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Latest News...

Monday, October 3, 2022

Trouble for Bambi: Neonic Levels in Wild Deer Spiking in Minnesota Raise Contamination Concerns

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Trouble for Bambi: Neonic Levels in Wild Deer Spiking in Minnesota Raise Contamination Concerns

(Beyond Pesticides, September 7, 2022) Neonicotinoid (neonic) insecticides are causing widespread contamination within deer populations in Minnesota, with recent data showing significant increases over sampling that took place just two years earlier. 

Results of the 2019 sampling showed ubiquitous contamination of deer spleens throughout the state. Of 799 deer spleens analyzed that year, 61% of them contained neonics. The 2021 results focus in on the southwest area of the state, where there is more farming and forestland. Of the 496 samples tested in that area, 94% of samples analyzed find neonics... Not only did prevalence of the chemicals increase, so did concentration. The research conducted on neonics and deer in South Dakota determined that a body burden of neonics over .33 parts per billion represents a risk threshold for adverse effects. At this level, exposed fawns in laboratory experiments died... But the latest (Minnesota) findings show 64% of neonic detections above this level.'

SNAP Comment: I haven't heard of anyone checking for this in Saskatchewan. Certainly, almost all canola seeds are treated and likely more crops.

filed under neonicotinoids and wildlife/mammals

Monday, October 3, 2022

With Global Disease Rates Rising, Do Pesticides Take Some of the Blame? Science Says, “Yes.

With Global Disease Rates Rising, Do Pesticides Take Some of the Blame? Science Says Yes

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With Global Disease Rates Rising, Do Pesticides Take Some of the Blame? Science Says Yes

(Beyond Pesticides, September 15, 2022) A review published in Scientific African finds pesticide exposure contributes to the increase in non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Tanzania, reflecting implications for global health. There are four main NCDs, including cardiovascular diseases, cancers, respiratory diseases, and endocrine-disrupting diseases like diabetes.

From 2017 to 2018, the authors observed an increase in pesticide imports, up to 4.5 million liters, and the registration of 1,114 pesticides. Ecological evaluations demonstrate the pervasiveness of pesticide residues in food, water, and soil resources, identifying intolerable contamination levels. Moreover, residents of Tanzania lack proper awareness of the harms of pesticide exposure among the population. Regardless of existing pesticide regulations in Tanzania, mismanagement of pesticides has led to higher exposure. 

Moreover, WHO estimates NCD death rates to increase by 17 percent in the next decade, significantly surpassing deaths from communicable, maternal, perinatal, and nutritional diseases combined.

filed under health/overview

Monday, October 3, 2022

Ingestion of Real-World Pesticide Residues in Grain Threatens Bird Offspring More than Parents

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Ingestion of Real-World Pesticide Residues in Grain Threatens Bird Offspring More than Parents

(Beyond Pesticides, September 8, 2022) A study published in Environmental Pollution finds parental exposure to real-world, sublethal concentrations of pesticide residues on grains is a major contributor to unfavorable offspring development among foraging birds. Parents’ ingestion of grains with conventional pesticide residues, whether from contaminated or pesticide-treated seeds, results in chronic exposure that adversely affects offspring health, even at low doses. 

However, researchers find that ingestion of low pesticide residues in grain has consequences on reproduction and offspring quality without altering mortality. Chicks whose parents consume grains with pesticide residues are more petite in size, lack proper skeletal growth, and have lower red blood cell counts with increasing body mass index as a trade-off.

filed under birds and mixture effects

Sunday, September 25, 2022

Pesticides plague Californians of color, new study shows

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Pesticides plague Californians of color, new study shows ( Shannon Kelleher, The New Lede, 15 Sept. 2022)

'Ventura County (California) is known for its year-round production of roughly $2 billion worth of fruits and vegetables that feed people throughout the US and more than 70 other countries. Strawberries are the top crop, but workers also produce peppers, tomatoes, blueberries, avocados, and more.

The study found that 17.1 million pounds of pesticides, or an average of 5.7 million pounds per year, were sprayed in Ventura County from 2016 to 2018. The pesticides used included more than 60 types known to be carcinogenic and 74 types linked to endocrine disruption. Another 85 pesticides used in the county were linked to developmental and reproductive toxicity.

Notably, the study found that township sections where people of color were the majority had not just the most pesticide use, but also the most toxic pesticide use. More than half of the population in these areas was Latino or Hispanic. In contrast, areas that were relatively free of pesticides were overwhelmingly white communities.

“The strongest association we have seen between pesticide exposure during pregnancy and effects on children’s brains are with cognition, so like IQ and attention, ADHD,” said Gunier. “We have also looked at respiratory health, like asthma and lung function. For that, we actually see stronger associations with exposure during their childhood.”

As Harari began researching risk factors for advanced thyroid cancer at UCLA, she noticed that a lot of her referrals were coming from Bakersfield in Kern County– one of the top agricultural counties in the U.S. In a recent case-control study using thyroid cancer cases from the California Cancer Registry, Harari and colleagues found that 10 of the 29 pesticides they analyzed were associated with thyroid cancer.'

filed under exposure to pesticides, cancer/ links, respiratory, nervous system, human rights

Sunday, September 25, 2022

EPA confirms PFAS can leach from shipping containers into food, other products

contamination found far higher than the US updated drinking water health advisory level; includes Canadian guidelines

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EPA confirms PFAS can leach from shipping containers into food, other products   (By Shannon Kelleher, The New Lede, 12 September 2022)

Toxic chemicals knowns as PFAS leach from the walls of shipping containers into the products they contain, potentially contaminating food, pesticides, and other products transported all over the world, according to study by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

The EPA analysis found that 8 types of PFAS compounds leached into water and methanol samples stored in fluorinated high-density polyethylene (HDPE) containers after just one day.

The EPA said the analysis provided “a clear indication” of the migration of PFAS from container walls to the liquid solutions in the container. The agency said the amount of PFAS leached into the solutions generally increased with time during the agency’s 20-week testing period.

The levels of contamination the EPA found were far higher than the updated drinking water health advisory level of about 0.004 parts per trillion (ppt) that EPA recently set for PFOA, one of the PFAS chemicals identified in the barrels.'   see also EPA Confirms PFAS “Forever Chemicals” Leach into Pesticides from Storage Containers (Beyond Pesticides, September 14, 2022)

SNAP Comments: Canadian Water guidelines for PFAs (June 2019)  'Treatment options for PFAS: PFAS can be removed by treating well water: using either an activated carbon filter installed at the tap or where the water enters the house; or using a reverse osmosis system installed at the drinking water tap. Reverse osmosis systems should only be installed at the tap, as the treated water may cause corrosion to the plumbing and cause other contaminants, like heavy metals, to leach into the water.'

filed under body burden

Sunday, September 25, 2022

Court smacks USDA for lack of transparency in GMO labeling

useful to Canadians

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Court smacks USDA for lack of transparency in GMO labeling ( Carey Gilla, the NewLede, 14 Sept. 2022)

SNAP Comment: When one looks at how many products on Canadian shelves come from the US, this is useful to us. 

'Though the law provides for “a mandatory uniform national standard for disclosure of information to consumers,”  the USDA did not adhere to that standard in crafting rules for how the law would be implemented, the court found.

The court said the law specifically requires that a electronic or digital link be accompanied by “on-package language” indicating that the link provides access to food information, along with a telephone number that provides access to the bioengineering disclosure.'

filed under gmo/labeling

Thursday, September 22, 2022

The Monsanto Papers Corruption of Science and Grievous Harm to Public Health

New book by Seralini on a David and Goliath battle for truth

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The Monsanto Papers
Corruption of Science and Grievous Harm to Public Health

Part of Children’s Health Defense
By Gilles-Éric Seralini and Jérôme Douzelet

'A David and Goliath battle for truth

A specialist in GM foods and pesticides, the biologist Gilles-Éric Seralini has studied their toxicity and effects on people's health for many years. In September 2012, for the first time in a major scientific journal (Food and Chemical Toxicology), he published a study showing the effect on the liver and kidneys of two of Monsanto's flagship products: Roundup weedkiller and the GM foods created to absorb it. Images from the study of tumor-ridden rats fed with GM foods and Roundup went viral. The study was a PR disaster for Monsanto.
 
The multinational soon bounced back and did everything in its power to cover up the study—leaning on the publishers to retract the findings. Monsanto began a series of smear campaigns to discredit Seralini and fellow researchers and intimidate their supporters, while pumping out their own collection of fake research findings and testimonies. These practices were met with huge suspicion, but there was no concrete evidence until, in 2017, Monsanto was ordered to publish tens of thousands of confidential documents in a class-action lawsuit presented by thousands of individuals afflicted with serious illnesses from their use of Roundup. The "Monsanto Papers" that were produced subsequently proved the company’s cynical attempts at a cover-up as well as its fraudulent practices.
 
Gilles-Éric Seralini and Jérôme Douzelet delved into the documents and discovered how, in the pursuit of its own short term economic interests, Monsanto used sophisticated methods of deceit to bypass legislation devised to protect millions of people. Seralini and Douzelet discovered how Monsanto managed to provide phony assessments to conceal the poisons its products contain, thus deceiving the public authorities and the scientific and medical communities.'

filed under industry shenanigans and resources/health

Thursday, September 22, 2022

Water Testing Offense: the Provinced Asked for It

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Water Testing Offense: the Provinced Asked for It (Russell Wangersky, Regina Leader Post, 2 September 2022)

Environment and Climate Change scientist took water samples ner Pense and were confronted for being on private property and considered criminal trespassers. They were taking water samples to monitor for  pesticides. The Saskatchewan government was a stakeholder at a meeting where 'all stakeholders expressed support for strenghteming PMRA's information base for pesticide decisions through enhanced water monitoring and pesticide-use information." so should have know about and supported it rather than angry tweets and a letter of complaint to the federal minister. see also Trevor Herriot, Al Birchard: The Sask. government is fanning unfounded fears over water testing

filed under Water/Pesticides in SK water

Tuesday, August 30, 2022

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Contribute to Liver Injury, including Toxic PFAS and Pesticides

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Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Contribute to Liver Injury, including Toxic PFAS and Pesticides

(Beyond Pesticides, August 12, 2022) Gestational (during pregnancy) exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) like pesticides, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), among others, may increase pediatric (child) liver injury and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) risk, according to a study published in Environmental Health.

The study examined the effect of three organochlorine pesticides, four organophosphate pesticides, five polychlorinated biphenyls, two polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), three phenols, four parabens, ten phthalates, five PFAS, and nine metals on the liver.  The results confirm that all EDCs increase the odds of liver injury or liver cell apoptosis, except phthalates and phenols, due to high molecular weight.

filed under endocrine disruption and liver disease

Tuesday, August 30, 2022

Parents’ Exposure to Pesticides Indicative of Childhood Cancer Risk among Offspring

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Parents’ Exposure to Pesticides Indicative of Childhood Cancer Risk among Offspring

(Beyond Pesticides, August 18, 2022) A study published in Environmental Research suggests occupational (work-related) exposure to pesticides among nonpregnant women and men may increase childhood cancer risk for offspring

Although work-related maternal and paternal exposure to pesticides does not have an increased association with childhood cancer risk overall, exposure indicates a 42 percent higher risk of lymphoma (primarily Hodgkin lymphoma) and a 30 percent increased risk of solid non-CNS tumors in children. Additionally, paternal pesticide exposure can indicate a 15 percent risk for myeloid leukemia. The researchers detect that even low levels of pesticide exposure may lead to a higher risk of childhood cancers.

filed under children and cancer/links