutting stems besides it. Economic discounting analysis indicates that it likely doesn't 'pay'; to spray. 

filed under Forestry