• Learn To Manage Weeds Without Chemical Pesticides
  • Driving Near Recently Sprayed Fields Exposes People to Pesticides
  • SNAP Tour of Organic Vegetable Garden
  • Learn About Pesticides in Foods
  • Learn to Manage Pests Naturally
  • Link to SK Organic Resources
  • Learn About Colony Collapse Disorder and How to Protect Bees
  • Learn to Keep Insects Out of your Crops
  • LIving Near Fields Increases Pesticide Exposure
  • Weeds Can Be Managed Without Chemical Pesticides

Latest News...

Thursday, February 21, 2019

DDT Exposure During Early Life Associated with Increased Risk of Breast Cancer

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DDT Exposure During Early Life Associated with Increased Risk of Breast Cancer  (Beyond Pesticides, February 20, 2019)

Women exposed to DDT during ‘early windows of susceptibility’ in their childhood are at increased risk of developing breast cancer, according to new research published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

'These studies, and the predictable lag time between exposure, health impacts, and epidemiological data on those impacts should lead lawmakers and regulators to consider taking a more precautionary approach to the introduction of these chemicals into the environment.'

filed under cancer/Links between individual pesticides and cancer or pesticides and individual cancers

Thursday, February 21, 2019

The herbicide glyphosate persists in wild, edible plants: B.C. study

Wood found unexpected levels of glyphosate in new shoots and berries of plants that survived an aerial herbicide application made one year earlier.

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The herbicide glyphosate persists in wild, edible plants: B.C. study (RANDY SHORE, Vancouver Sun, February 20, 2019)

'Wood found unexpected levels of glyphosate in new shoots and berries of plants that survived an aerial herbicide application made one year earlier... The 10 species tested were selected for their importance as traditional-use plants, because some First Nations had expressed concerns about the long-term effects of glyphosate on wild plants, said Wood...Glyphosate is typically broken down in soil by microorganisms over a period of months, but how long it persists in living plant tissues is unknown, she said.'

filed under Exposure to Pesticides and glyphosate

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

French, German farmers destroy crops after GMOs found in Bayer seeds

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French, German farmers destroy crops after GMOs found in Bayer seeds  (Reuters, 06/02/2019) The company producingthe seeds was formerly owned by Monsant. Seeds were produced in a non-gmo area of Argentina. Bayer is compensating affected farmers for economic loss. 

SNAP comment:I see two lessons in this:1. It's impossible to keep gmo seeds separate. 2. It's easier to get compensation for economic loss versus health problem 

filed under gmos/general

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

New study claimed to show safety of CRISPR shows the opposite

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New study claimed to show safety of CRISPR shows the opposite  (GM Watch: 29 January 2019)

'Such lobbyists aim to dismantle the EU's process-based GMO regulation, which acknowledges the inherent uncertainties of the GM process, and replace it with product-based regulation such as that of North America, where only the intended resulting product is assessed for risk.'

'Thus far, this is a well carried out study that breaks new ground in terms of separating the gene editing process into its different elements and working out which element caused how many of certain types of mutations.' 

'Their conclusion, "Our data support a recent call to 'Regulate genome-edited products, not genome editing itself'."  is 'entirely at odds with the authors' own findings. Their results show that the CRISPR process, taken as a whole, induces hundreds of procedurally induced mutations. They show that the process is inherently problematic. Thus regulation based only on what the end product is intended to be is obviously diametrically opposed to what the science – including the authors' own results – is telling us.'

filed under gmos

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Glyphosate use linked to phosphorus pollution in water bodies

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Glyphosate use linked to phosphorus pollution in water bodies (GM Watch, 30 January 2019)

'Estimating the supply of phosphorus (P) derived from glyphosate use, both globally and in the US alone, we show that trends have markedly increased over the past two decades. Across the US, mean inputs of glyphosate‐derived P increased from 1.6 kg P km−2 in 1993 to 9.4 kg P km−2 in 2014, with values frequently exceeding 20 kg P km−2 in areas planted with glyphosate‐resistant crops...Although still a minor source of P relative to fertilizers, P inputs from glyphosate use have now reached levels comparable to those from sources for which P regulations were initiated in the past. We thus argue for greater recognition of glyphosate's influence on P flow in watershed research and management.'

filed under water

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Bees face yet another lethal threat in dicamba, a drift-prone pesticide

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Bees face yet another lethal threat in dicamba, a drift-prone pesticide  (By Liza Gross, Reveal, January 23, 2019)

'From 2016 to 2017, U.S. honey production dropped 9 percent. Official statistics for 2018 have not been released.' Bee orders for pollination in California orchards have trouble being filled.'Coy became convinced that plummeting honey production at Coy’s Honey Farm, which is Arkansas’ largest beekeeping operation, was due to dicamba after reading one of Mortensen’s studies. The research showed that doses of dicamba that mimicked the drift associated with spraying the weed killer delayed flowering and reduced by half the number of flowers that plants produced and the number of pollinator visits.' Link to study 'Effects of the herbicide dicamba on nontarget plants and pollinator visitation' in article. 

filed under bee die-off

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Eating GM maize sprayed with Roundup increased death rate – study

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'Eating GM maize sprayed with Roundup increased death rate – study (GM Watch, 16 February 2019)

'The section of the paper reporting the results of the G-TwYST study states, "The mortality rate of the male rats fed the 33% NK603 + Roundup diet was significantly higher than that of the corresponding control group" fed non-GM maize."'

'However, the authors buried this finding in the detail of the study. They failed to make any mention of it whatsoever in the abstract. The abstract only states – falsely – that "no adverse effects related to the feeding of the NK603 maize cultivated with or without Roundup for up to 2 years were observed"'.

'This misrepresentation of the study findings raises the question of why scientists funded with EU taxpayers' money would apparently downplay such results, misleading the public and the scientific community.'

'The increased mortality in the males fed NK603 + Roundup was related to pituitary tumours, according to the Discussion section of the paper'although pituitary tumors occured at the same rate. Only the males in the Roundup-treated group were subject to overeating and being overweigth and the researchers did not research that. 

The analysis found potential conflict of interest. 'Many experts involved in G-TwYST and its affiliated EU-funded studies also had affiliations with industry or organisations funded by industry.'

SNAP Comment: One should also question.how the study made it to a prre-reviewed journal with wrong conclusions......

filed under industry shenanigans/Inteference with Research and Research Publication 

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Outcry grows over fired Agriculture Ministry whistleblower, as CAQ dodges questions

Quebec story

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Outcry grows over fired Agriculture Ministry whistleblower, as CAQ dodges questions
Quebec story (CBC News,  Feb 14, 2019)  'Pressure is increasing on the Coalition Avenir Québec government to reinstate a whistleblower fired from his job last month after exposing private-sector meddling in pesticide research...Radio-Canada reported that industry representatives were pressuring scientists to avoid publicizing findings that demonstrated neonicotinoids — a class of insecticides — are harmful to bees and other pollinating insects.'
filed under  industry shenanigans/ Inteference with Research and Research Publication
 

Monday, February 18, 2019

Bug Bombs Don’t Work – At All, According to Study

For cockroaches. All the fogger products contained pyrethroids,

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Bug Bombs Don’t Work – At All, According to Study

(Beyond Pesticides, January, 30, 2019) '“In a cost-benefit analysis, you’re getting all costs and no benefits,” said Zachary DeVries, PhD, co-author of the study. “Bug bombs are not killing cockroaches; they’re putting pesticides in places where the cockroaches aren’t; they’re not putting pesticides in places where cockroaches are and they’re increasing pesticide levels in the home...Tests conducted one month after the bug bombs were released still showed pesticide residue levels 34% higher levels originally found in resident’s homes”

All the fogger products contained pyrethroids. Learn about alternatives to pesticides for cockroach infestations  under Additional info.

filed under pyrethrins

Monday, February 18, 2019

Drinking Water Contaminated with Neonicotinoid Insecticide Byproducts

US study

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Drinking Water Contaminated with Neonicotinoid Insecticide Byproducts

(Beyond Pesticides, February 8, 2019)  'The experts discovered two metabolites of imidacloprid (a neonicotinoid insecticide) residues that had not previously been identified in drinking water — desnitro-imidacloprid and imidacloprid-urea. The researchers note both that these metabolites have never been evaluated for their potential risks to human and environmental health, and that there may be potential risks of anthropogenic compounds that can be created when water with neonicotinoid residues, and thus, these metabolites, undergo typical water treatment (often chlorination and/or pH treatment)...The presence of neonics in drinking water is concerning per se, because federal regulators have never addressed what might be “safe” levels of such insecticides in tap water,

filed under water and neonicotinoids